Spectator Card

Three Cards Across

This trick is one of the finest in all card magic. When neatly presented it never fails to entertain and mystify an audience. It was a favourite with the great English magician, David Devant, and with countless card conjurers since. The plot is simple. A spectator counts off a number of cards and puts them in his pocket or holds them in his hands. A second spectator chooses a card, the value of which is used to indicate how many cards shall be caused to fly invisibly to the cards held by the...

Charlier Shuffle

How Shuffle Cards Overhand

This shuffle is also called the haymow shuffle. It is unique among card sleights in that neatness of execution is not required in fact, it is most effective when done rather clumsily. Although expert cardmen affect to disdain it for that reason, the wise operator values it for its effect on laymen, to whom it is the most convincing false shuffle extant. The shuffle, though apparently thoroughly mixing the cards, really leaves them in the same condition that a simple complete cut would do. The...

Overhand Shuffle Practice Routine

The best method of practising the various overhand shuffles is to go through them in sequence as follows 1. Turn the top card face upward. 2. Shuffle it to the bottom and back to the top again. 3. Shuffle it to the bottom. Shuffle again, retaining it there, then shuffle it back to the top. 4. Reverse the card now at the bottom. Shuffle, retaining the top and bottom cards in position. 5. Shuffle the top card to the next to bottom and back to the top. The two reversed cards should be at the top...

Poker Players Picnic

Taking a pack of cards which has been thoroughly shuffled, a spectactor cuts it into four piles. Turning the top card of each packet himself, he finds that he has actually cut to the four aces. Preparation. If you make this your first trick, you must beforehand place the four aces on the top of the pack. If you wish to do it following other tricks, or with a borrowed deck, then you must get the aces to the top secretly. Never attempt to do that furtively. Run over the faces of the cards,...

Design for Laughter

This is a trick in which the magician appears unknowingly to have made a mistake which ensures the failure of his feat. The more certain the spectators are of this, the more they enjoy his predicament and the more astonished and appreciative they are when the trick proves to be successful after all. 1. First shuffle the pack, then have a spectator choose a card freely. Have him show the card to everyone while you turn your head away. This is important, for all must know the card or they will...

The Observation Test

The glide, as we have shown, is a useful sleight with which many effects can be had. Here is another use to which it can be put-one that enables you to vanish one card and make another appear in its place. 1. Shuffle the pack, have a card drawn and noted, and when it is replaced control it to the face of the pack by means of the overhand shuffle control. 2. Turn the pack with the face toward yourself, so that no one can see the cards, and run through them, removing the four twospots and placing...

Tipsy Trick

A chosen card is found reversed in the deck under peculiar circumstances. The trick is an amusing one and is used by many of the best card conjurers in their intimate performances. 1. Magicians often have disconcerting adventures. I would like to show you something that happened to me the other night. To illustrate the mishap exactly, will you select a card Offer the deck to a spectator and have a card chosen. 2. Remember that card, please. Better show it to the others so that they can enjoy...

Egyptian Pocket

This feat is one of the few that are suitable for the stage or platform only. It was one of Alexander Herrmann's favourites, and he it was who gave it the name by which it has been known ever since. Successful presentation of the trick calls for considerable address rather than technical skill. The effect is that a spectator takes a pack of cards and has four cards freely selected by four other spectators. He collects the cards, and they are replaced in the deck, which is then shuffled and...

Cards to the Pocket

This trick is a favourite with cardmen, who have found that it has a fascination for audiences. A number of cards vanish from the left hand and one by one find their way into an empty pocket. The trick is unusual in that it is equally suitable for large or small audiences. It has been said that a performer's worth can be determined by his presentation of this feat, for it calls for a skilled technique, an interesting presentation, and the ability to make credible a feat which logic rejects as...

Poker Puzzle

Can you deal a good poker hand is a question which is almost certain to be asked after you have shown your prowess with cards. The routine which follows has been arranged to convince the questioner that you can. 1. Can I deal a good poker hand you repeat. The answer to that is--yes and no. I'd better show you what I mean. No doubt you've read articles on the methods used by the gamblers --everyone has heard of second dealing and bottom dealing, although very few persons have seen these...

Circus Card Trick

In the old days this trick was used by cardsharpers to fleece the unwary. It is an amusing swindle for use with a small group when presented as legitimate entertainment. 1. Have someone shuffle the pack, and in taking it back glimpse the bottom card for use as a key card. Spread the cards and ask a spectator to remove one, having him show it to everyone. This is important, for later you may need witnesses. 2. Have the card replaced, and place the key card above it by using the key undercut...

Ladies Looking Glass

Baskets For Pegboard

This fanciful title was given to the feat by its inventor, Comte, a famous French magician who flourished in the early years of the nineteenth century. The trick is one of the great card tricks, and we have retained the title but somewhat modified the procedure. Four spectators each remove a pair of cards from the deck, which are then replaced and the deck shuffled. Three of the pairs appear in rapid succession at the top and bottom of the deck, and the magician tosses the cards into the air...

Grays Spelling Trick

A spectator replaces a selected card in the pack, which is honestly squared and shuffled. The name of the card is then spelled mentally by the spectator, who applies one letter to each card dealt by the magician. On reaching the last letter the spectator calls Stop He names his card. The last card dealt is turned face upwards and proves to be the very card he selected. 1. Hand the deck to a spectator and have him shuffle the cards thoroughly. Take the pack back, glimpsing the bottom card, and...

Do It and Fail

The trick which we now give you is one that has challenged the wits of many thousands of persons. It is especially suitable for use after dessert, when the company is relaxed, the talk is general, and everyone is in a congenial mood. It is not a trick for a set performance. The trick is One that people remember. One famous magician, while making an ocean voyage, performed it at the dinner table every night at the insistence of his fellow voyagers, and years later shipboard acquaintances would...

Justice Card Trick

Card tricks that are performed while the magician is blindfolded make a particularly profound impression upon laymen. For this reason it is a good plan to include one such trick in a routine of card tricks. 1. Ask someone in the gathering to assist you, and when you have a volunteer place him on the left side of your table while you stand behind it. Have him shuffle the deck, and when you take it back glimpse the bottom card. Let us say it is the four of spades. Force this card upon your...

Topsy Turvy Cards

It is always a good rule to begin a series of card feats with a short, startling effect, one that will arouse the interest of the onlookers immediately and stimulate their interest in the marvels to follow. In this effect one half of the pack is placed face to face with the other half, yet, on the word of command, the cards right themselves so that all of them face the same way. Whenever possible you should use a borrowed deck, and we shall suppose that one has been handed to you with the...

Everywhere and Nowhere

Nothing is quite so amazing to the general public as witnessing the mysterious transformation of one card to another perhaps that is because it so nearly approximates the popular concept of magic. Here we have a fine feat of this type. The magician, attempting to find a chosen card, shows three indifferent cards. Each of these, a moment later, is shown to be the chosen card still a moment later, everything is as it should be, with the chosen card flanked by two indifferent cards. You will...

Everybodys Card I

Card tricks may come and card tricks may go, but the really great card classics go on forever. This feat has been performed by countless magicians for almost a century and no doubt will be charming audiences a hundred years hence. Robert-Houdin, who included it in his programmes under the title The Metamorphoses, writes of it, I may once more remark that this trick, skilfully executed, is one of the most surprising that can well be performed. The authors can only urge their readers to master...

Obliging Aces

I wouldn't want to play cards with you is a statement inevitably addressed to a good cardman at some time or other. A good trick to use after someone has made this remark is the following easy feat, which has all the appearance of great skill. Preparation. Secretly place any nine-spot at the ninth position from the top, with the four aces immediately following it. To do this while openly toying with the cards and carrying on your part in the general conversation, spread the cards with the...

Introduction

The first exposition of the principles of card magic was published in 1769 by the French writer Guyot, and he it was who first laid down the dictum that mastery of the pass is the first requisite of the art of conjuring with cards. His actual words were Before risking an attempt at these kinds of Recreations, you must know how to make the pass. All succeeding French writers on the subject followed his lead and insisted that the pass is the first essential. Professor Hoffmann, whose book Modern...

Telepathy Plus

Having turned the conversation to the subject of mind reading, an easy matter at the present time, ask permission to attempt an experiment of that nature. Explain that you have had some success with objects that can be pictured mentally and pretend to select with great care some person as concentrator and transmitter. 1. Hand him a pack of cards and have him shuffle it thoroughly, then instruct him to deal a row of five spot cards of differing suits and values. If picture cards or cards of the...

Conus Ace Trick

The number of four-ace tricks is now almost legion, but one of the first and still the best is the one devised by the French conjurer Conus a century ago. With slight modification the trick is as effective today as it ever was. The plot, as in all great tricks, is simple The four aces are transformed in a spectator's hands into four other cards, and they are finally found in one of his pockets. Preparation. You will need a deck of cards and four duplicate aces. On the top of the deck place the...

Spectators Card Trick

Sooner or later you will meet the man who insists upon taking the pack in his own hands and then challenges you to do a trick. The following feat is useful on such occasions 1. Secretly glimpse the top card of the pack, which we will say is the four of hearts. False shuffle the cards, retaining the four of hearts at the top. 2. Hand the pack to a spectator, saying, It is curious that so many people suspect a magician of conniving and subterfuge. I assure you that the things I do simply happen--...

Off Agin On Agin Finnegin

When the student has progressed to the point of making the transposition of the two packets fairly smoothly, the following feat will afford excellent practice A spectator shuffles the deck, which is then placed on the magician's left hand. The magician cuts at any point indicated by the spectator, and the spectator removes the top card of the lower packet, notes what it is, and replaces it. By simply tapping the back of the card with the packet he holds, the magician causes the noted card to...