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This is an encore to "Free-Flight" (see Index) - where four coins end up under a spectator's hand. In this finale to the finale the card that was used to cover the coins appears under the spectator's hand!

6TELP ONlL - Your three coins have just assembled under one card. Pick up the coins with your right hand and pretend to place it into your left - retaining the coin in a right fin-ger-palm (or dropping it to a finger-palm from a classic-palm).

6TE-P TW/O - Pick up the card by sliding it with your right thumb onto the finger-palmed coin.

6TLP TiJR-LL - Slide the left side of the card (and the concealed coin under the remaining three coins, using the card to slide the coins over to a spectator (FIG. 1).

5TLP FOUR. - Direct the spectator to place her hand flat onto the coins - so that all the coins are covered.

6TLP FIN/E. - As she presses her hand down onto the coins slide the card out, leaving the fourth coin under her hand.

6TLP ¿>IX - She will not feel this fourth coin under her hand because of the other coins on top of it.

6TE.P 6EVE.nI - Balance the card on top of your closed left fist. Slowly open your left fingers so that the card lands flat onto your palm - covering what should be the coin.

5TLP □¿¡"LIT - Curl your left fingers in to clip the outer side of the card between your first and second finger. Lift the card up with these two fingers to reveal the vanish.

5TLP ML - Drop the card face up onto the deck - to lead into Michael's Proposition.

±>TLP TE.Nl — Pick up the deck in your left hand and obtain a left little-finger break below the second card from the top.

6TE.P LLL\/E.lsl - Riffle the deck toward the spectator's hand. As she lifts up her hand to discover the four coins, turn the face-up card face down onto the deck and grasp the double from above the break by its ends with your right fingers.

6TE.P TW/E-LN/E. - Put the deck aside with your left hand while the right hand places the face-down double onto the table in front of you.

6TE.P TJ-llR-TEENJ - Place each one of the coins on a corner of the double as you say "leaving us with all four coins neatly arranged in a perfect square - symbolic of the square deal you always get with..." (fill in the blank with the name of your spectator, host, or organization).

Any other line which gives you an excuse to place the four coins onto the corners of the double will work just as well. Note that the coins are "square" with the corners (FIG. 2).

6TE-P FOUR.TE-E.Nl - Direct the spectator to cross one hand over the other (do it yourself as an example). Comment that this time the coins will be covered with both of the spectator's hands, making it impossible to get to the coins without the aid of a crowbar or a blowtorch.

5TE.P FIFTEEN - After the spectator places her crossed hands onto the four coins (make sure her hands completely cover the double) say, "OOPS - I forgot the card." Direct your spectator to lift up one side of her hand just enough for you to get the card. Do so by pinching one edge of the double between your right thumb and first finger - and slide out the bottom card of the double. The weight of the spectator's hand will keep the coins and card in place.

The four coins at the card's corners will prevent the spectator from feeling the card. Try it yourself just so you know I'm not kidding (FIG. 3).

5TE.P 5IXTE-E.Nl - Place the card into the deck and riffle the deck toward the spectator's hand. Ask her if she can still feel the coins. She will say "yes." Ask her if she can still feel the card. She will say "Huh?." Tell her to take a look. She will be amazed and delighted and grateful for the chance to have met you.

OFFICIAL NlOTICE. OF APPRECIATION! - For Michael Ammar!

One day Michael said "Hey Paul - why don't you just use a double during Free-Flight and load one of the cards under a spectator's hand as she covers the coins. I said, "Gee whiz Michael - why didn't I think of that?" Michael said, "Because your initials aren't M.A."

Upon getting over this injustice of life I worked out the four-corner handling and lifted a Derek Dingle coins-across theory for the open removal of the card.

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