Proclpurl

6TLP ¿7hJL - For illustration, we will assume there are two cards in the left hand, and you want to want to make one of them vanish. The subtleties begin immediately. You won't want to just lever the card up into the position shown in FIG. 4. Since that would be exactly the opposite of what accomplishes the vanish, you don't want the impression to enter their mind.

Begin by pushing the top card over with the left thumb (FIG. 1). The right hand takes it with the thumb on the face of the card, fingers on top. This is the same beginning movement for turning a card face up onto the table, but instead of turning it face up, you'll be turning it end for end. FIGS. 2, 3, show the right hand taking, turning and bracing the card upright with the left thumb.

The left middle, third, and little fingers bow the card against the thumb, while the index finger extends straight out (FIG. 4).

5TLP ~[\JO - The right hand approaches the left to take the card, but instead of just covering the card with the cupped hand, you'll want to create a sort of visual retention. FIG. 5 shows how the right hand approaches with the index and middle fingers widely separated. This provides a lingering view of the card you'll apparently palm.

6TLP TilR-LL - Now several things will happen at once; initiated by the right fingers closing over the card. The left thumbtip goes into the crotch of the right thumb, as the left fingers snap the card held by the thumb flush onto the card held in the palm (FIG. 6).

FIG. 7 shows the right hand starting to move away in a cupped position, as if palming the card. Another important subtlety is shown in FIG. 8. The left thumb remains up, as a final reminder marking the previous location of the "palmed" card. The fact that it remains up implies the card was taken up and away from that spot.

FIG. 7 shows the right hand starting to move away in a cupped position, as if palming the card. Another important subtlety is shown in FIG. 8. The left thumb remains up, as a final reminder marking the previous location of the "palmed" card. The fact that it remains up implies the card was taken up and away from that spot.

AT LP FOUR. - At this point it might seem we've done all we could to convince them the card was taken by the right hand, but there's more. Paul continues by emphasizing the "singularity" of the "card" remaining in the left hand. Personally, I find this part tough to do flawlessly 100% of the time, but Paul can and does. He gives the spectators credit for intelligence. Once they see the card is not visible in the right hand, they might naturally assume it's still in the hand they saw it in last. So, rather than saying, "...and there's only one card over here!", he continues by handling the double as you'd think only a single card could be handled.

Moving from the position shown in FIG. 8, the left index finger moves underneath the two cards. To keep them flush, brace the long edges of the cards between the base of the thumb and the left fingers. As soon as you can, move the pad of the left thumb to the left long edge of the cards (FIG. 9). Bow the cards outwards, as in FIG. 10, and allow the right long edges to snap off the left fingertips (FIG. 11). As you do, pinch the cards strongly between the left thumb and index finger to keep the cards squared up. Paul ends by snapping the cards with the forefinger hand, as in

Palm" (next effect) for the current evolution of pretending to conceal cardboard within the folds of your flesh. Or for the real thing see "Flesh."
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