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Two Finger Holding

Square die packet, with the outjogged double card still projecting, and hold the cards in your left hand. Then turn the hand and die packet over, showing die protruding card(s) to be the queen, as in figure 39. Exclaim, You're right There is a queen. I low did that happen The left hand returns to its former position and the right hand apparently removes the extending queen. In fact, you use a Lyle Change (a variant of the Push-In Change) The right thumb slides die top card of the protruding...

A B

Position B, with three face-down cards at position D. Explain that the face-up cards are leaders so the face-down cards must be followers. Therefore, the followers must follow the leaders. Switch the cards at positions A and B. J) If the leaders move, the followers must Turn up the top cards of die piles at positions C and D, showing that the colors have magically switched to follow the leaders. Place the cards you have just turned up onto the cards at positions A and B. However, the cards are...

Up and Down Mixtant

This is an elaboration on the preceding item. Here, the cards are not only interlaced by color, but by orientation. This also appeared in Scattershot. Again, eight spot cards of medium value are used. The cards are held face-up, four blacks in the right hand, four reds in the left. Display the cards, then flip the reds face-down. Bring die hands together, apparently to place the right hand's cards onto the left's. In fact, the right hand buckles die lowermost card of its stock, and the left...

Phil Goldstein

In his first major collection, Phil Goldstein has sifted through the hundreds and hundreds of fine card effects he has invented over the years, and has chosen 60 of his best tricks and routines. These 60 tricks have been designed to combine simplicity and directness with maximum magical effect on an audience. Among the many excellent tricks explained in this volume, Mr. Goldstein has finally parted with Impressions, a routine with which he has baffled the world's leading magicians. A joker...

Picasso Aces

This is my approach to die Lin Searles Ultimate Aces plot, an ace assembly in which the backs of the aces contrast in color with the rest of the cards. When this routine was devised, I was familiar with only die Vernon and Kane versions. Since then, I have seen other fine solutions, notably by Bruce Cervon. However, this one is still my favorite. It first appeared in my 1979 booklet, Gallery. You will need a red-backed deck, plus six blue-backed cards four aces, plus two indifferent cards....

Face

Place the pack into a red-backed case. Have on hand a regular blue-backed deck, which includes the joker plus a normal trey of spades, and you are set to begin. The patter starts, I am always searching for new and interesting things to do with playing cards. One approach is to look at other areas of show business, to find out what is successful. The theory is that if something is commercial and popular in one area of show business, it ought to be equally commercial when applied to playing...

Five Card Polka

It revolves around an elaborate patter story, which concerns a gambler vacationing in Warsaw He's been there about two weeks and he's itching to play some cards. He goes to the bellhop at his hotel and says, 'I can't stand it anymore I gotta find some poker.' The bellhop replies, 'No problem. Go to room 311 at five o'clock.' Well, it's only noon, so he's got five hours to wait. The minutes tick slowly by, and finally it's five, so he runs upstairs to room 311,...

Two Cards Coming Together

This is a sequence using just the four aces, which can be used as a prelude to Twisting the Aces. Overture, inspired by a Robert Walker plot, was published in the March, 1981 issue of Genii. It is a transposition effect in which the face-up red aces magically change positions with the face-down black aces. Display the four aces. Openly place the red aces face-up between the two face-down black aces. Pause to display die situation. Then square the packet. Perform a Jordan Count, as follows The...

Y

Forefinger presses up, causing the card to snap over to die right, as in figure 20. If you now push upward with the left fingers, the card is brought square with the rest of the packet (figure 27). The side of the right hand screens this action. Mimic the extraction and toss of the second null card. Count die cards legitimately, in the same fashion used with the previous counts. Five cards show the four face-up kings with a single face-down card at center. Turn over the face-down card,...

SecA ruoF

In the early 1970's I hit upon the notion of doing a rudiment r)' Ace Assembly in reverse. The resulting routine was published in my first set of lecture notes, Card Tricks far People Who Don't Do Card Tricks and Some for Those Who Do in 1974. Although I was surely not the first to come up with this basic idea (for example, Dai Vernon told me he had experimented with it back in the 1930's), T do seem to be die first to have set die concept into print. Several years later there was a sudden...

Hopscotch Again

This version first appeared in the November, 1983 issue of New Tops. The same five cards are used, diis time starting in descending sequence with the ace at the face. Display the cards. Then turn the packet face-down and deal the cards into a row from right to left. As with the previous routine, the first card is dealt from the bottom. The spectators believe the order of the row is, from left to right ace, deuce, trey, four, five. The true order is deuce, trey, four, five, ace. Openly exchange...

Con Sequence

The starting point for this routine was Brother Hamman's Amorphous Ace. In the early 1970's, a related routine by Persi Diaconis travelled quickly through the card underground. Many variations ensued, notably by Bruce Cervon, Larry Jennings and Derek Dingle. The basic effect involved a packet of cards in numerical sequence. Each card in turn was used for an individual effect, then discarded, until only one card remained. For the climax, the face of this last card changed color. The following...