The Antifaros

The idea of performing Faro shuffles backwards is well known. You can separate the cards by moving them alternately upwards and downwards as you pass them from one hand to the other, and then separate the two packets by extracting one of them and tossing it on top of the other. Obviously, this is the same as making two piles on the table by dealing out the cards one by one.

But it turns out that if you make four piles, or eight, sixteen or thirty two, and gather them up, one on top of the other in a certain order, you can do two, three, four or five backwards Faros. And you can do them by dealing out the cards just once, and gathering them up in the proper order.

Moreover, depending on how you gather up the packets, the backwards Faros will be Out or In.

This theory, which studies the combinations that allow us to do all kinds of tricks that require Faro shuffles without dominating or controlling the technique, is explained here for the first time (although a lot of this material was published in 1981 and the following years in the Circular de la Escuela Mágica de Madrid).

If I do one Out-faro, the most direct ANTIFARO would be to deal the cards, one by one, into two piles, and place the second pile on top of the first. The deck ends up in the same order as before the Faro, but the order is reversed, the top card is now on the face, the second card is second from the bottom, etc...

But, if I begin from any initial order position and do two Out-faros, and if I then do two Antifaros the deck will end up in starting position (in the same order, not inverted).

But, I could, after doing two Out-faros, deal four piles at once (dealing out the cards one by one, into the four piles), and gather them up placing the fourth pile on top of the third, both on the second and all three on the first. And the cards will end up in their initial order (but reversed). This is a DOUBLE ANTIFARO.

If I do three Out-faros there are three different ways to reset the deck: Do three Simple-Antifaros. When you finish the order is inverted. Do a Simple-Antifaro and a Double-Antifaro (they end up in starting order).

Or do what is called a TRIPLE-ANTIFARO.

To perform a Triple-Antifaro you must deal the whole deck out into eight piles (two rows of four), from left to right, placing the last four cards of the deck onto the first four piles.

Like this:

Then, gather them up in this way, for a 52 card deck: Pile eight on three, on six, on one, and place the packet on the table. Pile four on seven, on two, on five, and place this packet on top of the first packet that you placed on the table.

Like this:

I don't know the reason, or the mathematical explanation, but the fact is that it works.

To undo four Out-faros, we have these possibilities:

— Do 4 Simple-Antifaros (they end up in initial order).

— Do 2 Simple-Antifaros and one Double-Antifaro (they end up inverted).

— Do 2 Double-Antifaros (initial order).

— Do 1 Simple-Antifaro and one Triple-Antifaro (initial order).

— Do 1 Quadruple-Antifaro (inverted).

The QUADRUPLE-ANTIFARO consists in dealing the deck face down bottom-0WS eaCh* dealing fr°m left t0 right' and from t0P t0

0)

0

0

0

0)

0

0

0

0

0

0

0 )

(these piles have 3 cards)

(these piles have 3 cards)

And pick them up like this:

8 on 11 on 14 on 1, place on the table; 12 on 15, on 2, on 5, together, on top of packet on the table; 16 on 3, on 6, on 9, all on top of the packet on he table; and finally, 4 on 7, on 10, on 13, all on top of the packet on the table.

Which is easy to remember, if you study the following diagram:

parently hapazard manner.

I will explain how in the next paragraph. But before I do, let's finish the Antifaros.

If we do 5 Out-faros, there are many possible combinations:

— Do five Simple-Antifaros (order is inverted).

— Do three Simple-Antifaros and one Double-Antifaro (initial order).

— Do two Simple-Antifaros and one Triple-Antifaro (order inverted).

— Do one Simple-Antifaro and one Quadruple-Antifaro (initial order).

— Do one Simple-Antifaro and two Double-Antifaro (order inverted).

— Do one Quintuple-Antifaro (order inverted).

The QUINTUPLE-ANTIFARO is theoreticially possible, but in practice its impractical.

You would have.to deal out 8 rows of 4 piles each (32 piles) and gather them up like this:

20 on 7, on 26, on 13, on 32, on 19, on 6, on 25, on 12, on 31, on 18, on 5, on 24, on 11, on 30, on 17, on 4, on 23, on 10, on 29, on 16, on 3, on 22, on 9, on 28, on 15, on 2, on 21, on 8, on 27, on 14, on 1.

Which is obviously slow and complicated.

With all this we know how to do up to a Quadruple-Antifaro (and, by combining, up to 8), which is the same as going backwards, and doing, i s

for example, 2 Quadruple-Antifaros, returning to the initial order (the same as if we do 4 Double-Antifaros).

But remember that an N Antifaro is the same as an 8-N Out-faro. So a Triple-Antifaro is the same as 5 Out-faros (8 — 3 = 5).

The only detail that you have to remember is that each Antifaro reverses the order of the deck. But notice that if the cards are turned face up when dealt, when you gather them up in the normal way, but face up, the deck ends up in its initial order, it is not reversed.

We can now reach any position in the 8 Out-faros chain without having to perform a single Out-faro. Rather, we can get there through a combination of (one or more) Antifaros, according to our preference.

This opens up an immense new field for Faro effects, because we can look for and find excuses and valid justifications for the Antifaro:

0

00

0

0

00

0

0

00

0

0

0 0

0

0

0 0'

0

0

00

0

0

JUSTIFYING THE ANTIFAROS

The Simple-Antifaro can be justified as a method for dividing the deck into two equal piles.

The Double-Antifaro, as a bridge deal (13 cards are dealt, one by one, to four players).

The Triple and Quadruple-Antifaros, as a way of mixing the cards, dealing them out into piles, which you later pick up in a random and irregular way.

To achieve this, let's look at how to pick up the only lay-out that is a little complicated:

GATHERING UP THE QUADRUPLE-ANTIFARO

Follow these steps, with the deck dealt out into 16 piles, and numbered as in this diagram:

a) The R. H. picks up pile 8, the L. H., number 14.

c) The L. H. places its pile on the table and the R. H. places its pile on top of the L. H.'s pile.

f) The L. H. places its cards on top of the ones on the table, and the R. H. follows, placing its cards on top of them.

i) The L. H. places its cards on top of the ones on the table, the R. H. follows.

«We pick up piles from different places».

«So that they end up in total disorder».

j) The R. H. picks up 4, the L. H., 10. k) TheR. H. places 4 on 7, the L. H., 10 on 13. I) The L. H. places its cards on the table, the R. H. places its cards on top.

If you try it two or three times, you will see that it is quite easy to remember, that it is quick (do it on a close-up pad), and that it really does produce the impression that you are shuffling the cards, and that you gather them up in a totally arbitrary, outrageously mixed-up and crazily chaotic sort of way.

ANTEFARO-6. In my study of Antifaro theory, I found the way to do six Antifaros, which is the same as performing 2 Out-faros. I'm talking about a 52 card deck, of course! Well, nothing is easier: Deal out the 52 cards into 13 hands of four cards each.

Was this article helpful?

0 0

Post a comment