The Riffle Stacking Concept

The concept of riffle stacking is a relatively simple one. You have a series of cards, we will say four, on the top of a deck and you wish to position them a certain number of cards apart from one another, we will say you wish to insert three cards between each of the four leaving the fourth of the original cards on the top of the deck. You would then riffle the packets together and as you reached the point where the four cards were stationed on the top of the deck, you would ensure that three...

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If you repeat the process, again it will group all four of the aces together. So the key is you want to cut down exactly half the cards (or if you want to get more refined, half the packets) down in the deck. This means that if you want to cull eight cards, you need to cut down to a point where four are in the top packet and four are in the bottom packet. If you wanted to cull ten, you would cut down five and so on. The third aspect, is an idea we have already touched on in the previous...

Credits

I have attempted to give some credit where it is due, as I am aware it is due. I hesitate to mention the sources where I have learned some of the material when I know it is not the original source. For example, basic overhand shuffling controls, the jog, break and packet pick-up were techniques I learned from independent sources and I am not aware of the origin of these techniques. Many of the other techniques, while I discovered them independently, or worked out my techniques independently do...

Riffle Stacking

I am going to work through general riffle stacking and culling quite quickly, not because there is a lack of material to be discussed, but because I personally neither use it nor endorse it. For those who are interested, Ed Marlo published The Riffle Shuffle Systems as well as I believe a work called The Riffle Shuffle Finale and further comments on the subject in the Marlo Magazines, these may prove to have interesting insights, however, not having read them I can only guess as to their...

Advantages Disadvantages and Applications of Overhand Stacking

There are reasons to use each shuffling method, though typically each method could be used exclusively. When it comes to overhand shuffling, stacking, particularly using the undercut method, is both easy and effective. Due to the simplicity of the process combined with relative invisibility, stacking is the forte of the overhand shuffle. The pick-up culling method is in my view an excellent one, but none of the peeking methods are satisfactory and the need for marked cards to make it effective...

Info

The thumb will then begin riffling off cards as the forefinger continues to supply that bit of pressure. This process allows you to glimpse the faces of the cards as they flash past. (See figure 264.) Again, although this may seem like a very obvious method of peeking and determining a cut location, you will notice that because it is so natural and because it is employed by the vast majority of casual card players, it will fly provided it is performed in a casual manner. Of course in more...

Use of Stealing Palming and Shifts in Stacking

Each of the subjects mentioned in this section are very complex and deserve description and subtleties of their own, I will leave those for another book though. What I will describe are merely the faintest outlines of the concept and their impact on cheating, or rather this particular aspect of cheating. The importance is perhaps introduced by the use of multiple shifts in magic and gambling effects. Often one might insert the four aces, as an example, in four different parts of the deck and...

Basic Riffle Culling and Stacking

When I first moved from overhand shuffling to riffle shuffling, the reason was culling. I found I could easily get away with culling cards using a riffle shuffle but not do so well using an overhand shuffle and since I generally didn't know the location of cards when I was handed a deck the overhand shuffling didn't do me much good. As I progressed, I developed for myself a benchmark in culling, which determines the three categories and later the level of the Count's Riffle Shuffle System as...

Advanced Overhand Stacking

In reality, I moved from the techniques described, to riffle stacking, but it seems logical while giving an explanation of overhand stacking methods to cover them all at once and so, since it is my book, that is what I will do. The initial concern of the previous method, is the need to begin with the cards on the top or bottom of the deck. Understandably this is not exactly a realistic expectation and thus it is important to be able to move cards from lower down in the deck and stack them...

The Counts Riffle Shuffle System

What will follow is not a technique, but a system. I stated in the previous section that while Marlo appears to have written a section on stacking each individual hand, I don't see the need, except perhaps in so far as game theory is concerned and I will not address that here. The system can be applied in a vast array of ways, but for me, the most direct example comes in some complex shuffles such as four of a kind culled and stacked in two shuffles. The benchmarks progress as I work through...

The Riffle Culling Concept

Stacking with a riffle shuffle is, at least in concept a simple one, culling is even more so. You will cut to the card you desire. For the sake of example let us assume that you wish to cull the aces and the ace of clubs is the twenty-second card down in the deck. You would then cut down twenty-one cards so that the ace is on the top of the one packet. Then, as the cards are riffled together you will hold back that ace and ensure it ends up on the top of the deck. When you cut to the next ace...

Advanced Riffle Stacking and Culling

At this point I have difficulty deciding how much to consider under advanced riffle stacking and how much to save for the count's riffle stacking system, since there are many points of overlap. The reality is I have rarely and only to a limited degree used what I consider to be advanced riffle stacking due to what I consider to be, a vast superiority in the count's riffle stacking system. I suppose it matters little whether I introduce the ideas now or later, but I will cover them as I have...

Overhand Peeking Culling

When I started working with these ideas the primary drawback of the previous stacking methods was the need to have the cards in a known location at in the deck, generally the top or bottom. Consequently, it becomes desirable and arguably necessary to determine a method of peeking while performing an overhand shuffle. Originally, I felt the only really effective method would be to glance at the bottom card of the deck as it was held in the right hand overhand shuffling grip. The problem with...

Intermediate Riffle Stacking and Culling

Sadly, if we consider that the benchmarks for basic riffle stacking and culling four aces added up to a total of ten shuffles, we see an immense failure on the part of the method, ten shuffles is after all, unacceptable. It seems obvious then that I would have wished to use bottom dealing and eliminate four of those shuffles. With intermediate culling and stacking, we see the number drop from ten, to a total of only six, the equivalent of those needed to make use of the bottom deal and yet...

Basic Overhand Stacking

Obviously, since my study of cards began, as I mentioned, with attempts at overhand deck stacking, so to will my examination of stacking. The general weakness one which I will address later , of overhand stacking, is the in ability to determine which cards are at one's disposal. Though to some both in the field of gambling, but most particularly magicians who rarely perform what I would consider to be real gambling simulations , it is not a concern, it always seemed to me ridiculous that most...