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NF. "Card in rhc Ringbox" was the brilliant creation and a favorite trick of Fred mW&xA "While Mr. Kapss original method was quite convincing and its effect

KffiyT astonishing, I believe I have added a few touches that bring the illusion closer to the ideal. I know with utter certainty that the trick is strong—so strong that I close ninety percent of my close-up sets with it.

For those who may not be familiar with die Kaps trick, die effect is concisely told by its ride. A card is freely choscn, signed by the person who selected it and lost back in the deck Then a small ringbox, which has been sitting in full view the entire time, is opened. Inside is a folded card. When this card is removed and unfolded, it is seen to be the spectators signed selection! The performers handling of the cards and box is so open and straightforward, no explanation for the magical appearance of the card in the box seems possible.

A major part of the secret resides in the litde wooden ringbox used. While the box itself is not gimmicked in the usual sense of that word, it is neverdieless very carefully designed for its intended job. Because of the precise requirements for the construction of this box, it is extremely unlikely that one will be found ready-made that fits the prerequisites. Please don't make the error of thinking you can adapt a box that is ''close". The details of construction make a big difference in how the box works in performance. Therefore, you will have to construct the box to order, as I did, or have it constructed for you. Because of this, I will provide exact measurements. (My American readers must forgive me here for using the metric system. The box was constructed using precise metric measurements, and the equivalents in inches are too awkward to be useful. Example: 30 mm. = 1.18".)

I have made the box as small as possible, as the smaller it is, the less room there seems to be for trickery; thus the better the effect will be. To keep the size of the box to a minimum, it is constructed from veneer. This allows the walls to be quite thin while it maximizes the available space inside the box. Although one might think walls of thin veneer would result in a very fragile box, such is not the case. The box I made in 1979 has been in constant use for more than sixteen years, and it still works perfectly and looks as good as new.

The box is forty-five mm. in both length and width, and thirty mm. high.The base of the box represents sixteen mm. of this height, the lid fourteen mm. The lid is beveled to taper 111, starting six mm. above the lip and narrowing to a top that measures thirty mm. square (Figure 1).

The base of the box has an inner lip, three mm. high This lip assures dial when the lid is closed it fits squarely and surely on the base (Figure 2). This fit is close, but not snug. It is imperative that the lid be able to swing open and closed without the least binding.

The lid of the box also has a small round knob, which is glued to its front and projects a bit beyond the edge of the lid.This can be fashioned from an earring ornament. The knob is not simply decorative, but performs an important function, which I will explain shortly.

The lid is attached to the base with a silk hinge at the back. The strip of silk is not merely glued inside die box; it is glued between the layers of veneer from which the box is constructed. I have used fairly heavy silk for diis, as it stands up well to a lot of use, yet is very pliant. A silk hinge also assures that, once again, the lid can swing freely open and shut without the slightest impedance.

The inside surfaces ol both lid and base are lined with j brown, self-adhesive felt. A pad of diis brown felt is then fitted inside the base. This pad is made from two squares of felt with their sticky surfaces put together. Before you join die two felt squares, slip a small loop of thin, transparent, nylon thread around one of the squares, then trap it in place between the two sticky surfaces (Figure 3). Place this completed pad, dnead-side up, into the base of the box. The pad must fit snugly, so that it will not drop out; yet, by gripping the thread, the pad can be pulled from die base if necessary.

The final bit of preparation is to fold a playing card—one with a back design matching the deck you will use in performance—into eighths (twicc widthwise and once lengthwise) with the back outward. Slip one end of the folded card under the thread loop,

taper 111, starting six mm. above the lip and narrowing to a top that measures thirty mm. square (Figure 1).

The base of the box has an inner lip, three mm. high This lip assures dial when the lid is closed it fits squarely and surely on the base (Figure 2). This fit is close, but not snug. It is imperative that the lid be able to swing open and closed without the least binding.

The lid of the box also has a small round knob, which is glued to its front and projects a bit beyond the edge of the lid.This can be fashioned from an earring ornament. The knob is not simply dccorativc, but performs an important function, which I will explain shortly.

The lid is attached to the base with a silk hinge at the back. The strip of silk is not merely glued inside die box; it is glued between the layers of veneer from which the box is constructed. I have used fairly heavy silk for diis, as it stands up well to a lot of use, yet is very pliant. A silk hinge also assures that, once again, the lid can swing freely open and shut without the slightest impedance.

The inside surfaces ol both lid and base are lined with j brown, self-adhesive felt. A pad of diis brown felt is then fitted inside the base. This pad is made from two squares of felt with their sticky surfaces put together. Before you join die two felt squares, slip a small loop of thin, transparent, nylon thread around one of the squares, then trap it in placc between the two sticky surfaces (Figure 3). Place this completed pad, diread-side up, into the base of the box. The pad must fit snugly, so that it will not drop out; yet, by gripping the thread, the pad can be pulled from die base if necessary.

The final bit of preparation is to fold a playing card—one with a back design matching the deck you will use in performance—into eighths (twice widthwise and once lengthwise) with the back outward. Slip one end of the folded card under the thread loop,

table (Figure 5). While your right hand tables the deck, extend your left forefinger and use its tip to catch the left edge of the box lid. Then pull rhe lid open and back, exposing the folded card inside (Figure 6).

Shake the box a bit, displaying the seemingly loose card inside. This action assures diat everyone focuses their attention on the box and ignores your right hand as it tables the deck.

Now move your right hand forward and toward your left hand (Figure 7, palmed card exposed for clarity). As the hands converge, simultaneously turn the left hand palm down, tipping the box over, just as you would if you were spilling its contents into the cupped right fingers (Figure 8). Thanks to the free movement of the silk hinge, the lid of die box will automatically swing down. At the same time, turn your right liand palm up to meet the box, while opening your fingers. The result is diat, as the lid swings shut, it closes over the finger-palmed card, catching it like a little mouth (Figure 9).

Immediately raise the left hand with the box and card as you lower the right hand. When done correcdy there is no impression of your bringing your hands together. Rather, the left hand moves upward to tip the card from the box, and die right hand swings forward and under the box to catch the card. As die hands move smoothly into position, they

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