Turnover Showing

Hopscotch Again

This version first appeared in the November, 1983 issue of New Tops. The same five cards are used, diis time starting in descending sequence with the ace at the face. Display the cards. Then turn the packet face-down and deal the cards into a row from right to left. As with the previous routine, the first card is dealt from the bottom. The spectators believe the order of the row is, from left to right ace, deuce, trey, four, five. The true order is deuce, trey, four, five, ace. Openly exchange...

Two Cards Coming Together

This is a sequence using just the four aces, which can be used as a prelude to Twisting the Aces. Overture, inspired by a Robert Walker plot, was published in the March, 1981 issue of Genii. It is a transposition effect in which the face-up red aces magically change positions with the face-down black aces. Display the four aces. Openly place the red aces face-up between the two face-down black aces. Pause to display die situation. Then square the packet. Perform a Jordan Count, as follows The...

Picasso Aces

This is my approach to die Lin Searles Ultimate Aces plot, an ace assembly in which the backs of the aces contrast in color with the rest of the cards. When this routine was devised, I was familiar with only die Vernon and Kane versions. Since then, I have seen other fine solutions, notably by Bruce Cervon. However, this one is still my favorite. It first appeared in my 1979 booklet, Gallery. You will need a red-backed deck, plus six blue-backed cards four aces, plus two indifferent cards....

Five Card Polka

It revolves around an elaborate patter story, which concerns a gambler vacationing in Warsaw He's been there about two weeks and he's itching to play some cards. He goes to the bellhop at his hotel and says, 'I can't stand it anymore I gotta find some poker.' The bellhop replies, 'No problem. Go to room 311 at five o'clock.' Well, it's only noon, so he's got five hours to wait. The minutes tick slowly by, and finally it's five, so he runs upstairs to room 311,...

Con Sequence

The starting point for this routine was Brother Hamman's Amorphous Ace. In the early 1970's, a related routine by Persi Diaconis travelled quickly through the card underground. Many variations ensued, notably by Bruce Cervon, Larry Jennings and Derek Dingle. The basic effect involved a packet of cards in numerical sequence. Each card in turn was used for an individual effect, then discarded, until only one card remained. For the climax, the face of this last card changed color. The following...

Impressions

There have been many versions of Karl Fulves' Universal Card plot, in which one card (usually a joker) transforms into a duplicate of several selections in turn. Most have employed methods involving misprinted cards, which forbid the display of the full face of the Universal Card, or of its subject card, and sometimes of both. I wanted to devise an approach that allowed both cards to be fully displayed at the same time. This was the result. In the 1970's, I performed this routine at many...

Chromavator

This is another approach to the preceding plot, this time with a straightforward Elevator approach, using only lour cards. It first appeared in the June, 1982 Magic Manuscript. You will need the ace, two, three and four of clubs. The four has an odd-colored back. During the routine, the odd-colored back remains hidden until its exposure for a surprise finish. At the start of the routine, the cards are in sequence from the face four, three, two, ace. Begin by fanning the packet face-up,...

Spiralvator

We'll now return to material using four blacks and four reds, this time a packet approach to the Elevator plot. I developed a version of this in the late 1970's, but it required duplicate cards. Later, I returned to the problem and created this variation using normal cards. Tt was published in the August, 1986 Genii. Again, medium-value cards should be used. The black set must contain the seven and eight of clubs. The starting order is, from the face black, black, eight of clubs, seven of...

Up and Down Mixtant

This is an elaboration on the preceding item. Here, the cards are not only interlaced by color, but by orientation. This also appeared in Scattershot. Again, eight spot cards of medium value are used. The cards are held face-up, four blacks in the right hand, four reds in the left. Display the cards, then flip the reds face-down. Bring die hands together, apparently to place the right hand's cards onto the left's. In fact, the right hand buckles die lowermost card of its stock, and the left...