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t>JLP fO\XZ. - Take the loose leaf back with your right hand, and place it onto the left fingers (FIGS. 3,4). Notice that if you completely released the hidden leaf it would come to rest in the same position as the visible leaf. There can't be a visible change in position when you do the switch.

6TC.P FIVE. - Gently stroke the visible leaf with your right fingers (FIG. 5).

When the leaf is completely hidden from view, clip it with your right thumb and steal it away (FIG. 6) as you allow the hidden leaf to spring out from between your left fingers. The stroking action should never pause, and there is no visible change of any kind. From the audience's point of view, you are simply stroking the marked leaf. (What we are trying to say, is that with a little practice and experimentation, this is a perfect slow-motion switch.)

6TC.P ¿IX - Rub the leaf gently with your left thumb. Then tug on it a little. At first, people will think you are faking this somehow, and that's good. Let them. Rub a bit more, tug again, then hesitantly release the leaf. (Don't let the branch go yet.)

6TELP 6C.\/E.Nl - Have someone else gently touch the healed leaf. "Be careful. It'll be fragile for a few minutes..." Then let go of the branch allowing it to waft back into it's natural position. Pick up the marker with your right hand and pocket it along with the extra vegetation.

6TE.P UgJT - Be silent. Give your aston-ishee space to experience the moment.

You can mark the leaf with a prediction as in "Torn Mentalist" (see Index) - or go for a more organic mark by previously creating a small "natural" hole in both leaves. Point out the "completely solid leaf" - and hope your spectator notices the hole. If not, casually notice it yourself.

cl0sl-up TANTA6IL5 HNlALE. (I 98 I)

Originally published by Chuck Martinez tuel b>izar.r.^ vanii^jj m

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