Chapter Seven Ken Brookes Presentation Of The Vanishing Card Case And Cards

This delightful sequence of moves provides an ideal introduction to a series of card effects or even a single card trick. EFFECT From his pocket, the performer removes a card case, opens it and tips out the pack. The cards are fanned out and used to fan the left hand which, of course, must still hold the case. The left hand is opened when it is seen that the case has vanished. Calling attention to his right trouser pocket the performer transfers the cards to his left hand, then reaches into his...

Counting The Envelopes

When you reach the stage in the preliminary patter where you refer to the envelopes, the packet is already in the left hand and as you specify the number, you count them singly from the left hand into the right in the following manner 1 Starting from the position shown in Figure 1 (performer's view), push with the left thumb, causing the envelopes to spread a little to the right. Do not worry if the spread is uneven, all that is required is that the right hand is able to take the envelopes...

The False Count

It is most important that this be rehearsed well, for upon its convincing performance depends the whole illusion. The right hand removes, between first finger and thumb, the loose red handkerchief. (The hands must be moved well apart at each count, to demonstrate beyond doubt that the silks are separate.) The performer counts FIGURE 3. One. The loose yellow silk is now taken similarly to the count of Two. In appearing to count off the third separate silk, the important move is made as follows...

To Upset The Knot

Take the very end of the right hand silk at the tips of the left thumb and forefinger. Bend the forefinger and extend the other fingers of the left hand, so that with the right hand holding that portion of the right silk horizontally between the hands, the knot is hidden behind the left fingers. Pull the hands sharply apart, as though to further tighten the knot. Provided the knot is not already too tight, the sharp pull will straighten out the right silk, leaving the left silk tied around its...

Tonny Van Dommelens Front Page Cards

This novel effect was a feature of TONNY VAN DOMMELEN'S act which he performed at the International Congress of Magicians at Amsterdam (1955). It has all the ingredients of first class entertainment as, although basically a card trick, it can be seen and appreciated by the whole audience when performed in a large theatre. An entertaining feature is that the performer apparently makes three mistakes in finding selected cards yet saves his reputation by reveal -ing the correct cards in an...

Ken Brookes Knotout

PLUS A SIMPLE ROUTINE FOR THE SYMPATHETIC SILKS This is a series of moves for the secret unknotting of three silks, openly tied together in the Sympathetic Silks effect. These moves can be used in any normal routine for this classical trick with silks. First, the correct method of tying and upsetting the knots will be described. The knots when tied, are ordinary reef knots (or for American readers, square knots). Most people can tie a reef knot, but for the benefit of the others, this will now...

Chapter Twelve Marconicks Gypsy Thread

When Harry Stanley returned from GRON1NGEN in Holland, where he had been attending the DUTCH NATIONAL CONGRESS, he was full of praise for a young Dutch magician by the name of MARCONICK. In the REVIEW Column of the GEN (Volume 10, Number 5) Harry wrote I must mention a really brilliant young man . . . MARCONICK . . . his act contained so many refreshingly new things that I honestly don't know where to start to try to describe them. I booked him to appear in my show on September 26th and you...

Chapter Four Eddie Wards Zombie Card Rise

EDDIE WARD showed me this item which is one of the cutest methods possible for making a card rise from the pack. It is an ideal climax for an impromptu rising cards routine. The effect is that a freely selected card is placed back into the pack which, after being shuffled, is held in the left hand and covered with a handkerchief. The performer then places his extended right forefinger over the top edge of the shape of the pack outside the handkerchief not only does the handkerchief cling to his...

Chapter Nine Diminishing And Expanding Cards

The first person to teach me the finer points of card manipulation was CHARLES KETTLE, a very clever professional magician. He was about seventy years old when I took lessons from him but his hands could perform wonders. In the act with which he had toured theatres, circuses and even fairgrounds for many years, he performed his own version of the Diminishing Cards, which he told me was a combination of Robert Houdin's and Charles Bertram's methods. It was a Fan Diminish Rober Houdin but in...