The ME Pras

ETr me explain how I developed ' The Tamed Card, the routine for 'Wild Card I you are about to read. I think the story will hold some interest for you, since the WfcyScl evolution of the roudne shows clearly why the routine is constructed as it is. In addition, you can see how the creative process worked inside my head. It was around 1968,1 think, when I bought my first ''Wild Card set from a dealer in Amsterdam. The instructions accompanying the cards described what is more or less the...

When Smart People Suggest Stupid Solutions

I've frequendy wondered why people sometimes come up with painfully silly solutions and don't stop to realize it. If they would give the matter more thought they would quickly see that their solution couldn't possibly work. I believe their reasoning runs something like this The moment a spectator sees a magical effect that he doesn't understand, he is confronted with a problem, a problem that stands square in front of him like a granite boulder. He can't budge it. It's there and will always be...

Design Toco

This second design is much easier to make and replace than the first, and it accommodates a variety of card cases that feature a reproduction of die back pattern on die deck. Bicycle, Tally-ho and other popular brands have such cases. While the illusion created by this second method is slighdy less effective, due to the fact that the fidl-sizcd ease cannot be displayed as openly, the versatility and ease of construction offered by this design make it attractive. The first step is to cut off the...

Mm

& fS consider once more the uncomfortable performing situation discussed in the preceeding article, one that happens with some frequency to almost every magician You are in the middle of a trick and have reached a point where the audiences attention must be directed elsewhere than your hands, so that you can execute a secret maneuver. I lowever, you note one spectator tenaciously staring at your hands, the danger zone. What do you do You could try to make this spectator look you in the eye...

Prikm Turn

HE erosion of magic, sadly mistaken by some as development, as discussed in the previous essay, occurs in other areas than the showrooms and catalogs of our dealers. Another hotbed of such devolution is the practice of so-called practical thinking. Now, practical thinking certainly has its value, but all to often it is perverted into a negative force. Suppose you have a trick in which you recognize several impractical elements. Its only logical that you should search for ways to eliminate or...

The TWopocket Deck Switch

As already mentioned, the deck you have been performing with must be switched for the gimmick in your jacket pocket. Deck switches are a challenge, especially when you work standing, with no chance for lapping. There is no stock solution to deceptive deck-switching in every situation. The switch must be structured to fit the prevailing circumstances and to take advantage of them. Pockct switches can be problematic, especially when the dccks arc uncased and loose. A standard approach to deck...

TThir Squeeze

In your right hand you hold the miniature case opening outward, with the left thumb pulling the top flap back onto the case and in your left hand you hold the gimmicked deck in dealing position. From the front end the deck looks perfectly normal, and your thumb and fingers, resting along the sides, aid in screening from view the odd shape of the gimmick lying under the covering card. (See page 129 for more information on concealing the nature of the gimmick.) Begin to insert the inner right...

Mmm mkitt

VER the years, many writers of magic have laid great stress on the qualities of simplicity and directness when choosing or conceiving a magical effect. I agree and I disagree, depending on the sense in which the word simplicity is being used. > There is a great difference between an effect that is easy to follow and one that is simple. Certainly an effect should be easy to follow. Otherwise one loses the audience. But should it always be as simple as possible Lets imagine that you wish to...

The in item to

Hartzs Hydrostatic Glass has become a standard of the craft since its invention in the 1800s. It has remained an intrinsically surprising and fascinating iji& M effect to audiences, and over the decades has found a solid place in the reper-toires of professionals and amateurs alike. It is a trick that has certainly been in mine. However, my experience with it, and I'm sure the experience of others too, has shown that the rigid plastic gimmick that makes possible the mysterious suspension...

The Rim Itch m i Wallet

HOPE you all have your hands on your money Echoing the thoughts that many C N tj) persons have when they see a magician, the performer goes on to tell how he ( L vmll was recently robbed in the street. The thief took the performer's ring, his watch and his money. As this story is told, the performer removes his ring from his finger, his watch from his wrist and empties the cash from his wallet. All these articles are clearly placed into a plain pay envelope. But a few seconds later, without the...

Info

Come together for an instant, as if by accident but this fleeting contact goes unnoticed, obscured by the flow of the larger motions. The folded selection now hangs caught between die partially closed lid and the base of the box (Figure 10). This is the crucial job that the box has been constructed to perform. The little knob and the tapered shape of the lid arc carefully designed to assure that the card is caught and held. (A flat-topped lid cannot be depended on to trap the card.) As you hold...

Rkt

T is generally agreed that, within the field of close-up magic, it is best to choose tricks that reset themselves at the end of each performance. The advantages are fyjuBi obvious. Because the trick resets, there is never a need to go off to a dark corner to prepare the props for the next performance. This means that you can continue performing for as long as you wish without ever leaving the room. This looks much more professional. After all, if you must go to the rest room after every set,...

Contents

Introduction The Wonder Years Max Maven xi Prologue.-The Limitations of Theory 1 Chapi er One Attention-getting Devices 7 Getting the Mis Out of Misdirection 9 Chapter Two Travel Tales of Mr. Pip 43 Counting Cards, Unnatural Rhythms and Other Problems 97 Chapter Three The Tamed Card 179 Slow and Steady Wins the Race 209 An Examination of Examinations 214 Chapter Four Presentations in Silver 229 Coins Across and Back with Interlude 231 When Tricks Become Transparent 248 Cigarette Through Quarter...

Euml

HF. performer removes a transparent plastic envelope from his pocket and dis-M amp wr I P y5 lts c ntents one playing card and a twenty dollar bill. nlv the back of fccSyy the card can be seen through the envelope. The per former proposes a small wager to someone in his audience a wager widi no risk to this person. The spectator is to name any card in the deck he wishes. The performer claims that he has already anticipated the spectators selection and placed it in the envelope. If he is wrong,...