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There's an object lesson in the reading of the news clipping (Boston American, Sept. 13, 1940) reproduced at the bottom of this page. Elwin ("Le Conjuror") T. Shaw's technique for making blase reporters and columnists interested might well be followed by many others. — The Walter Gibson just incarcerated in the N.Y.C. bastile for advertising a Seventh Day Adventist meeting by motoring through the city's streets with a picture of Hitler, IS NOT magic's Walter Brown Gibson, alias Maxwell Grant, confidant biographer of The Shadow. Just thought we'd put it down to squelch those ever-present "boys" who haven't enough engagements to keep them from being"busybodies." — The J.Karson "Ifypno Tricks" publication is worth its rather stiff price to those who really wish to include a series of hypnotic tests in their program. Some are not new, but for the most part the various stunts and secrets are of value by being true professional procedures. Everyone knows the old way, "Now you are sleepy, etc.," but the new way is the magician's way whereupon a 15 minute routine can be injected into a program with no waste of valuable time.

Dante's show closed in N.Y.C. on Oct. 20th, for a few weeks to make plans. The Nora Bayes theatre is a tentative reopening spot, but, for the moment, nothing is definite. We feel that the Dante show affected us, and others as well, because of a simple reason that only a few of the present day magicians realize. There never was any recapitulation of what had been done preparatory to the culmination of a trick. The perfoimer went through his moves and took it for granted that his audience was watching and remembered what had been done and shown. The climax then took place without a disastrous delay during which the magician talked over what he had done and where everything was supposed to be. There are a lot of people who get bored at this wait, and many who are a bit "miffed" at the supposition that they haven't seen what was done. It's'well worth the time to check up on your own act. The time saved will allow or a couple of more effects 'being added.

Does someone know of a magician advertising in the United States before Dec. 25, 1837? Robert Doidge recently added to his collection a broadside of a Monsieur P. Desage, Professor of Magic — American Museum — 5th & Chestnut Sts., Philadelphia for that date. — Fulton Oursler is also eager to learn who wrote a book novel entitled "Zig-Zag, The Magician". It was published just after the turn of the century.

Incidentally, Mr. Oursler still has several mss. he wrote when 11 years old. One was a collection of "cases" which Sherlock Holmes completed, but which "Dr. Watson" did not consider (or perhaps for which he didn't have time) as important as those he related to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Another of the writings was a story about a magician whose pieces or apparatus kept disappearing wnenever ne needed something during a performance. That last plot intrigues us no end. It seems like a sort of poetic justice.

Martin Gardner has sold a variation on the magnetic pups which was such a rage. It seems impossible for this not to "click" to the tune of excellent royalties. Not too risque the theme is "The Goose That Failed". It is very funny to let the little man with top hat and cane sneak upon the unsuspecting (?) lady who never fails (thanks to good old Alnico) to swing around with a "rolling pin" arm and knock his hat off. An extra hat is supplied in case she "bats" the first one too far. Gardner's new work, "After Dinner Magic", will be completed in time for Mnas buying. Ireland will publish.

For those who do the Linking Rings, and also for those who don't, the following two methods of presentation may be of great importance. One performer picked up the set and started his talk by saying, "You all have no doubt heard of the ancient Chinese mystery, the linking of solid metal rings. Many of you have seen small sets of these rings in the various toy shops, rings which contained slots or openings, and rings which were already linked together. Tonight I want to show you the REAL Chinese type of rings which have the faculty of passing through each other. All I was able to obtain after great difficulty are these eight single rings made of an unknown metal mined in a country of many mysteries. ■' So saying he deliberately "drop counts" them from hand to hand as usual.and GOES AHEAD.'.' The second method is more devastating. "Most people insist that the rings I use cannot be solid," says the performer. "Look'and listen." He lets the rest hang on his aim while he dangles the two solid singles together. "That clear, bell-like ring guarantees that not even a crack exists. Now look and listen again." The magician puts one of the solids on his arm and picks up a ring with a slot cut in it AT LEAST ONE INCH LONG. He swings these together and gets a "clank" "clank" sound. "It would be impossible," he repeats, "to use such a broken ring, for you would know about it immediately." So finishing, the magician tosses the ring back upon the platform and forgets it. But, of course, HE HAS ANOTHER KEY RING AMONG THE REST ' Gabbatha J.'

patronage la "velvet" fta magicians are not habitual ring-s-ders and visit the gay spots only (as a rule) when one of their number is working.

A LETTER AT HAND FROU Elwin T. Shaw, who works under the professional name "Le Conjuror," and resides in Everett, demonstrates the interest the magicboys have in the wbole fraternity... In its closing paragraph, morover, the feeling of fellowship which prevails in the magic ranks, Is indicated clearly.

YOU MEET THE NICEST PEOPLE among magicians . . . They're all boosters—for one another . . . Occasionally, an unusual flareup of temperament, or of Jealousy, disturbs the ranks of the magi and the recent mild protest by Gulli Gulli, at the Mayfair, against the alleged lifting by Dr. Giovanni of the "ring on a stick" trick was one . . . These exceptions are so infrequent as to prove the rule that the hocus-pocus boys are living examples of Equity's famous slogan: "AH for one—one for all!"

patronage la "velvet" fta magicians are not habitual ring-s-ders and visit the gay spots only (as a rule) when one of their number is working.

A LETTER AT HAND FROU Elwin T. Shaw, who works under the professional name "Le Conjuror," and resides in Everett, demonstrates the interest the magicboys have in the wbole fraternity... In its closing paragraph, morover, the feeling of fellowship which prevails in the magic ranks, Is indicated clearly.

"COUNT VON LUCKNER TELLS in his book of learning the trick while visiting India ... I saw the Count perform this trick In New York at a magic show a few years ago ... As for 'Gulli Gulli—did you know that his name is the Egyptian's patter line corresponding to what we Americas magi might call 'hocus pocus' ? —having imitators, .the enclosed advertisement clipped from a recent magic magazine shows how many Giovanni will have "

YOU MEET THE NICEST PEOPLE among magicians . . . They're all boosters—for one another . . . Occasionally, an unusual flareup of temperament, or of Jealousy, disturbs the ranks of the magi and the recent mild protest by Gulli Gulli, at the Mayfair, against the alleged lifting by Dr. Giovanni of the "ring on a stick" trick was one . . . These exceptions are so infrequent as to prove the rule that the hocus-pocus boys are living examples of Equity's famous slogan: "AH for one—one for all!"

"I READ WITH INTEREST what you wrote regarding Gulli Gulli and Dr. Giovanni," writes "Le ConJuror" . . . "Re the ring on the stick' trick that the marvellous Gulli Gulli claims the good doctor stole from him . . . Are you sure that you have not misunderstood tbe situation? (Answer: No..) . . . 'The ring on the stick' trick Is one of the oldest in magic, and is considered by most magicians to be one of the classics.

(NOTE: THE AD SHOWS A gentleman stooge being stripped of suspenders, wrist-watch, wallet and fountain-pen by another gent who advertises that he can teach aspiring "amateur pickpockets" how to do the stripping.) A contest between Gulli Gulli and Giovanni would be very Interesting, but my money would ride with Giovanni."

NIGHT CLUBS LIKE TO BOOK a first rate magician . . . Before his engagement is finished, the place will have enjoyed the patronage of every magician with the price of a dinner within traveling distance . . . Thla

"ABOUT FIVE YEARS AGO Jean Huggard wrote a book 'Closeup Magic' which held a routine for this, trick, ax.d-lt states that Dr. Giovanni used the routine to good results . . . The late Nate Leipslc was very proud because he exchanged the secret for his 'ring on the stick' trick with Ten Ichl for Ichi's famous 'thumbtle trick' . . > Tbe ring trick Is a great favorite with Hindu magicians.

AND NOW COMES THE UNUSUAL ending of "Le Conjuror'»" note . . . "With best regards," he closes, "and with thanks for the plugs you have given Gulli Gulli and Dr. Giovanni and others of our profession, I am etc," . . . Can you imagine a motiou picture leading man writing h's thanks for such boosts as may have t.fn given his rivals? ... Or a Broadway comedian? Or Joan Bennett inditing her thanks for a bit of praise about Hedy Lamarr?

ditor's eayt The Hartmans, Grace and Paul, «•J*are acclaimed by critics as being America's most perfect satirists of the dance. combining a sort of mad type of magic with their subtle burlesques of ballroom and exhibition dancing, this couple has reached the heights of accomplishment as judged by their bookings in the finest and "swankiest" of places. The trick which follows is of that semi-serious, semi-humorous type that lends itself well to presentation by those who do not present their magic in a strictly serious vein. The idea simply is to get a number of laughs without exposing any parts of the modus operandi.)

The performer asks for the loan of a watch, at the same time securing the aid of another spectator from his audience. From this assistant's pocket, when both have reached the stage, the performer produces a silk stocking.

The watch is dropped into the stocking and secured by being tied up near the ankle by a piece of ribbon. During this operation the performer accidentally (?) drops the stocking, which, of course, does not do the watch any bit

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of good. Re then asks tne assistant to return the watch to its owner, and adds, "Let him have the stocking too. You can get another, if not the other." The performer drops the bundle into a plush bag and hands all to the assistant saying, "Let him get it back by himself. You've not had a thing to do with it at all."

Upon the spectator's hesitation, or evident discomfiture, the performer introduces a roll of heavy brown wrapping paper (or a tolied up grass mat) and from it unrolls a two foot toy type of parasol which he opens and offers to the assistant. "This will protect you in case he throws anything at you." All of this concern on the performer's part, for the assistant, doesn't seem to be what that person wants, so the decision is made to make things right, magically.

The sunshade is rolled inside the paper and the bag held by the assistant given a seven gun salute, or attention of a similar decisive sort. Prom the bag is taken, not the stockinged bundle but the cover of the parasol. Then, from —J the rolled paper is withdrawn the sunshade. Instead of the cover, now missing there is found, hanging from the skeleton ribs,' pieces of the stocking and pieces of the watch.

This mystical (?) casuality creates whatever consternation the performer deems necessary and acceptable to his audience. He remarks that maybe it still can be done correctly, though, and proceeds to place the cover over the parasol and insert the whole in the paper roll again. This time a twenty-one gun salute, or its equivalent, takes place. The paper roll is let to open and the parasol is found perfectly restored with the borrowed watch hanging by a ribbon from the handle.

The watch is detached and given the assistant for its safe return to the owner. AND ON THE ASSISTANT GOING TO DO THIS, THE LAST LAUGH IS HAD WHEN THE STOCKING IS SEEN TO BE HANGING FROM HIS BACK.

Requisites and Working: 3 lady's stockings as followss- (1) with a small pocket sewn near the opening. (2) with a small and sharp hook near the top. (3) torn into three pieces and attached to alternate ribs on the skeleton sunshade.

two sunshades of the variety described, one has the cover carefully removed in one piece. A roll of heavy brown paper with a double opening at one end as for the regulation and standard "Mutilated Parasol Trick". Many of the later day presentations of this trick use a rectangular mat for this as it does not visually show as much of a bulge at the end where the absent parasol is always hidden.

One duplicate watch. This can be any cheap watch case with a few loose insides.

A number of pieces of an old watch.

A loop of ribbon with two swivel snap catches attached. The length of this must be determined on trial.

Hie stocking with the pocket is rolled as small as possible and placed in the right trousers pocket. "Hie stocking with the hook is also rolled, hook on the .¡outside, and placed in the left trousers pocket.

The pieces of stocking are tied with pieces of ribbon to alternate ribs of the mutilated sunshade and dangling pieces of a watch are tied to the vacant rib «ids left. Closed, and with the attached objects wrapped around, this sunshade is inserted into the double end of the paper or mat. The good sunshade is closed and rolled up in the mat, starting at the unprepared end, until wanted.

Hie loop of ribbon, with the swivel snap catches is kept in the left trousers pocket with the hooked stocking. The duplicate watch is kept in the right trousers pocket alongside the stocking with a pocket in its top.

A coianon, standard, changing bag is used, preferably of the smallest variety. In one compartment is put the removed sunshade covering and the handle twisted to bring the empty compartment into being. Unlike other versions this bag is used but for the one change.

A watch is borrowed and an assistant secured. On his return to the front the performer puts his right hand Into pocket and gets the watch in his palm and the balled up stocking on top of it. As he and the assistant face the audience the performer deliberately reaches in-

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to the person's side coat pocket nearest and pulls out the stocking by its top end.

He holds the open top so that the right fingers with dummy watch are inside and with his left hand he is careful to plainly show the borrowed watch for the last time, and then let It drop Into the pocket, at the same time releasing the dummy which drops to the foot.

At this point the performer changes hands at the stocking top so that the watch (borrowed) is under the left fingers. The action of then handing the stocking to the assistant with the right hand leaves the watch palmed in the left fingers, for it easily and "silkily" slips out.

The left hand drops to the trousers pocket as the performer asks the assistant to tie a knot in the stocking just above the watch ---

at about the ankle. This is a moment which must be practised a few times — but it isn't at all difficult — for it is When the performer snaps one of the catches onto the stem handle of the watch in his pocket.

Leaving this accomplishment behind,the performer takes the tied stocking back but fumbles and drops it with the resultant heartbreaking (to the owner) clatter of the watch imprls6ned.,It Is picked up, rolled up, and dropped into the change bag which is activated and then handed the spectator.

Now the sunshade is introduced by holding the mat with one hand, letting it unroll, and catching the parasol with the other. It is opened (and shown freely) and.given the assistant, according to the patter theme. This bit of by-play allows the performer's left hand to drop into the trousers pocket where it secures the watch and attached ribbon by fi+st grasping the loose catch between thumb and first two fingers and then grabbing up the rest of the ribbon and watch in the half closed fingers.

The open parasol is retrieved with the right hand. The left hand naturally goes into the top of it to release the catch and at this time snaps the catch over one of the ribs which converge to the handle ferrule which slides down in the closing of the sunshade. At this time the outer tip of the parasol is held slanting downward so that the watch ana riDDon are engulfed within the folds.

The parasol is wrapped up in the mat, and then the handle end of the mutilated frame pulled out a trifle from its hiding place. The performer shoots the gun, makes a pass, or says something trivial in Hindustani — and removes from the change bag the parasol cover. At the same time he takes the bag from the assistant and tosses it aside. From the rolled mat he next (continued on page 686)

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