To Perform

Patter as previously described and remove the eleven file cards at the appropriate time. Take off the clip and show the cards one-at-a-time to the audience, without altering their order. Since you have not referred to the exact number of villains or cards, the audience will not question your later reference to ten cards during the selection process. Hold the packet of cards in your left hand, perpendicular to the floor. This facilitates holding the packet either face up or face down as you count down to the spectator's card. Here's how to arrive at either of the two force names:

Ask the spectator to please call out any number over "one" but under "ten." Naturally, this eliminates either "one" or "ten" from being selected. I prefer this procedure over asking the spectator to choose a number between one and ten. Too often I've had the spectator say "one" or "ten" and I then have to reiterate that I specified "between" one and ten. If the spectator calls out any number from "one" through "five," allow the vertically held packet of cards to fall face down on your left hand.

Here's how to arrive at either of the two force names which are at this point, in the third and fifth positions from the top of the face down packet. If the number selected is "two," deal two cards face down on the table, counting aloud, "one—two." Without skipping a beat push off to the right the card now on top of the packet (the original third card in the packet) and ask the spectator to please take the card he has randomly determined. If the number called is "three," than count three cards face down on the table and ask the spectator to pick up the third card dealt. Either way, the spectator has received the third card from the top of the packet. The same procedure is followed for "four" and "five." If four, deal four cards down and push off the fifth card, handing it to the spectator. If "five" is called, deal five cards face down on the table and have the spectator pick up the fifth card.

For the numbers, "six" through "nine," allow the packet of vertically held cards to drop on the left hand and deal the cards face up using the previously described procedure to arrive at either of the two force names. In other words, with the packet face up, the force names are seventh and ninth from the face of the packet. If "six"

is called, deal six cards face down on the table and hand the "seventh" card to the spectator. If "seven" is called, deal seven cards face up on the table and have the spectator pick up the seventh or face card of the cards dealt. If "eight" is called, deal eight cards face up on the table and hand the spectator the next card as his selection. If "nine" is called, deal nine cards face up on the table and have the spectator pick up the ninth card dealt. So no matter which number the spectator selects, you very fairly(?) force one of the two predicted villains.

At this point, after informing the audience about Gould's high tech crime fighting devices such as the two-way wrist radio, display the Pencorder and proceed to reveal the proper prediction by simply switching the channel button from "A" to "B" depending on which of the two villains the spectator has selected, and pressing the "play" button.

Close-up or stand-up (with a sound system) this novel prediction is entertainment all the way. I have always found that the use of unusual, everyday objects greatly enhances the entertainment value of an effect. The "$99.95 Miracle" is no exception.

Friendly Persuasion

Friendly Persuasion

To do this successfully you need to build a clear path of action by using tools if necessary. These tools would be facts, evidence and stories which you know they can relate to. Plus you always want to have their best interests at heart, in other words, you know what is good for them

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