E F G H

trey at B, the four at C, and a red card at D. The ace is on top of three red cards in your hand.

Ask the spectators, "What do I have in my hand?" They will say that you hold the four red cards. Flip the packet face-up and do a Jordan Count to display four reds. Then turn die packet face-down.

Turn over the top card of die face-down packet, showing a red card. If you like, you can call attention to die specific identity of diis card. Let's say it is the nine of hearts. Turn the card face-down. Snap your fingers over the card at position A (thought to be the ace), saying, "I will make the ace change places with the nine of hearts."

Perform a Double Turnover, showing that the ace is now on top of the packet. Turn the double face-down. Now the right hand draws the tabled card at position A down to position E. The left thumb deals the top card of the packet into position A. Drop the packet onto the card at position E and pick it up.

"I will do it again." Snap your fingers, then turn over the top card of the packet, showing that die ace has returned. The right hand draws the card at position A down to position E. The left thumb deals the ace faceup into position A. The right hand removes die top card of die left-hand stock, and uses it to flip over the card at position F.—the nine of hearts.

The right hand's card is replaced below the left-hand stock. "I will continue, with just three red cards." Perform a three-card Olram Subdety, as follows: The right hand takes the top card of the packet. Both hands turn palm-down, displaying red cards. Rotate die hands palm-up. The right hand tosses its card face-down onto the table. The left hand thumbs the top card of its pair onto the first card. The right hand takes the single card remaining in the left hand and rotates it to display the red face of that card. Turn the card face-down and use it to scoop up the tabled pair. You have displayed three red faces (apparently), but in fact the order of the packet is, from the top: deuce, red, red.

Hold the three-card packet face-down in the left hand. Perform a Double Turnover, briefly showing a red card on top. (Do not call attention to the identity of diis card.) Turn the double card face-down. Snap your fingers over the card at position B. Flip the top card of the packet face-up, showing that the deuce has jumped to your hand. The right hand draws the card at position B down to position F, as the left hand thumbs the deuce face-up into position B.

Take the two cards in the left hand into the right hand, and use this pair to scoop up the card at position F. Flip the entire packet face-up and deal the face card onto the table, face-up at position F.

Turn the pair of remaining cards face-down and hold them in the left hand. Snap your fingers over the card at position C. Then turn over the top card of the left-hand pair, showing that the trey has jumped into your hand. The right hand draws the card at position C down into position G, as the left hand deals the face-up trey to position C.

The right hand takes die single card remaining in the left hand and apparently uses it to flip over the face-down card at position G. In fact, use a Mexican Turnover to switch cards. Thus, you will have a face-up red card at position G.

'I"he audience believes die face-down card at position D to be the four, and the card in your hands to be a red card. In fact, the opposite is true. Snap your fingers. Turn over the card in your hand and the one on the table, showing that die last two cards have changed places. This concludes the sequence.

Brimstone Elevator

This routine has some similarities with the previous eflect. It was also published in Scattershot. It is based on an effect by Dai Vernon and Bruce Cervon, "The Devil's Elevator." However, this approach features a surprise climax.

At the start of the routine, four cards are secretly arranged at the top of the pack. From the top, they are die three, four, two and ace of hearts.

Shuffle the pack, retaining die set-up on top. Then turn the deck hiccup and openly run dirough the cards, outjogging the ace, two, diree and four of clubs as you come to them. When all four have been outjogged, close the deck. With your left hand, strip out die four jogged cards. The right hand holds the deck and flips it face-down. The left hand turns its four cards face-down and drops them on top of die pack. These actions duplicate those required for the Vernon Strip-Out Addition, which will be used in a moment.

The top four cards of the face-down deck are spread and removed by the right hand. Place die four club cards on die table, face-down.

Turn die pack face-up again. Do either a thumb riffle or a quadruple buckle to obtain a left litde-fingcr break above the fourth card from the back of the pack (the ace of hearts). Run through the deck as before, outjogging die red eights and nines. These are stripped out die pack with die left hand, and die four cards below the break are secredy taken behind the stripped-out cards, as shown in figure 32.

The right hand flips the deck face-down, and the left hand drops its eight-card block face-down onto the deck, thus completing the Vernon Strip-Out Addition. Spread the top four cards of die pack, as before, and secredy obtain a break beneath die fifth card from die top. With die right hand, square die spread cards again and remove die five-card block above the break. The audience believes you to have just removed the four red eights and nines. In fact, you are holding a red eight or nine, followed by t he three, four, two and ace of hearts. Place the balance of the pack to one side.

Holding the cards squared, flip the packet face-up and hold it in die left hand. Obtain a small break with the left little finger beneath the face card of die left-hand packet.

The right hand picks up the tabled pile of clubs. Turn these cards face-up and openly rearrange them into numerical sequence with the ace at the face. Drop this black packet face-up onto the left-hand stock. You now hold a break beneath die fifth card from the top of the faceup packet.

The right hand grasps the packet from above, Biddle fashion, and removes the five cards above the break. As the right hand moves away, the left wrist turns inward to prevent the audience from glimpsing the ace at the face of die left-hand stock. At this moment the left hand is palm-down. Turn the left hand palm-up, but use the left fingers to reposition die packet so that it remains face-down.

The right hand's cards are now displayed, with the same switching technique used in die previous effect: The left diumb draws the top card of the right-hand group (die ace) onto the left-hand stock and the card is flipped face-down. This is repeated with the deuce and the trey. The two remaining cards in die right hand (a red card hidden beliind die four) are held squared as one and flipped face-down onto the left-hand stock. At the conclusion of this display, die order of the packet will be, from die top: red. four of clubs, trey of clubs, deuce of clubs, ace of clubs, trey of hearts, four of hearts, deuce of hearts, ace of hearts.

Deal the top four cards of the packet into a face-down row, from right to left, saying, "Four, three, two, ace."

You are holding five face-down cards. Use a Single-Buckle Count to display them as four, in this fashion: The top card is taken imo the right hand. The next card is taken beneadi the first. Buckle the lower most card and take die two cards above this buckled card, squared as one, beneath the right-hand stock. The single card in the left hand is now placed on top of die right-hand stock. As this is done, say, "1 will use these four red spot cards to perform some specialized magic with each of the club cards."

Square die packet. Perform a Back Spread, again displaying four facedown cards. (The top card of diis spread is actually a squared pair.) Pick up the card at the left end of the tabled row, calling it the ace of clubs. Explain, "The value of this card is one. Therefore, I will place it beneath one card." Insert the card beneath the top card of die spread (actually beneath the squared pair). Square the packet.

Snap your fingers, then do a Double Turnover to show that the ace has risen to the top. Turn the double card face-down and deal the top card to the table, returning it to its position at the left end of the row.

"Nowr we will use die four red spot cards with the deuce." As you say this, perform an Elmsley Count with the face-down packet. The last card of this count goes to the bottom of the packet.

Back Spread the packet as before. Pick up the card second from the left in the tabled row% calling it the deuce of clubs. "The value of this card is two. Therefore, it goes two cards deep in the packet." Place this card in center position in the spread. Square the cards.

Snap your fingers, then perforin a Double Turnover, showing that the deuce has risen to the top. Turn the double face-down and deal the top card to the table, returning it to the position second from the left.

Remove the top card of the packet and use it to gesture to the third card in the tabled rowr, saying, "Now I will work with the trey." Return this card to the bottom of the packet.

Spread die cards as four, keeping the fifth card hidden beneadi the fourth. Pick up die third tabled card, calling it die trey. Insert this card beneath the third card of the packet. Square the cards.

Snap your fingers, then perform a Double Turnover, showing that the trey has risen to die top. Turn the double card face-down. Deal the top card to the table, returning it to the position third from the left.

Take the top card of the packet and use it to gesture toward the card at the right end of the tabled row. Return this card to die bottom of the packet. "The four of clubs must obviously go four cards deep. Therefore, it goes all the way to the bottom." Drop the entire packet on top of the card at the right end of the tabled row.

Pick up the packet. Snap your fingers, then perform a Double Turnover, showing that the four has risen to the top of the packet. Turn die double card face-down and deal the top card to the table, at die right end of the row.

"I have shown you several tricks. Each wras more difficult than the one before it." As you say this, gesture with the packet. You can casually flash the face card of the packet, as it is a red spot card.

Return the packet to the deck as you ask, "Do you know what the most difficult part of this routine has been? The finish!" Turn over the tabled row of cards, showing that the ace, two, three and four have changed into hearts.

Troublebacker

This is another transposition routine with a surprise finish. It was first published in Abracadabra in September, 1979. You'll find it a bit simpler than the routines just explained. Six cards are used: the red eights and nines from a red-backed deck, and the ace and deuce of clubs from a blue-backed deck. At the start of the routine, the cards are in order from the top: red, red, red, ace of clubs, deuce of clubs, red.

The cards are held face-down and displayed as six red-backed cards. This is accomplished by an expanded Elmsley Count, as follows: Hold the packet in left-hand Pinch Grip. On the count of "one," die top card is taken into the right hand. On "two," the next card is taken on top of the first. On "three," the left thumb pushes the top du ee cards of its stock to die right as a block, and the right hand takes this block, while at the same time the twro cards in die right hand are stolen back beneath the single card remaining in the left. On "four," the next card from the left hand is taken onto the right-hand cards. The next card is taken on "five," and on "six" die last card from the left hand is placed on top of all. You have just shown six red backs. The order of the packet is now, from the top: red, red, red, red, ace of clubs, deuce of clubs.

Flip the packet face-up. Spread the cards to show the four red spot cards and the black ace and deuce. Remove die two black cards with the right hand, as you say, "I will work with these two black cards plus the four contrasting cards." As you finish this statement, draw the left hand's four cards square and obtain a left litde-finger break below the top two cards.

Drop the right hand's pair onto the left-hand packet and immediately flip over all four cards above die break. It will appear as if you have simply flipped over the ace and deuce. Deal the top card face-down to the table, calling it the ace. Deal the next card face-down to the right of the first, calling it the deuce. .As this card is dealt, the left hand turns inward, concealing the blue back from the spectator's view.

The packet in your hand shows a red back on top, so all looks fair. Reposition the cards into left-hand Pinch Grip. Say that you will cause the tabled ace to change places with one of die red spot cards. Hold the packet in line with the first tabled card. Snap your fingers. Then do an Elmsley Count, showing a face-up ace among diree face-down cards. The last card of diis count goes to the bottom of the packet. After the count, deal the top card (die face-up ace) to die table. Pick up die original tabled card and place it beneath the packet.

Flip the packet face-up. Do an Elmsley Count, with the last card going to die bottom, showing four red spot cards.

"1 will do it again with the deuce." As this is said, remove the top card and use it to gesture toward the card that is lace-down on the table at right. Replace the card onto the bottom of the packet.

Flip the packet face-down. Do not line up die packet with the second tabled card. Snap your fingers, then do an Elmsley Count, showing four face-down red-backed cards.

Express confusion when the deuce docs not jump from the table to the packet. Then smile and say, "Oh! I know what the problem is. I forgot to line the packet up with the deuce." Line up the packet and the tabled card. Snap your fingers, dien perform an Elmsley Count, showing the face-up deuce among three face-down cards. Place the last card on the bottom of the packet.

Deal the deuce face-up onto the table, next to the face-up ace. Pick up the face-down tabled card and add it to the packet. Fan out die four red spot cards, showing them backs and fronts. Then place this spread face-down on the table, as you say, "This routine has been very easy to follow, because I used contrasting cards. These cards are red..." Point to the tabled red cards. Turn over the ace and deuce as you continue, "...and these cards are blue!"

Naked Lunch

This is an outgrowth of Karl Fulves' "Illusion Aces" plot. It was published in the June, 1980 issue of M-U-bl.

Required are seven cards: three identical red-backed jokers; a red-backed ace of diamonds; blue-backed aces of spades, hearts and clubs. At the start of the routine the packet is arranged in order from the top: joker; joker; aces of diamonds, clubs, hearts and spades; joker.

Start with the packet face-down. Hold die cards in left-hand Pinch Grip and display them with the same counting procedure used in the previous trick: On the count of "one," the right hand draws off the top card. On the count of "two," the hands meet again and the next card is taken onto the first. On "three," the next card is apparently taken onto the right-hand stock. In fact, the left thumb docs a Block Push-Off of the top four cards of its packet, and this block is taken by die right hand while at the same time the right hand's pair is stolen back beneath the left hand's remaining card. On the counts of "four, five and six," the cards now in the left hand are taken one at a time onto the right-hand stock. You have thus displayed six face-down red-backed cards. The order of the packet is now, from the top: three jokers; aces of diamonds, clubs, hearts and spades.

Flip the packet face-up and fan out the top six cards, keeping the seventh squared and hidden behind the sixth. You are showing four aces above two jokers. Square the cards.

Turn the packet face-down and spread the top three cards. The right hand removes the top two cards as the left hand squares the rest of the packet while obtaining a left little-finger break beneath the top card. Turn the right hand's two cards face-up and drop diem onto the packet. The right hand immediately removes all three cards above the break and places them, squared, to your right on the table. (During all the above actions, only red backs will show.)

Flip the remaining cards face-up. Remove the top card (the ace of spades) and use it to gesture toward die tabled packet, as you explain that you will perform with the jokers and each ace in turn. Replace die ace of spades beneath the packet and t able the aces to your left .

Pick up the joker packet and hold it in the left hand. The left thumb pushes the top card to the right, so that you are displaying two face-up jokers, as expected. Pick up the ace of hearts from the top of the tabled group and place it on top of the jokers. Square the packet, getting a left litde-linger break beneath die top two cards.

The right hand does a Double Lift, removing the pair from above the break, squared as one. This double should be held at the center of the right long edge, fingers on top, thumb below. Rotate die right hand's double card forward, so that it is turned face-down.

The left hand spreads its two cards very slighdy, so that only the white border of the bottom card is in view. The audience must not be aware that the lower card is face-down. The right hand inserts its double card between the left hand's pair. At this point, the audience believes the packet to consist of the ace of hearts face-down between two face-up jokers. The true order is, from the top: face-up joker, face-down joker, face-down ace of hearts, face-down joker.

Perform the Variant Fist Flourish, secredy reversing the packet. A face-up joker still shows on top, so nothing seems to have changed. Spread the top diree cards, keeping the fourth hidden. This displays a face-up ace of hearts between two face-up jokers; the ace has apparendy turned over by magic. Extract the ace from the fan and table it face-up to your right, by itself.

Pick up t he ace of clubs and repeat the preceding sequence, causing it also to turn face-up between the jokers. Extract the ace of clubs from the fan and table it on top of the ace of hearts.

The right hand now reaches over to take the ace of diamonds from the initial pile. As your body turns to accommodate this action, the left hand briefly drops to your side and reverses the entire packet. The packet now consists of one face-up joker above two face-down jokers.

State that you will vary the magic somewhat, by placing the ace of diamonds face-up between the jokers. Use a Buckle, Pull-Down or Block Push-Off to obtain a break above the bottom card of the joker packet. Insert the ace of diamonds face-up into the break and square the cards.

Perform a Variant Fist Flourish, secretly reversing the packet. Fan out the top three cards, displaying a face-down card between two faceup jokers. Extract the face-down card, turning it over to show that it is the ace of diamonds.

At this point, you have an option. You can put the ace of diamonds on top of the pile of previously used aces, and continue with the ace of spades, repeating die sequence that was used for the first two aces, then move on to the climax. Or you can extend die routine by offering to do a little "bonus" magic with the ace of diamonds before continuing.

To do diis bonus phase, turn the ace of diamonds face-down and place it below the left-hand stock. Turn over the entire packet, showing the ace again. Then do a Double Turnover, apparently turning just the ace face-down. Openly transfer the top card to the bottom of the packet. Command the ace of diamonds to rise to the top. Now turn up die top card, showing that this has happened. Discard the ace of diamonds, placing it on die tabled pile.

At this point, all three jokers are face-down, so you cannot do the basic sequence with the ace of spades. Instead, spread the joker packet as two cards using a Buckle, Block Push-Off or Back Spread, so that the top two cards are squared as one. Pick up the ace of spades and insert it face-up into the center of this (supposed) two-card fan. Square die cards.

Perform a standard Fist Flourish (which does not reverse the packet). That is, place the packet on the fingers instead of on the palm, as in figure 33, before closing the fingers and turning die hand over. Push die packet through die fist, as in figure 34, and remove it. Now use a Buckle or Partial Ascanio Spread to display the packet as three face-down cards, the ace having apparendy turned face-down.

State that you'll repeat the effect one last time. The right hand extracts the squared pair from the center of the spread and uses it to kick the left hand's jokers face-up. Insert die right hand's double card between the jokers and square the cards.

Perform a standard (non-reversing) Fist Flourish. Now do a Double-Buckle or Back Spread, displaying the ace face-up between two jokers. Remove the ace from the spread and place it on top of the other aces. Square the joker packet, turn it over and table it.

During all of the above activities, only red backs have been seen. The routine is now apparently over. Point to the tabled jokers and say, "In order to do this trick, you must always use red-backed jokers." Ask the spectators if they know why this is.

When diey admit they don't know, explain, "The jokers must have red backs to provide adequate contrast for the surprise climax!" Pick up the tabled aces. Flip this packet face-down and perform an Elmsley Count to display four blue-backed cards.

This routine is related to the last, but is more elaborate. The climax is a blatant attempt to one-up the pay-off of Larry West's "1-2-3-4 Card Trick." "Progression" first appeared in the April, 1981 M-U-M.

Nine cards are used: the five, six and seven of hearts; the trey of spades; blank-backed ace and deuce of hearts; a blank-faced card; two double-faced cards: a trey of hearts backed with a deuce of spades, and a four of hearts backed with an ace of spades. Both of the double-facers can be found in the standard double-faced deck sold in die United States.

At the start of the routine, the packet is in order from die top: facedown six of hearts; face-down seven of hearts; face-down trey of spades; double-facer, diree-side up; double-facer, four-side up; face-down blank-facer; face-down five of hearts; face-up ace of hearts; face-up deuce of hearts.

Hold the packet in the left hand. The right hand grasps the packet from above, and the right thumb riffles up four cards. The left fingers now shift the bottom four cards to the right about a quarter of an inch. This sidejogged stock is screened by the right hand.

Three cards are now apparendy counted into die right hand. In fact, a version of the Veeser Concept is used: The left thumb draws the top card into the left hand. The next card is drawn onto the first. Now die hands come together and the left hand's pair is stolen beneath die right hand's stock, aligned with the sidejogged cards, as the top block of three cards is clipped in the fork of the left thumb and drawn off. During these actions, only backs are seen.

The left hand aims palm-down and spreads its cards into a face-up tabled row, showing the ace, deuce and trey of spades.

The remaining cards are displayed face-down with an Ascanio Spread. The right hand strips out the three-card block and replaces it on the bottom of the packet. Four backs will show while this is done. Square the cards.

Flip the packet face-up and do an Ehnsley Count, showing four blank (aces. (For this and all subsequent counts, I recommend using a Biddle Grip handling, both to keep all actions consistent and to eliminate the need for shifting grips during later actions. A description of the Elmsley Count done from a Biddle Grip can be found in "Twisted Location.")

Take the packet into die palm-up left hand, then turn the hand palm-down. With the right hand, remove the top card and deal it face-down onto the table, off to one side. Return the left hand palm-up.

Use a Double-Buckle or Pull-Down to obtain a left little-finger break above the lowermost two cards of the packet. The right hand picks up the trey of spades from the table and inserts it into the break. Square the cards.

Make a mystical gesture, then do a Jordan Count, displaying four blanks; the trey has vanished.

The right hand extracts the bottom card of the packet as you comment, "Clean as a whistle!" (Ostensibly, this card is the erased trey.) You can display the card on both sides, as it is the genuine blank-facer. Replace the card on top of the packet.

The entire procedure is repeated with the deuce of spades: the left hand turns palm-down; die right hand deals die top card face-down onto die first discard; the packet is returned face-up; the deuce of spades is inserted third from the bottom; a Jordan Count is performed showing four blanks; and the bottom card is removed, commented upon and replaced on top. (Note that this time, in die "clean as a whisde" phase you cannot show the underside of the blank card.)

Repeat the procedure with the ace of spades; however, this time, at the conclusion the "clean as a whistle" action is eliminated (i.e., the bottom card is not transferred to the top).

Flip die packet face-down and take it into left-hand dealing grip while, with the right hand, you hold it from above. Obtain a break beneath the top two cards and secretly reverse the four-card block below the break, using a Half-Pass. With the left little finger, get a new break above the bottom two cards. The hands separate, the left retaining the pair from below the break plus the top card, die right stripping out the central trio. Backs show atop both hands' stocks. Replace the right hand's cards beneath those in the left. These actions take but a moment and should appear as no more than casual "toying."

At this point, the audience will believe they foresee die climax. Assuming that you are holding four blank-facers in your hands, they expect the tabled pile of three cards to regain their original ace, deuce and trev of spades faces.

Say, "This routine only works because I use exacdy seven cards." Flip die packet face-up, displaying the ace of hearts. "That's one." The right hand conies over the packet and quickly riffles three cards from the bottom of the packet to allow the left little finger to obtain a break. In a continuing action, the right hand deals the ace of hearts onto the table, revealing the deuce of hearts on top of the packet.

"That's two." Deal both cards from above the break, squared as one, onto the table, overlapping the ace. The trey of hearts is the next card on the packet; add it to the tabled row. Two cards remain in your left hand, the four of hearts showing on top. Deal this pair, squared as one, onto the tabled row.

Continue by turning up the three face-down tabled cards in brisk rhythm, showing them to be the five, six and seven of hearts as you add them to die tabled display. As each card is turned up, announce its value, yielding a surprising finish in which die face of every card has changed.

Ascension

This routine was an attempt to come as close as possible to duplicating the preceding routine with normal cards. The result bears a relationship to some of Roy Walton's work. This was first published in Harry Lorayne's Best Of Friends (1982).

Ten cards are used, in order from the top: king of spades, ace of diamonds, king of clubs, king of hearts, ace of spades, ace of hearts, ace of clubs, nine of diamonds, nine of hearts, eight of diamonds.

Start with the packet face-down. Fan die cards as eight, keeping the bottom two squared and hidden beneath the eighdi. Square the cards. Spread over the top four, taking them into the right hand without reversing their order. The remaining six cards are pushed deep into the left diumb crotch. Flip die four-card packet face-up and do an Elmsley Count to display four kings. (The king of hearts is seen twice during diis, but as the color distribution is correct, the spectators will believe they have seen all four kings.)

You will find that the second packet held in the left hand does not interfere with die counting action. (For what its worth, 1 seem to have been the first to put this idea into print.)

At the conclusion of the count, flip die four-card packet face-down and place it on the table.

Flip the six-card packet face-up. Perform a Jordan Count to display four red spot cards. At the conclusion of this count, the right hand removes die lowermost card and uses it to flip the packet face-down.

Turn the right hand's card face-down and replace it beneath the packet. (This displacement flourish is a variation on one by Jeff Busby.) The order of the packet is now, from the top: aces of spades, hearts and clubs; nine and eight of diamonds; nine of hearts.

Deal the top card of the held packet onto the table, face-down, off to one side. Spread the remaining cards as three (keeping the lowermost trio squared as one). Pick up the top card of the tabled kings pile and openly insert it into the fan, third from die top. Square the cards.

"It's rather remarkable: 1 place a king among the reds, and yet when we look, we find there is no king; I'm back to four red spot cards." Flip the packet face-up and repeat the earlier display sequence: do a Jordan Count to show four reds, then use the bottom card to flip die other cards face-down, replacing that card face-down on the bottom.

Deal the top card onto the first discard. As before, pick up the top card of the kings pile and insert it third from the top of the held group. This time you can flash the face of the king as it is picked up.

Use the same sequence as before to vanish the king from the packet: do a Jordan Count to show four reds, then use the bottom card to flip the other cards face-down, replacing diat card face-down on the bottom.

Deal the top card onto die discard pile. Pick up the next card from the kings pile, again flashing its face, if you wish. Insert it third from die top of die packet and repeat the above sequence to make it vanish.

Deal the top card onto the discard pile. Pick up the final tabled king and insert it third from the top of the packet. Turn the packet face-up and do a Jordan Count to show that it has also vanished. (There is no need to repeat the displacement flourish.)

As you display the red spot cards, say, "In the end, everything must stay constant. I've got four red spot cards over here." Discard the packet, putting it back in the pack.

"Therefore, what must I have over here?" Point to the tabled pile. The spectators will expect the tabled group to be the four kings. Allow a spectator to check and find that this group unexpectedly consists of the four aces.

Sottovoce

This is a version of the Jerry Sadowitz "Whisperers" plot, with an extra climax. It was published in the Winter, 1984 West Const Quarterly.

Begin with a seven-card set-up on top of the deck: three memorized cards, followed by the four aces. The card sixdi from the top (the third ace) is face-up.

Start by shuffling the top stock to the center, and obtain a left litde-finger break above it. Perform a Riffle Force: The left thumb riffles down the outer left corner of the pack, as you tell the spectator to call "stop" at any time. When a halt is called, with your right hand apparendy lift all the cards above the left thumb's break, in fact, that break is ignored and the stock above the little-finger break is cut off.

Transfer the removed stock to the bottom of the pack. (The set-up is now on top again.) Deal the top three cards into a face-down row on the table, saying, "You stopped me here."

Explain that you will attempt to learn the identities of the three selected cards by having other cards whisper that information to you. "There are only a few cards I can ask for help, because there are only twelve with mouths in the pack. Which would you like me to use—the jacks, queens or kings?"

The spectator chooses, for example, the jacks. Turn the pack faceup and obtain a left little-finger break above the four lowermost cards of the deck (the aces). Openly run through die deck, outjogging the jacks. These are now removed from the deck, using a Vernon Strip-Out Addition to load the aces behind the jacks. You now hold eight cards in die left hand.

The right hand flips the balance of the pack face-down, and the left hand's stock is flipped face-down on top of the pack.

Hold the pack in the left hand and obtain a left little-finger break beneath the card third from the top (made easy by the natural curvature of the reversed ace). The right hand removes the top card. The next two cards above the break, squared as one, are taken beneath the first, jogged to the left. The next card is taken jogged below that stock, and the next card taken is jogged below that. Thus, you have formed a facedown fan of four cards—supposedly the jacks. The actual contents of the packet is, from the top: ace, ace, face-up ace, ace, jack.

Put the balance of the deck aside and square the packet. (You can flash the card at the face, casually displaying a jack.) Explain diat the jacks will help you identify the three selections. As this is said, obtain a break below the top two cards of die packet. Perform a Half-Pass, secretly reversing the lowermost three cards.

Pick up the first tabled selection and drop it face-down onto the packet. Lower your ear toward the packet, as if listening, and announce that the jacks have just told you the identity of die first selection. Name the first memorized card.

Flip the first selection face-up on the packet, confirming your announcement. The card is now apparendy flipped face-down. In fact, perform a five-card Block Turnover. Deal the top card (assumed to be the selection just shown) to die table, face-down. A back shows atop the packet, so all seems fair.

Remove the bottom card of the packet, using this card to gesture toward the two remaining tabled selections, as you ask, "Which of these would you like to use next?" Replace the card on top of the packet.

Pick up the tabled selection indicated by the spectator, dropping it face-down onto the packet. Pretend to listen to die cards, dien announce the identity of this selection. Flip the top card face-up to confirm your pronouncement. As before, perform a five-card Block Turnover as you apparently flip that card face-down again. Deal die top card to the table.

Pick up the final tabled selection, dropping it face-down onto the packet. Pretend to listen to the cards, then announce the name of the last selection. Flip the top card face-up to show you are correct. Now perform a four-curd Block Turnover (made easy by the natural break at die face-up fourth card). Deal the top card to the table.

At this point, the basic effect is over. You have, as promised, revealed the three chosen cards. You are now ready for die two-phase climax. The packet you hold is in order, from the top: jack, face-up ace, three selections.

Hold the packet deep in the left hand. With the right hand, remove the top card and, simultaneously, turn the left hand inward to conceal the ace diat lies face-up on top. Because the packet is held deep in the hand, the bottom card (a selection) is also concealed, by die back of die hand.

During this wrist-turn action, your attention should be focused on die right hand, which snaps its jack face-up as you comment, "It's a lucky thing you chose the jacks. If you'd chosen the queens or kings, the trick would be over. However, this particular jack knows an extra trick, and if you'd like, he'll perform it for you." (Of course, if queens or kings have been chosen, your patter changes accordingly.)

While the above statement is concluded, the hands come together. As the left hand starts to return to palm-up position, the right hand's jack is placed face-up on top of the packet. Thus, the jack arrives on top before the ace can be seen.

Pause to display the jack, then perform a Double Turnover and remove the top card, holding it lace-down in the right hand. This card is apparendy die jack; in lact, you are holding an ace.

Use the right hand's card to tap the packet, dien to tap the tabled group. Drop this card next to die tabled ones and turn over die left-hand packet, spreading the cards as three (die rear card—the jack—squared and hidden behind the third card). The three tabled selections have jumped into your hand.

When the spectators have reacted to diis transposition, conclude by saying, "Oh, no—that wasn't the extra trick." Turn up the four tabled cards, showing that the transposed jacks have changed into aces.

Was this article helpful?

0 0

Post a comment