Soc Ii

The summer of 1972 found me visiting Simon Aronson in Chicago. Two other magicians and myself got together at Simon's place for a magic session. One of the effects presented, was SOC, an Edward Marlo routine. Well, I forgot it as time passed. Then one day about a year later when I was hanging around Eagle Magic in Minneapolis someone asked about a book that was on sale. The book happened to be Coining Magic. Seeing the author's name to be Edward Marlo, I said it would be an excellent book to...

Introduction

The focus of this book is coin manipulation. While most effects use normal coins, there are a number of items using gaffs. The book begins with a presentation on theory. The idea behind this is that little can be accomplished without some understanding of what is transpiring in the minds of the spectator and the magician. Then, in the next couple of sections, moves basic to the performance of many effects in the book are presented. This book attempts to be self-contained, not requiring the...

Dynamic Coin

The Dynamic Coin was initially part of a larger routine with several coins. This was the Dynamic Coin Routine in my parade of tricks in the Linking Ring in 1972. I used just the part with one coin when I was hanging around with friends and required to do something. However, as time passed the one coin routine grew. This routine solves the problem of what to do when you only have one coin. If you just vanish one coin, they will usually say, It's in the other hand. Well, this routine solves that...

Quick Shot

I have always thought of using the glass through the table routine, but have never thought the routine logical. Also I have always liked Milton Kort's Coins Through the Table routine in Bobo's Modern Coin Magic. Here I am blending the two together to make a good routine with a solid finish. Here we use white magicians wax on the face of the coin. A small piece of double-sided tape will do also. Before performance, one of the regular coins can be placed against the wax or tape to prevent dust...

Three Halves Through

What would a coin book be without a coins through the table routine So, here is another for the bunch. Many penetration routines seem to me to be a bit contrived. They seem to focus the attention of the audience on the coins going under the table and not on the coins above the table. This author believes the spectator's are more concerned about the coins above the table. Here I am making an attempt to keep the attention of the audience on the hand which is above the table in hopes the audience...

Crossed Cards Ii

Carroll Hovland always liked Crossed Cards. One day Larry Kahlow, the owner of Eagle Magic in Minneapolis, noticed that the coins turned over when the coins were loaded under the cards. This suggests that three different coins can be used. Well, Carroll pursued the concept coming up with this routine. It's really a mixture of many moves that have come before, but they all work together pleasantly. Carroll elected to use a move in which one can show the underside of a card empty even though...

Crossed Cards I

My real education on coin work began with Bobo's Modern Coin Magic. The effect of this book on me is very apparent as almost all of my material with coins had its beginning on those pages. One effect which always intrigued me was the appearance of half dollars under four cards placed on the table. I had trouble classic palming four coins. Then dropping them one at a time to load under a card was unthinkable. After much practice I finally managed to do it, but my hand appeared as if it were...

Quick Centavos

This routine is another step in the search for the perfect coins across routine. This time we introduce a gimmicked coin. The idea is to use the best of the foregoing methods and use a gimmick for a solid finish. Here we use a regular shell, not an expanded one. A regular shell has an advantage over the expanded shells. They tend to like normal coins. Most expanded shells I've had look a bit odd. I've had laymen call me on them They say, what's wrong with that coin, it looks fat Magic dealers...

Quick Silver

My involvement with this routine began at an IBM convention in Milwaukee, in 1969. I was talking to Larry Jennings about the Matrix coin trick. He expressed the opinion that perhaps it wasn't involved enough. Well, Matrix was a fixed routine with me. I didn't want to experiment with it. So, I sat down attempting to come up with an involved routine. The result was the Dynamic Coin Routine, which I put in a one man Linking Ring Parade in August 1972. During the development of the routine much...

Hand Load

This move is basically from Bobo's book Modern Coin Magic. The move is credited to Milton Kort of Detroit. He does the move from thumb palm, whereas I am doing it from the classic palm position. 1. Begin the move with the left fist palm down. The right hand has a coin Classic Palmed. The right hand is also palm down. The tips of the two middle fingers of the right hand touch the back of the left hand far on the left side, Fig. 45 . The fingers of the right tap twice. After tapping, the fingers...

Twirl Load

This is a move, which can be quite useful in routines with coins and cards. This move was an attempt to duplicate the card loading moves from Bobo's book. I have been playing with this move for about ten years. I had the move down well. Magicians would compliment me on the smoothness of execution, but there was something missing. The Body Language was not correct. Only recently I came up with an extra detail that really makes the move. I was teaching the move to one of my student's in my magic...

Popupcoin Move

This sleight allows you to apparently place two coins into your hand, one at a time. The spectator believes they see both coins fall into the hand, whereas only one falls. This move is basically a sponge ball move that appears in the Tarbell Course on magic, and also like the basic sleight from Three Ball Transposition, a beautiful effect from The Dai Vernon Book of Magic. In this handling, coins instead of sponges or balls are used. As a coin move, it is not new to the magic world. I have been...

Finger Clip Vanish

Well now, I just pulled out my copy of Modern Coin Magic by Bobo to find out where this vanish came from. It's not in the book. At least it is not under vanishes. I don't know where I got it. I suspect I developed it along the way or someone showed it to me. I have been doing this vanish since back in 1961. It's the first decent vanish I mastered. It has a few problems. First, it leaves you in an awkward position. Your hand is contorted with a coin in finger clip position. There isn't much you...

Snap Back Vanish

The snap back vanish is a novelty vanish which I use only occasionally. It has powerful visual retention capability. This vanish is very useful when not doing some serious kind of magic routine. Use it for an interlude where the audience perceives that you are just playing with your magic ability. 1. Hold the coin about chest high. The coin is primarily held by the first finger and thumb. The second finger should be touching the coin, Fig. 12 . 2. The left hand fingers move in front of the...

Schneider Vanish

This vanish is simple, powerful and embodies the principles presented in the previous chapter. It embodies intention of reality, a very good demonstration of body language and one point in beat misdirection. The Schneider Vanish is a unique vanish. It can be done surrounded. It can be done with anything from a coin, to golf ball, to egg, and it is virtually perfect as often the spectator sees the object fly into the other hand. Indeed even magicians who do it and watch other magicians do it...

Schneider Classic Vanish

This vanish evolved in an attempt to solve some problems with the Schneider Vanish. Often in my coin work I must vanish a coin, then immediately pick up something with the hand that palmed the coin. The simple finger palm was sometimes a bit awkward. The Classic Palm however, allowed the hand to move freely, so I took a look at it. The vanish which resulted duplicates the real motion of a coin moved from one hand to another. Of course coin vanishes wherein the coin ends up in the Classic Palm...