The Infallible Foolable Kings

The two black Kings successfully find two selected cards. This comes as a big surprise to all due to an initial glaring error. 1. Remove the two black Kings and leave them face-up on the table, saying, The black Kings are collectors they collect playing cards. 2. Have a spectator (A) select a card, then control it to the top. Have a second spectator (B) select a card, then control it to the top above the first selection. Finally add an extra card to the top (this can be done as you control the...

Twisting The Connected Kings

A Twisting the Aces sequence with Kings, which culminates in a strange sequence in which the Kings appear to be connected with their color mates. SET-UP Remove the four Kings and arrange them as follows, reading from back to face KH-KS-KC-KD 1. Show the four Kings one by one using the following end-over-end handling of Steve Hamilton's Twisting the Aces set-up, in his 2000 lecture notes A.K.A. which can also be found in Peter Duffie's Virtual Miracles (2000) a) With the packet held face-down in...

Fate Chance And Science

Fate, chance and science combine to make two spectators choose the same card. There is no set-up, just a deck of cards. This effect exploits two mathematical principles The Principle of Nine, and an elimination principle based on binary numbers, discovered by Karl Fulves, and published in Pallbearer's Review, p. 374, as Oracle. 1. Tell a spectator that you want him to arrive at a card by a combination of Fate and Chance. Ask a spectator to shuffle a deck of cards, then cut it roughly in half....

Coprime Number Principle

Take two numbers M and N that are co-primes that is, they have no factors in common. If we have a packet of M cards, transfer N cards from the top to the bottom each time, then turn over the top card, then we will turn over a new card each time, and the original top card will only be turned over after the M-th transfer. For example, if we have a nine card packet and we transfer four cards each time, the Sands Principle will work, even though neither nine nor four is prime. But they are co-prime...

The 30 Card Unicycle Stack

The other interesting order that Iain found for a one-shuffle recycle was a 30 card stack. For this you need five of each value, as the stack is made up of chains of five. Using the values one through six, you can create the following example As in the sixteen-card version, the stack recycles after one Out Faro, or Out Reverse Faro. Dealing of piles would be too laborious. Devising applications for these stacks is no easy task due to the irregular arrangement of the cards. Also, even though...

Well Look At That

A spectator chooses a card which remains in the middle of the deck. A second spectator now chooses an invisible card. The invisible card becomes visible and proves to be the first spectator's selection Noticing that it's the Ten of Spades, you say, You know, if you added four specific cards to that you'd have a great poker hand. At that, you respread the deck revealing the Ace, King, Queen and Jack of Spades Prior to starting this trick secretly reverse the Ace, King, Queen and Jack of Spades...

Murder Mystery

Self Correcting

RSC is used to solved a murder mystery. This routine evolved out of Time and Again from Robin's Card Modes (1983). 1. Talk about the current popularity of mystery parties, where a murder is enacted and the guests try to solve the mystery. Tell them that with your help and a deck of cards we will try and solve just such a murder mystery. Ask who will be willing to select the murderer (M), who will be willing to identify the victim (V), and who will note the time (T) when the crime takes place....

Jumping Jack Flash

A chosen card jumps from an estimated position in one pile to that same position in another pile. 1. Spread the deck face-down from hand-to-hand and have a spectator touch a card. Use the Spread Double Lift to turn the top two cards faceup as one, as you say, Did you realize that you've chosen the famous Jumping Card better known as Jumping Jack Flash Turn the double face-down again in similar fashion and immediately your left thumb openly outjogs the top card (Fig.1). Replace the right hand...

Last Card Standing Predictor

Last Card Standing is the easiest, unprepared handling. It could be beefed up in several ways. First, the cards could be prearranged from Ace on top to King on the bottom. Finally the King is transferred to the top. You can false-shuffle, but it has to be a full-packet false shuffle, where no cards are rearranged. This time the spectator can cut the cards and put them in his pocket without looking at them. You pick up the packet and shuffle to destroy the stack, but make sure that the original...

Rsc Multiple Shift

Here, RSC is used as an almost self-working substitute for a Multiple Shift. a) You will have three cards selected. Spread the deck until a spectator stops you. At that point, outjog the card, pick up the outjogged card under the right hand cards, and raise your hand so that the spectator can note the card (Fig.1). b) Leave the card outjogged, as you drop your hand back down and continue spreading for another selection. When another card is picked, again outjog it, then pick it up, as before,...

Kosky Switch

Gerald Kosky created a devilish, and still underused, method of switching one card for another, the card seemingly held securely, sandwiched between two face-up cards. According to Roberto Giobbi's Card College, the switch was originally published about 1940 by Joe Berg as Kosky's Invisible Card Exchange. To get a feeling for the switch at its most bare-bones use, take out the two black Kings, lay them face-up on the table, then place any card face-down between them. Get a break under the top...

Card Conspiracy

5 Self Correcting Sandwich & variants p. 27 37 38 Iain Girdwood's Unicycle Stack + The Accidental Diary p. 68 Chapter 18 - Prime Number 82 p. 83 Chapter 20 - Karl Fulves' Riffle Shuffle Control p. 85 92 93 p. 115 126 Appendix Sleights referred to in the text from Vol. 1 p. 154 161 Card Conspiracy was originally written as a single volume with an unusual organization. Each chapter was organized around a central move (or a concept, principle, or subtlety), with the chapters arranged in...

Principle Of Nine

The Principle of Nine is probably as old as mathematics itself. Take any number, say, 127. Add the digits of the number together 1 + 2 + 7 10. Finally subtract the result from the original number 127 - 10 117. The final answer is always a multiple of nine. The name of the person who made the leap to playing cards appears to be lost, though Royal V. Heath has been mentioned. Certainly, Stewart James and Bob Hummer were pioneers in the field, both working along similar lines, often combining...

Notes Corrections

On page 56 you discuss the history of the Double Deal Turn-Over. An early reference that warrants mention is Irv Weiner's Double Lift with One Card from the April 1960 Linking Ring Parade. On page 73 in Future Choice you list George Sands' One to Eight from Bill Simon's 1964 Mathematical Magic as the starting point for the forcing procedure. However, the roots go back further specifically, I would cite Bob Hummer's Poker Chip Baffle (a k a Poker Chip Mystery), marketed circa 1941. I very much...

Interlocked Principle Ip

A general purpose method for vanishing a card. According to Bruce Cervon (Card Secrets of Bruce Cervon, 1976), Dai Vernon showed him this move in 1965, but said he'd been using it for over forty years. It was first described by Vernon in Ultimate Card Secrets. Cervon includes several descriptions of how to set-up and use the move, including a clever handling of his own. Genii's recent special Mike Skinner tribute issue (Nov. 2000) included Skinner's brilliant use of a Larry Jennings technique...

The 16 Card Unicycle Stack

Set a packet of sixteen cards in the following order. Obviously any four like values can be exchanged for any other four like values. Because we are using only 16 cards, there are several shuffle options, all Faro-based. Note that in all of these stacks, the top and bottom cards remain in place after every shuffle mix. a) Give the cards an Out Faro. The order remains intact. b) Give the cards a Reverse Faro. Again the order remains intact. c) Deal the cards into two piles then put the second...

Iain Girdwoods Unicycle Stack

Iain based the following ideas on Alex Elmsley's The Restacking Pack which first appeared in the Pentagram, then subsequently in The Collected Works of Alex Elmsley, Vol.2 (written by Stephen Minch, L & L, 1994). The Unicycle Stack recycles in one shuffle. It should be noted that Roy Walton has also devised a one-shuffle recycling stack which he sent to Richard Kaufman for possible inclusion in an annotated version of The Cardiste. The following use smaller stacks, and, according to Roy, are...

Four Wrongs Make A Right

Four incorrect cards come together to find a chosen card. 1. Have a card selected and controlled to the top. 2. Hold the deck face-down and spread through asking the spectator to touch any four cards. When he touches a card you flip it face-up, then outjog it. Ask if he found his card he'll say no. 3. Riffle down the deck with your left thumb and break between the four cards (two above and two below). Do RSC Multiple Shift (vertical method) as you start to tilt your hand so the faces are...

Spread Double Lift

Card Double Lift

A very easy and convincing Double Lift, almost infallible even in clumsy hands, which is done under cover of a spread deck. As straightforward as this is, we have been unable to find it in print. Stephen Minch kindly informed us of a different technique developed by Roberto Giobbi in 1994 and is included in Card College, Vol.5. It was discovered that Frank Zaks had derived an almost identical handling which appears on Daryl's Encyclopedia of Card Sleights, Volume 5 video. a) This Double Lift...

Turning Tricks

You dribble the cards face-up from hand to hand and a spectator calls stop. The cards at the face of each half are noted, then both halves are placed face-to-face. When you respread the cards both cards have vanished The first selection now appears face-up in the middle of the deck. Handing the deck to the spectator, she now spells the name of the first selection and the second selection appears face-up on the final letter This is a variation of Alex Elmsley's Infinity Round Trip that appeared...

Data Collectors

After a card is chosen, the Aces locate three cards one with the value of the chosen card, one with the suit, and finally the chosen card itself. This, and the two tricks that follow, are variations on the Walton Collectors theme. Hold the deck face-up and glimpse the rear card let's say that it's the Jack of Clubs. Cull any Club to the back, followed by any Jack. Make it a red Jack for contrast, though this isn't essential. So the deck reads from top down Red Jack-Club-Jack of Clubs....

Selfcorrecting Sandwich

When the wrong card appears between the two black Jacks, the magician reveals the deck's self-correcting feature. 1. Spread the deck face-up and outjog the two black Jacks. Flip the deck face-down and catch a break under the top card, then pull out the Jacks and turn them face-up on top of the deck. Lift off the top three cards, as two, in a Biddle grip. Count the top Jack onto the deck then place the remaining double on top, then place the three cards square on the table. 2. Have a card...

Prime Number Principle

This essay evolved from reading the chapter on George Sands' Prime Number Principle in Arthur F. MacTier's new book Card Concepts (Lewis Davenport, 2000). For those who don't know, here's Sands' effect in brief begin with a prime number of cards P 3, 5, 7, 11, or 13, Note the top card. Pick any number N less than the number of cards in the packet. Transfer N cards from top to bottom, then turn over the top card. Do this P-1 times in total. The card noted will be the only card remaining...

Domino Effect

Two spectators create a chain of dominoes, using pairs of cards to represent dominoes. Despite almost total freedom in choosing the dominoes, they find that the magician has predicted the beginning and end of the chain in advance. Remove two pairs of cards that match in both value and color for example, the red Sevens and black Queens. Take one of each and put them into an envelope to be used as a prediction. Then remove eleven more pairs of cards. These only need to match in value, not color....

Riffle Shuffle Control

Karl Fulves' Riffle Shuffle Control RSC is a general purpose method of getting either one or two chosen cards to a known position in the pack. It evolved slowly out of more special purpose moves and was first explained in Epilogue November, 1972 , and later in Riffle Shuffle Control Karl Fulves, 1979 . For some reason, it's never become as widely known as it deserves. In our joint Linking Ring Parade July, 2000 , we described RSC, together with a variety of tricks using it. Jon Racherbaumer...