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Magic should have a shrine for its relics.

True, there are a fevr with enough reverence for their life-long hobby to acquire ancient pieces of apparatus and objects personally associated with "the greats" but it is all disjointed. Only a national group, in unity, could permanently house and care for such a collection. I doubt if there is any magus who hasn't got tucked away somewhere his first "pull" or homemade gimmick that is cherished because of the memories it brings back. I know I still have those first color changing cotton hanks which didn't match in size together with the pear-shaped pull. The battered set of Brahmin Rice Bowls (bought that way because the fellow convinced us they "looked" better than "nice new shiny ones) is still intact though mother has a pretty flower growing out of one. (She also keeps potatoes throu the winter in your old escape box! Ed) And most valuable to us is the bunch of letters from Thurston, all saying, in effect, "I am filing your application for the position of assistant." But, without facetious-ness, we sincerely wish that the mementos of many now gone, and many now living in retirement, could be kept clean and moth-free in some spot where magicians would make it their business to migrate at some time and mull over the remnants and remains of an historical art.

The Parent Assembly S.A.m. has been considering what to present new members in the form of a gift - a wand pin, maybe an individual pocket piece, a scroll, etc. In the interim the members might try giving newcomers a "glad hand". On two occasions lately we've been told by sincere persons of a lack of cordiality or comradie at their first meetings. In short, no one seems to give a "hoot" about making the stranger feel at home, everybody "getting together" with their own little group. I know of one case where, after two such meetings, the person just didn't go back. Near the end of the year we happened to meet him, i'or his interest in magic* was just as great as ever, and proposed that he start buttonholing members with "Have you seen this one" tactics. Since then he has been more enthusiastic than ever and his ability recognised and respected. That might account for quite a few of the hundreds (even omitting those deceased) who have dropped out of the society. And it doesn't cost a cent to try it out. New members should, at least, be approached and invited to do something at the after-meeting show the following month.

The Sphinx has sensed a shift in tne wind for the offer has been made to print M.U.M. (official S.A.M. news) separately and include its pages only in Sphinx copies mailed to members. This is a right direction step, for there then would be no i'urtner excuse for censures and omissions of information vital to members of the organization. However, in such a case, the society should pay something less than they do now per copy per year per memDer, I'or only about 900 of these inserts wouJ.d oe necessary and the saving shouxd come from all or that talked about additional circulation of The Sphinx, no exact figures of which are available even to advertisers. We still say that the S.A.M. should have its own U.U.M. of eight pages printed monthly as was done once before, save money, and be independent of ANY commercial magazine.

Louella Parsons, nationally known Hollywood columnist, recently gave Roy Benson a nice plug for his magic and good looks on the screen. He has been niteclubbing magic here and there for the last few years with occasional picture bits. His mother was of a sister team in old vaudeville days, great personal friends of Nate and Leila Leipsig. Mich of Roy's magical charai and nonchalance came from contact with Nate. This is Just so that when the "breaks" come along the boys won't yell "Who is he? Where did he come from?" —- And here's an unprinted item. Chester Ibrris serious contemplates being married to t'iss Lillian Barker this month. I hope she doesn't houseclean and throw away that great big drawer of magic which Chester has so lovingly acquired. --- John Snyder is combining a beautiful little magic theatre with a manufacturing shop to produce tricks galore. It won't be long now before the I.B.M. convention goes to his home town to honor the most sincere and hard working president the organization could have.

Last week we mentioned a"false finger-tip" expose in Detective Fiction Weekly for Nov. 2. with an obvious mention of Holden's shop, of which Max knew nothing. Ken Crossen, editor and writer (he did the Green Lama stories) and magical enthusiast requested the "cutting" of the scene but something slipped up somewhere. Clayton (Merlini-Don Diavolo) Rawson talked to Frank Gruber, who wrote the expose, and found this out. The sequence is changed for book publication this winter and "Sam", the character, merely tries to do the trick and burns the handkerchief. Mr. Gruber was only too willing to cooperate when approached with reasons.

One of the first "Playing Card Squiggles" to arrive is that printed below. "Baby Needs Some New Shoes" is the proper title for the sketch made upon a Deuce of Diamonds. The con-

ditions of the contest were printed in Jinx No. 115. This contributor had the idea along with a number of others and then made his wife's life miserable until she did the art work. But the simplest rough sketch together with an outline of the thought would stand just as much a chance in the judges' final decision.

If we had any "booby" prizes for lack of tact we'd give the largest and most unweildy to the man who moved the S.A.M. National Council meeting by requesting that the words "a leader" be stricken from a resolution lamenting the death of Caryl Fleming.

The funniest newsclip in a long while came from Elizabeth, N.J. The heading read "Wife's Hat Stolen While Magician Acts." The story, which got an AP crosscountry wire, said, "Michael M. Martynick of Jersey City, who advertised himself as "Martynick the Great," pres-tidigator and teacher of magic, complained to police to-day that someone stole his wife's hat while he was performing feats of legerdemain in a tavern. Patrolman John J. Keenan said the magician told him he discovered the loss when he removed his blindfold after displaying his mind reading prowess

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