Peter Duffie

Two cards are freely chosen from a packet. A spectator now finds the matching mates. This is essentially Roy Walton's Double Discovery (The Complete Walton, Vol.1, 1981). While playing with Crossfire, I realized that the same concept could also be used for a one-spectator version of Roy's trick. The cross-deal is Arthur Setterington's. 1. This time you remove 6 pairs of cards (rather than 5) and arrange them in a rotational stack A-B-C-D-E-F-A-B-C-D-E-F. 2. Give the packet to a spectator and...

Duffie Robertson

A card trick in which Bob Hummer's Cut-and-Turnover (CATO) principle is used to demonstrate California's electricity problems. 1. Has everyone heard about the problems California is having with electricity Things are getting so bad, people have a better chance winning in Las Vegas than keeping their electricity on in California. I'll give you an example. Each card will represent a California household. At any given time, one house might have the electricity on, one their electricity off, on and...

By Peter Duffie

You ask a spectator name to name king - he might say Diamonds. You cut the KD to the top of the deck and remove the two black Aces. You explain that the King will represent Elvis - the King of Rock 'n Roll, and the two Aces are his bodyguards. You place Elvis between his bodyguards then pop the sandwich into the card box, which represents the auditorium. You say, It has only recently come to light that Elvis had a secret way of leaving the auditorium without the fans seeing him. When the...

Mini Mental Revisited

The deck is shuffled by the audience and a spectator removes any eight cards. Two spectators each think of one of the cards. You ask each one question - they answer yes or no. You immediately know where each spectator's card is. This is a simplification of Peter Alexis' Mini-Mental (Pallbearers Review, page 380). Alexis says, with regard to the procedure, The system may look complicated. It isn't. Well, it may not be highly complicated, but it could be made a lot simpler. There are also two...

Trick with the Si Stebbins Pack From Card Tricks That Work 1934

The performer has a card freely selected. He now lays two cards on the table. One of these cards denotes the suit and the other the value of the selected card. An arranged pack set up in the Si Stebbins order, every card being three spots higher than the preceding card. Plus the four suits rotating in an known order. False shuffle, have a card selected, cut the pack at the selected card. Now deal off cards until you come to the twelfth card, this card will denote the suit and the thirteenth...