The Patter

"Ladies and Gentlemen; I must tell you about the time Santa Claus was fooled, not by getting into the wrong chimney, but by something in his sleigh that he hadn't known was built by a helper back at his ITorth Pole workshop."

1 'Twas the night before Christmas

When, all through the house, Hot a creature was stirring -Hot even a mouse.

2 The stillness was broken

By an overhead sound, As dovm the chimney St. Nicholas Came with a bound.

3 A bundle of toys

He had packed in his sack, And he looked like a peddler With that load on his back.

4 He spoke not a word}

Nor made any noise, As he opened his bag

To distribute the toys.

5 A drum, doll and sleds

The usual things That kiddies all ask for, And Santa Claus brings.

6 While filling the stockings

A magic trick caught his eye, So he stopped in his work 3hst to give it a try.

7 A glass, a bottle

And hollow tubes as you see; To hide both the objects From you — and from me.

8 The glass and the bottle

Are hidden from sight, With the glass on the left, The bottle on the right.

9 More rapid than reindeer,

So lively and quick, Came a transposition

That fooled old St. Nick -

10 For, on lifting the covers As you will see, The glass and the bottle

Aren't where they should be.

11 He hides them again,

And can't believe his eyes; For, when the covers are lifted It's another surprise.'

To make sure of his ground; But,believe it or not, The bottle isn't found.

13 Again he lifts the covers

And nearly loses his mind, For, strange as it may seem to you, No glass can he find.

14 Itoor Santa's all bewildered;

The solution must be wons How to set things right again Before the night is done?

15 Then, with a wink of hie eye

And a nod of his head, He suddenly knew that

Magic words should be said.

16 So he cried, "Merry Christmas.'"

From his lips the words burst. And both of the objects

Were where they were first.

Presentation notes and keyed informationsVerses #3 and #5 are optional. The set-up has the glass on the magician's left and the bottle on his right.

Verse #7 - Show the tubes, cover bottle with one, steal the extra bottle, and then cover the glass with this tube.

Verse #8 - lift up the tubes, one at a time, showing the glass and bottle changed. Verse #10 - Lift both tubes together. Verse #11 - Cover and then lift both at once. Verse #12 - Lift one tube at a time, the right tube first, each time lifting up the bottle also. Replace.

Verse #13 - Lift right tube and bottle to show nothing. Lift left tube showing bottle. No glass. Replace.

Verse #16 - Show bottle and glass as at start Page 709

Skeptical Marion Jensen, receptionist in the Star Journal editorial offices, yesterday met James J. DeVoll, magician, who lives at Normandy hotel. Marion doubted DeVoll could make her float in the air as he claimed, so he proceeded with his trick. Here, he is showing Marion the magic rug on which she will lie.

Skeptical Marion Jensen, receptionist in the Star Journal editorial offices, yesterday met James J. DeVoll, magician, who lives at Normandy hotel. Marion doubted DeVoll could make her float in the air as he claimed, so he proceeded with his trick. Here, he is showing Marion the magic rug on which she will lie.

The pictures 011 this page are from a Minneapolis paper.

_ Mr. DeVoll now is marketing his gadget for less than $50.

We take pride in a magical scoop when we say that it will be the next big carnival, side-show, and what-have-you expose item, taking the place of the now well worn headless lady illusion. --- That Winchell notice of a hushed up Boston society matron's suicide attempt in a magician's dressing room is not concerned with any one with whom we are concerned. —- Dante's chief lady assistant, Miss Msi-TO-(Loretta) Miller, told a Liberty reporter how useful magic could be to a woman in ordinary life. "When you wash dishes," to quote, "you seldom break anything if you wear your fingernails the way magicians wear theirs, very long and filed down at the sides, with the third and fourth fingers of the right hand and the index finger of the left hand trained to extra dexterity. Magic also teaches you the wisdom of shoe comfort. Your most marvelous tricks are apt to go wrong if your feet hurt." Wy God! Is that why my tricks don't get the applause I think is their due?

If you bought a trick over a dealer's counter and got a Jinx subscription I'm glad. One salesman for my money sells an effect after demonstration and takes in the dollar. Then he gives the customer a copy of this sheet In which the stunt just chown appeared, and says, "You'll get seven more." --- Jay Marshall and his father-in-law Al Baker are separate professional entertainers. Neither one gives "material" to the other. Neither is responsible in any way for the actions of the other. And neither wants the incident (#118,119) mentioned again. So each of you are now on your own.

DeVoll starts bis incantation, telling Marion to stiffen her body so she will float lightly in the air. In addition to this trick, DeVoll also perfected the "light-bulb-in-the-hand" trick, selling the secret of it to other world-famous magicians like Blackstone.

After manipulating Marion into the proper position, DeVoll slowly takes his hands away—and believe it or not, Marion stays up. In addition, DeVoll also does character analysis and palm reading. Oh, yea—he brought Marion down again.

To prove there's nothing up his sleeves, DeVoll shows Marion the rug, above. The trick, his own invention, is called "The challenger—one-man safety lévitation."

Here DeVoll starts to rap the magic rug around Marion. Mystifying part of the trick is that it is performed out in the open, without ropes or pullies.

Martin Gardner's "After The Dessert" is worth its cheap price, ethers have reviewed the mss. of tricks which can be done at any time, any place, and with objects at hand around the table, but we held off until we tried a few of them on "tough" occasions.The answer is this notice. ---

Paste in your notebook that article by Dell O'Dell which appeared in the December "Tope". It took a lot of practical experience to get together such a compendiilm of publicity-worth tricks. -- Blackstone will be in Newark,

N.J. on Dec. 10th for a few days. That new Hindu Rope trick with vanishing boy has been worrying us. --- Card squiggles (#115) are gradually coming in. The answer for magic mag contests must be, at least, a six month or longer period. We're glad that we set it for that time because it has come to our notice that many of the fellows are using the first five months for thought, and the final month for sending in the idea pictorlally.

DeVoll starts bis incantation, telling Marion to stiffen her body so she will float lightly in the air. In addition to this trick, DeVoll also perfected the "light-bulb-in-the-hand" trick, selling the secret of it to other world-famous magicians like Blackstone.

After manipulating Marion into the proper position, DeVoll slowly takes his hands away—and believe it or not, Marion stays up. In addition, DeVoll also does character analysis and palm reading. Oh, yea—he brought Marion down again.

Page 710

By the way, what has happened to the exposers, of late? Have they finally starved to death, we hope? --- Chester

Morris' honeymoon must wait until after Jan.1 because of his latest blood and thunder movie schedule. That's like looking across a magic dealer's counter two weeks before pay-day. —- Since black Friday when The Sphinx spurned our offer of purchase rumors have it that we intend to enlarge The Jinx and accept advertising. As Roget said: erroneous, false, untrue, devoid of truth, fallacious, faulty, apocryphal, unreal, ungrounded, groundless, unsubstantial, wrong, inexact, innacurate, incorrect. In short: bunk.

To prove there's nothing up his sleeves, DeVoll shows Marion the rug, above. The trick, his own invention, is called "The challenger—one-man safety lévitation."

Here DeVoll starts to rap the magic rug around Marion. Mystifying part of the trick is that it is performed out in the open, without ropes or pullies.

European magic news and accounts are scarce. The Wov. 16th issue of "The World's Fair" just arrived with the first major curtailment of the magic page. "We regret the brevity of these Notes this week," says the editor, "which is due to delay in postal deliveries and other factors beyond our control." We still howl to high heaven when we think of the picture of that big department store in London, its entire front blown out, but with a sign reading,

"If you think this is bad you should see our Berlin branch."1

| THE MYSTERY OF THE SUITS |

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