Study Of The Mexican Turnover

If you perform a «feint» before you execute a Mexican Turnover, you can change the cards during the feint, without turning them face up. Later, you can slowly turn the card over, without any change, and the pass is 102% clearer. I have fooled-illusioned magicians with this method. Let's look at it in detail.

1. One of the cards that you want to change is face down on the table. The other card is held in the fingers of your right hand, as you can see in figure 1.

The fingers of your left hand, palm down, rest on the lower left hand corner of the back of the card on the table.

2. Slip the card in your right hand under the card on the table, following the arrow in figure 1, until the two cards are squared up (fig. 2). Notice how your right thumb goes on top of the two cards.

3. With your right thumb, pull the top card lightly to the right, slipping the lower left hand corner out from under your fingers (fig. 3).

4. Your left fingers now hold the lower left hand corner of the bottom card (the card closest to the table, fig. 3).

Lift your right hand until you reach the position in figure 4, as if you wanted to turn over the card under your left fingers, but press firmly with your left fingers on the corner of the card, making the long right edge of the card slip off the tips of your right fingers, and return to its previous position, flat on the table, face down.

5. As you perform these actions you will find that the cards produce a sound, or snap, which helps to confuse, reinforcing the illusion that you

have tried to turn over the card on the table with your right hand but were unsuccessful.

6. With an impatient look on your face, and a «tsk» to yourself, get ready to try again, without pausing, to turn the card on the table over, with the help of the card in your right hand. (Actually, you have already made the switch, but the spectators don't know it.)

7. Once again, slip the card in your right hand under the one that is beneath your left fingers, but don't introduce it all the way, push it under until about half of the card is covered.

8. Now raise the card in your right hand, lifting the outer right hand

corner of the card on the table slightly (fig. 5), and as you maintain the pressure on your left fingers, continue raising the card in your right hand, until the outer right hand corner of the card on the table slips off the lower left hand corner of the card in your right hand, and falls to the table (as always, face down).

You have apparently failed again in your attempt to turn over the card, but this time your gestures have been clean and clear for the audience. This second attempt should be performed quickly, and should last just a second, no more.

9. For the third time, try to turn over the card on the table, slipping a third or less of the card in your right hand beneath it, and remove your left fingers, which can release their pressure on the corner of the card on the table (Fig. 6). Slowly and clearly, turn the card on the table face up

(as always, using the card in your right hand, figure 7), with a satisfied smile on your face.

NOTES.—All of the actions, except the last step, should be performed rapidly, but without hurrying, and the three attempts together shouldn't take more than five seconds to perform.

Performing the «Mexican Turnover» this way is totally undetectable, and no «misdirection» or other type of «covering up» is necessary. Nevertheless, it is best to look at the spectators during the first try, and look at the cards on the table during your second and third attempts.

What you want to do is fix the idea that you cleanly turn over the card on the table with another card. By making sure that the second and third attempts are well fixed in their memory, later, they remember an extremely clean and clear action.

Surprisingly, it works for magician- spectators as well. It is in your hands to study it, practice and dominate it, and you will have another potent weapon for your card magic.

Naturally, your psychological attitude is very important. Before you begin the move, center your attention on the card on the table. You must justify the fact that you use another card as a «spatula» to turn the card over: it might already be in your right hand as a result of the previous phase of the routine, you might have tried to pick it up beforehand with your fingers and found that it slips and you can't pick it up (if it is on a table without a close-up pad, or on a book, or any other smooth surface), or you might have used the card in your hand to point at cards or spectators, «pointer» style, etc...

It is a good idea to show the card in your right hand beforehand, and then change it (double lift, top change, second deals...) for the card in question— that is, the card that will appear face up at the end of the move, as if it were the card on the table.

If you Top Change the card in your right hand after you perform the Mexican Turnover, for the one you showed beforehand (which should be on top of the deck), the move will be even clearer.

Another possibility is that the card on the table is a Joker (the audience doesn't know it). You show the other Joker, change it for the «chosen» card, and perform the Mexican Turnover; when you finish, you can show the card in your right hand. Inasmuch as it is «still» a Joker, it seems impossible for you to have changed anything.

If you use any card and a duplicate, instead of the Joker, the sequence will even fool more knowledgeable magicians. Without wanting to be stupidly vain, I can assure you that I have done so many times, and if you are a member of the large family of my magician friends, my pride and joy, you have probably seen me perform it more than once (and without suspecting that I have done a «move», I hope!).

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