Escorial76

To Paul Curry with gratitude and admiration I have always felt that one must justify in s'ome way the four packets in the trick Out of This World . Several justifications exist (and some of them are very good), but one of them has been studied very little that the cards in each pile are of the same suit four suits, four piles. That's how this effect came to be. I told Luis Garcia about it while working out the program for the III Jornadas de Cartomagia de El Escorial. Although it seemed...

To Ascanio

When I first heard of you, they told me It's incredible He puts a white penknife into his hand and it comes out red, then green, then , the Ultimate I remained in suspense. 1 tried to imagine you does he have wings on his back, or perhaps a third eye in his forehead 1 continued with my magic, taken from P. Ciur and Bernat (standard magic books on the young Spanish magician's bookshelf Tran.), those marvellous books Two years later I met you at a meeting of the Sociedad Espa ola de Ilusi n ismo....

Black Days

Very briefly this effect consists of the performer finding which one of seven black cards a spectator has in mind and then causing the remaining six to change to red. There is more to the effect than the above bare outline which is just a pointer to assist the reader to understand the end objective as he studies the explanation of the methods used, combined with the really important part the entertaining story without which it would be just another card trick. To perform this routine you need a...

The Staircase Change

Don't repeat don't pass this by without trying it. It's an excellent piece of card magic. The basic effect is that the aces are located , then three of them change to indifferent cards in an impossible way. The actual ending effect is up to you learn the basic handling, then you'll see what I mean. The presentation and attitude will also be up to you. For example you can openly drop the aces onto the top of the deck after the completion of a 4-ace routine, or you can get them to the top...

Info

Repeat the process again with the next card (two cards) but don't push it out any further. 7. Pull the three cards forward as a group and then push them to the right, twisting them around your left second finger (fig. 19). You can place them on the table to finish the move NOTE. If you want to use this move in a Multiple Ambitious Card routine, as you twist and strip out the cards, let them fall onto the packet on the table (fig. 20). Cover them with the cards in your left hand (fig. 21)....

Two Card For Two Card Switch

A good change for more than one card (two, three, four ), for the same number of cards, is necessary in many card tricks and routines. Nevertheless, there are very few sleights or techniques in the magician's library that achieve this result rapidly and directly. This change, along with those that I will explain afterwards, have been created to serve this function. I think they are very, very, useful. The idea is to switch the second and fourth cards (counting from the top of the deck) for the...

The Tamariz Turnover

Tamariz says, 1 developed this move in 1968 and used it in various tricks and routines. It featured in my lectures many times. In 1976,1 showed it to a well known American cardician. Two years later, an incorrect explanation appeared in a leading American magazine, described as an anonymous move. So to set the record straight, here is the correct explanation and for an added bonus a subtle addition by that great magician Asca-nio. First the basic technique. It is necessary to start in the...

Peruvian Transposition

Double Peruvian Turnover of two cards (A, B). Show the face of B. Leave A on the table, face down, with a bent comer (on the right side of the table). 2. Double Peruvian Turnover of two cards (B, C). Show the face of C. Place B face down on the table, with a bent corner (on the left side of the table). 3. Remove the top card of the deck (C), hiding the bent corner. Use it like a spatula to turn over the card on the left it is B (It should be C). 4. Continue, but without giving the action too...

Applications Of The Perpendicular Control

Here are several quick and direct effects which can be used to practice the TPC in front of an audience. Effect. A chosen card is returned to the center of the deck, where it is captured in a sandwich formed by the two face up red aces. Procedure. 1. Remove the two Aces and place them face up, one on top and one on the bottom (SUP and INF) of the face down deck. 3. After the card has been looked at, tell the spectator to remember it and return it to the fan, but don't let him push it all the...

Glimpse With

After a card has been peeked and controlled by your left pinky, which maintains a break below it, cover the deck with your right hand (deck face down), and extend your left pinky, making the corner of the peeked card stick out on the right. Perform the Perpendicular Control (TPC). The card ends up as in figure 6a. Bend the part of the card that is sticking out downwards with your left fingers (fig. 29). You can see the card's number and suit. Straighten out the card. Do the Perpendicular...

Concealment In Left Hand

This method is very natural and though I explain it with only one card, it is perfectly valid when you have several cards in PP. You can fan the deck and close the fan. Nothing unusual will be seen, and it will seem impossible that you are maintaining any kind of control over the cards that were chosen and returned. I can highly recommend it. Bring the card(s) to PP making sure that they are replaced in the bottom half of the deck. Before we fan the cards, we must place the left index finger...

Concealing The Card In Pp By Bending It

Once the card is in Perpendicular Position, you can bend the part of the card that is sticking out downwards with your left fingers, and remove your right hand (fig. 21). The card will be hidden. After a pause, place the right hand back over the deck and extend your left fingers. The card returns to its original position. Sometimes, depending on the quality of the cards, it will be necessary to place your left fingers below the part of the card that is sticking out, and push upwards, to...

From Extracted PP to Left Hand Palm

Starting from the position in figure 11, your two hands move back together, but without totally closing the spread. Now, the card in PP is between the rest of the cards, touching your left palm and fingers. To make it easier, curve your left hand slightly, to let the PP pass (fig. 12). Your left hand remains open and relaxed (fingers extended). Remove your right hand. Extend your left thumb. Whenever you like, you can close your left hand and the card in PP will end up in your palm. You can...

TPC stripping out beneath the spread

The idea here is to control a card to the bottom of the deck. All you have to do is start from (PP) (fig. 7), and pull the top cards to the right with your right hand, so that their slight spread covers the part of the card in PP that is sticking out (fig. 8). Your left thumb also helps form this mini-spread (or maxi-bevel) of the cards to the right. You can now remove your right hand. The card in PP is hidden (fig. 9). Continue spreading the cards slightly, and turn your right hand palm...

Coming Attractions

With this move you can, for example, lose four cards at the same time in different parts of the deck. Square up and cut once and you already have the four cards palmed in your left hand, automatically. Just like that You also could have lapped the four cards at the same lime, in a way completely beyond suspicion with the help of the TPC, without cutting the deck or controlling the cards It can be used as a multiple shift, leaving the cards you want to control on the top (SUP) or the bottom...

Double Peruvian Turnover

A similar idea Turn over two cards as one, on top of the deck. Bend its (their) inner left hand corner(s) (as one) (fig. 4). Turn the cards face down onto the deck, holding it (them) by its (their) bent corner, and with your left thumb push off the SUP card to the right and downwards (fig. 5). Place your left pinky over the bent corner of SUP-2 (the corner that can't be flashed). Place the SUP card on the table, with the bent corner. (The bent comer of the card that is now the SUP of the deck...

From TPC to Bottom INF

Starting from the position in figure 11, your left hand rotates towards the left until it reaches the position shown in figure 15. Then, bring your two hands together. The card in PP will slide below the INF cards and will end up lined up with them (figs. 16a and 16b). Notice that you must place your right pinky against the lower edge of the deck (that is, the edge of the SUP cards that is closest to you). The result of all this is that all the cards, including the card in question , end up in...

The Juan Tamariz Phenomenon

Without a doubt, Juan is the most famous, most successful, and most popular personality in the history of Spanish magic, for both laymen and magicians. That is why it isn't easy to discuss his magic without repeating what we already know, without repeating the obvious. But I will say it anyway Juan is no less than one of the most important magicians in the history of world magic. When lam asked what qualities a person must have to be a magician, I think of Juan as an example and answer...

The Antifaros

The idea of performing Faro shuffles backwards is well known. You can separate the cards by moving them alternately upwards and downwards as you pass them from one hand to the other, and then separate the two packets by extracting one of them and tossing it on top of the other. Obviously, this is the same as making two piles on the table by dealing out the cards one by one. But it turns out that if you make four piles, or eight, sixteen or thirty two, and gather them up, one on top of the other...

Notes On The Faro And Other Shuffles

As I attempt to dominante the Table Faro (simple, but I haven't dedicated anough time to it yet), I am going to tell you what I think about the Faro shuffle, and I will include a Total False Shuffle that is absolutely diabolical. You will see 1. On the supposed difficulty of the Faro shuffle It is easier than you think. The most difficult part is to feel secure performing it in front of an audience, in any lighting conditions, and with a deck in any condition. Of course, you have to have some...

The Talisman

A card is shown and held in the fingers of the left hand. When you touch it with a talisman, the card turns over all by itself, showing that its face has changed. The card is given to a spectator (see other more surprising and original effects at the end of the routine in variations I through V). Any strange object that can pass as a magical charm, or any coin, if a talisman is not available. 1. Show the talisman (little statue, a coin, etc.) and talk about its marvellous properties. 2. Have a...

Introduction

In this book I have collected some of the tricks, passes and routines that I have created or discovered. Some of them have been published in European or American magazines, others in my book-magazine Magia Potasio the majority have never been published. Several of them have been written up by Harry Lorayne and were published in Apocalypse, one was written by Fred Robinson and was published in Pabular. To all of them, to Jos Puchol, to Mary Pura Mirelis, to Luis H. Trueba, and to Ricardo Marr ,...

The Cascade Shuffle

I originally worked this out to correct errors in the Faro. Later, I realized that it is an excellent Total False Shuffle, with which I have fooled magicians and laymen, and which is still the one I use most frequently when performing club magic (standing), and close-up magic (sitting down). Begin by performing a riffle shuffle in the air, then take the deck as in figure 1. The outer card (the one with whole back showing) must be in the bottom packet. If you are holding the cards the other way,...

History And Bibliography Of The Trick

When, in 1931, Dai Vernon, The Professor , chose 10 of his best effects, he included this one, calling it the Vernon Card Problem, in his legendary 20 Manuscript, which received its name because of its incredible (for the epoch) price, though the real name was Ten Card Problems. A simplified version appeared in New Vernon Variations, see the magnificent book, published by Faucett Ross, Early Vernon (Magic Inc. Chicago, 1962 pp. 32-34 and 58-60). This second simplified version was published,...

The Peruvian Turnover

The Mexican Turnover is a marvellous move. But, it is detectable when it isn't done well. In the last chapter I described the results of my investigation of the sleight, and I believe that 1 have found a precious and undetectable Mexican Turnover. But while I was travelling in Peru, in the highest regions of the Andes close to 4.000 m. above sea level , these techniques occurred to me, which is why I call them Peruvian . 1 believe they are very subtle. You can judge for yourself. Try to perform...

Study Of The Mexican Turnover

If you perform a feint before you execute a Mexican Turnover, you can change the cards during the feint, without turning them face up. Later, you can slowly turn the card over, without any change, and the pass is 102 clearer. I have fooled-illusioned magicians with this method. Let's look at it in detail. 1. One of the cards that you want to change is face down on the table. The other card is held in the fingers of your right hand, as you can see in figure 1. The fingers of your left hand, palm...

The Tamariz Perpendicular Control

The Tamariz Perpendicular Control TPC , which is what magician's throughout the solar system except on Earth call this move, occurred to me in the year of our lord one thousand nine hundred and sixty two 1962 . The next year oddly enough it was 1963 , 1 worked on the move a great deal, and found several applications. In the following years, until today 1981 the year this article was written , or 19 years later, becausc if you subtract 62 from 81 on the handy pocket calculator that you bought...