The Flasher

What makes this so special? Plenty. To begin with, the Flash Cards that are used are right out of the box. That's right, legitimate flash cards used to teach the kiddies how to add. But just wait till you see the miraculous metal blockbuster we've created using these ordinary teaching aids. Here's what the audience sees.

The performer displays the flash cards and explains that there are 50 cards with simple addition problems printed on both sides. A total of 100 different problems just waiting to be solved. The first of three spectators is randomly selected. The make-up of the cards is explained. The spectator is handed a separate 4" x 6" card with a numbered list of many different objects printed on it. He confirms that the objects are totally different from one another. The spectator is now asked to thoroughly mix the cards in any fashion and to select one card while the performer's back is turned. The spectator is then told to add together the top numbers on either side of his selected flash card or the bottom two numbers. Using this secret number, the spectator is then told to concentrate on the item next to his randomly selected number on the list of objects. All this occurs while the performer's back is turned.

The pack of flash cards is then handed to a second spectator for mixing. The performer casually dribbles the shuffled cards from hand to hand until the spectator calls "stop." Turning his head away, the performer asks the spectator to memorize the addition problem on the back of the card he freely selected (no force).The cards are then handed to a third spectator for another mixing. The third spectator is handed a sealed envelope to place in his pocket. He is then told to remove any card from anywhere in the shuffled pack and to sit on it. The flash cards are then discarded.

Here comes the mind shattering climax. The first spectator is told to visualize his freely selected object. The performer quickly draws something on a pad. The spectator is asked to reveal for the first time, the object he is thinking of. The performer shows what he has drawn and it's precisely the object the spectator was thinking of. Applause. Moving to the second spectator, the performer hands him a pad and a pen. Standing back to back, the performer asks the spectator write the problem and its solution that he's been thinking of, on the pad. The performer does likewise. When the two written problems are compared, they are identical. Applause. Finally, the third spectator is asked to remove the card he is sitting on and to add together the totals of both problems on either side of his freely selected card. This grand total is then revealed for the first time. The performer asks the spectator to open the sealed envelope he has in his pocket and to remove the contents. On a large sheet of paper is the exact total just called out by the third spectator. Applause! Applause! Applause!

This is hot! The flash cards are just that, ordinary flash cards fresh off the shelf. Nothing is added or taken away. There is no sleight of hand required. The "Flasher" is so easy to do and everything is totally examinable. However, the secret will boggle your mind. Tired of doing mere card tricks. The "Flasher" is just what you've been wishing for. Powerful! Simple! Entertaining! And totally inexplicable. The "Flasher" requires nothing more than the ordinary pack of flash cards and a secret that will bring a smile to your face and presentation that'll generate loud applause from your audience. No counting, spelling, complicated procedures, or sleight of hand. It's so easy you can devote all of your efforts to giving it the presentation it so richly deserves. Several variations included.

"The Flasher" comes with detailed instructions, flash cards and printed list. Everything is completely examinable. There are no hidden gimmicks or electronics. Only $30.00 plus $7.50 for 3-day UPS in the U.S. Make check or money order payable to Larry Becker - P.O. Box 6023, Carefree, AZ 85377. Overseas, please add $5.00 airmail delivery. Visa/Mastercard accepted. Include name, number & expiration date. Phone or fax: (480) 488-0980.

The Flasher

EFFECT:

The performer displays a box containing addition "Flash Cards" which are used to teach children how to add. Removing the cards, the performer explains that there are 50 cards with simple addition problems printed on both sides. A total of 100 different problems in addition just waiting to be solved. The first of three spectators is randomly selected. The spectator is handed a card containing a numbered list of 20 different objects printed on it. The spectator is asked to confirm that the items printed on the card are all different from one another. The spectator is now asked to thoroughly mix the cards in any fashion that he wishes and to then freely select one card while the performer's back is turned. The spectator is then requested to add together either the top two numbers on both sides of the card he selected...or the bottom two numbers.

Using this secret number, the spectator is then told to concentrate on the item printed next to his secret number. For example, say the top number on one side of the spectator's card is "6" and the top number on the reverse side of his card is "5." Adding 6+5, the spectator remembers the total "11" as his secret number. Now, while the performer's back is turned the spectator is requested to locate the item next to the number "11" on the printed list which is "LIFESAVER"... and to memorize same. The spectator then replaces his selected card anywhere in the deck of Flash Cards.

The cards are then handed to a second spectator for a second mixing. Retrieving the cards, the performer casually allows the shuffled cards to "dribble" downward from his right hand to the upturned palm of his left hand. The spectator is asked to call "stop" at any time as the cards are gradually released one or two at a time from the bottom of the deck by the fingers of the right hand . When the spectator calls "stop", the performer turns his head away and sliding the top card of the deck in his left hand to the right, the card stopped upon is grasped between the performer's extended right first and second fingers (the remaining right fingers hold the remainder of the deck) which lift the card up, allowing the spectator to see the addition problem on the down side of the card. The spectator is instructed to memorize the addition problem facing him. The card is returned to the top of the deck in the left hand and the remainder of the deck is dropped on top, burying it. Remember, the performer's head is turned away throughout the selection process. The deck of Flash Card is then handed to a third spectator for yet another mixing. The third spectator is handed a sealed envelope which he is instructed to place in his jacket pocket. Then, while the performer's back is turned, the spectator is asked to remove ANY card from the deck and to sit on it. The flash cards are then returned to the box and placed aside.

(Note: forgive the extreme detail of the description above. It was done intentionally to save time in explaining the handling of the effect later on. Naturally, it takes far longer to describe than to perform it).

Now, for the mind shattering climax. The first spectator is told to visualize his randomly selected object. The performer quickly draws something on a pad. The spectator is asked for the first time to reveal the object he is thinking of. For example, the spectator replies, a "LIFESAVER." The performer shows what he has drawn and it is a drawing of a "LIFESAVER."

Moving to the second spectator, the performer hands him a pad and pen. Standing back-to-back with the spectator, the performer, who asks the spectator to boldly write the addition problem he's thinking of, including the answer, on his pad. The performer does likewise. When the two problems are compared they are IDENTICAL to one another.

Finally, the third spectator is asked to remove the card he is sitting on and to add together the sum total of BOTH problems shown on either side of his freely selected flash card. The spectator is asked to call out the grand total of both problems, for example, the spectator calls out, "20!" The performer asks the spectator to open the sealed envelope in his pocket and to remove the folded sheet of paper inside. The spectator does so. When the paper is unfolded, it is seen that boldly printed on the paper is the number "20."

The Secret:

You have been supplied with a genuine deck of addition "Flash Cards" manufactured by the Hoyle Playing Card Company. They have not been altered in any way. Two of the cards have been treated with roughing fluid, but that's it. Other than that, the cards are exactly as produced by Hoyle. Believe it or not, the actual make-up of the cards by the folks at Hoyle permits you to accomplish all the effects described. Incidentally, you do not have to use three spectators. Nor do you have to perform all three effects at one time. Use "The Flasher" anyway you wish to routine it. This is one of those lucky situations when the idiosyncrasies of a product are practically all that's necessary to perform our mental miracles. Here's the secret:

(1) If you add together the top two numbers on either side of every card, the total will always be "11."

(2) If you add together the bottom two numbers on either side of every card, the total will always be "9." For example, say the problems shown on either side of a card are 9 + 6 and 2 + 3. If you add the two top numbers (9 + 2) you get 11. If you add together the bottom two numbers (6 + 3) you get "9."

(3) If you add together the totals of the problems on either side of every card, the sum total will always be "20." For example, 9 + 6 = 15 and 2 + 3 = 5. 15 + 5 = 20.

(4) If you subtract the total of the problem on either side of a card, from "20", the remainder will always be the total of the problem showing on the opposite side of the card. For example, say you see 9+6 on one side of a card. Subtract the total of these two numbers (15) from 20 and you have the answer to the problem on the opposite side of that card, i.e., 2 + 3 = 5.

(5) The tiny "Teacher's Answers" printed in the upper left hand corner of every card "mirrors" the problem printed on the opposite side of that card.

Can you believe it? This deck is actually made up to be a mentalist's dream come true, straight from the Hoyle factory. If you had examined the cards before reading this far, believe me, you would never have noticed the above. In addition to these built-in miracle making features, we've also roughed two cards. You will find these immediately below the printed card which is headed, "Identi-sign Flash Cards. (Be sure to record them to facilitate setting up for your next performance). This pair of roughed cards is included to enable you to perform a simple double-turnover to demonstrate that the totals are different from the ones that you will force during the routine.

The accompanying list of objects should be trimmed and mounted on a piece of white posterboard. You will note that while the objects are all different from one another, two of them can be drawn in identical fashion. The object listed after number "9" is "Donut. The object after the number "11" is "Lifesaver." Both of the force items can be represented by drawing a circle inside of a circle.

To Prepare:

Place the pair of roughed cards below the printed card titled, "Identi-sign Flash Cards". Box the cards with the "Identi-sign" card face up. You'll also need an 8-1/2" x 11" prediction sheet with the number "20" boldly printed on it. Fold the prediction and seal it in an envelope. Prepare the "object list" by trimming it and gluing it to a heavy piece of white posterboard. You can protect it against wear and dirt by laminating both sides of the card with adhesive backed laminating film easily obtained at any office supply store. You'll also need two drawing pads approximately 9" x 12" and two bold point black marking pens.

To Perform:

Follow the routine as outlined under the description of the "effect." Remove the cards and explain their purpose and make-up. Hand a spectator the "Object" list and ask him to confirm that it contains twenty different objects, numbered 1 through 20. Emphasize that there are no duplicate objects. Now explain that the spectator will have to make several choices in order to select a secret number. A number that will be known only to him. Hold the deck in your left hand. Discard the "Identi-sign" card. Explain that in a moment you want the spectator to select any one of the fifty cards. Then, he is to add together either the TOP TWO NUMBERS on his selected card...or the BOTTOM TWO NUMBERS.

To demonstrate, the performer points to the top number on the top card of the deck (one of the two roughed cards). He states, "If you choose to add together the top numbers on the front and back of your card, for example the number "10," add that number to the top number on the opposite side." As he says this, the performer pushes the top card to the right using his left thumb. The roughed cards will stay together in perfect alignment, as if they are one card. Now, the performer with his right thumb on top and the first and second fingers underneath, grasp the extended right edge of the double card and smoothly turns it over, right to left. (Since the cards are roughed, it's easy to do the double push-off of the top two cards, quickly and deceptively). Pointing to the top number on the side that's now face up, the performer adds it to the number he just called out, for example, "6", producing a total other than "11", one of the two force numbers.

This same procedure is now repeated to show what happens if the spectator chooses to add together the bottom two numbers on his selected card, for example, 5 + 0, producing a total other than "9", the other of the two force numbers. The performer retrieves the numbered object card and hands the spectator the deck of flash cards to shuffle. While the performer's back is turned, the spectator shuffles the deck and removes any card. The spectator is asked to add together either the top two numbers or the bottom two numbers and to memorize the total as his secret number.

The deck is now handed to a second spectator who is asked to shuffle it. The performer returns the numbered object card to the first spectator who is told to remember the object listed next to his secret number. (Naturally the spectator can only arrive at a secret total of "11" or "9"... the object he will therefore be concentrating upon will either be "Donut" or "Lifesaver"...both of which can be represented by drawing a circle inside of a circle).

The performer now retrieves the deck of flash cards. Holding the deck in his left hand, the performer grasps the deck from above with the right hand, thumb at the rear, the forefinger resting on top of the deck, and the index and ring fingers grasping the front of the deck. The deck is lifted off the left hand approximately 4 to 6 inches. Now the right forefinger presses down lightly. The right thumb and fingers allow the cards to dribble off the right fingers onto the left palm which is 4 to 6 inches below. Simultaneously, the performer asks the spectator to call "stop" at any time.

When he does so, the performer quickly notes and remembers the addition problem showing on the top card of the packet in his left hand, for example, 4 + 6. Immediately turning his head away, the performer pushes the top card of the left hand packet to the right, using his left thumb. The top card, now jogged off the right edge of the deck, is grasped between the extended right forefinger and index finger. The side opposite the 4 + 6 is displayed to the spectator who is requested to remember the problem now facing him, for example, 7 + 3. The performer, his head still turned away, replaces the card in his right hand, back on top of the left hand packet. The balance of the cards in the right hand are deposited on top of the selected card and the entire deck is handed to a third spectator.

How does the performer ascertain the addition problem the spectator is concentrating on? Simple! The performer only has to subtract the top number of the problem he glimpsed moments before, from 11 and the remainder is the top number the spectator memorized on the opposite side of the card (11 - 4= 7). To identify the bottom number of spectator's problem, the performer subtracts the bottom number of his noted problem from 9 (9 - 6= 3) and the remainder is the bottom number of the spectator's freely selected addition problem. The performer now memorizes the spectator's problem, 7 + 3.

The performer removes a sealed envelope from his pocket (which contains a prediction of the number "20") and hands it to the third spectator who is requested to place it in his pocket for safekeeping. The performer asks the third spectator to mix the cards and to remove any card while the performer's back is turned. The spectator is then told to sit on

his freely selected card. When this is done, the performer turns, retrieves the deck and places it in his pocket.

Now for the dynamite triple climax. Approaching the first spectator, the performer, pad in hand, asks the spectator to picture the object he is concentrating upon (it will be either a Donut or a Lifesaver). The performer quickly draws a double circle (which can represent either a Donut or a Lifesaver) on the pad without letting anyone see what he has drawn. The spectator is asked to reveal for the first time the object he is thinking of, for example, "Donut". The performer shows that he has drawn a giant "Donut." (Applause!)

Approaching the second spectator, the performer hands him a drawing pad and marking pen. Asking the spectator to stand back-to-back with him, the performer, using a second pad, invites the spectator to boldly print the addition problem he is thinking of...including the total...on his pad. For example, the spectator writes 7 + 3= 10. The performer does likewise. When the two pads are shown, the audience sees that both problems are identical. (Applause!)

Finally the third spectator is asked to retrieve the card he has been sitting on. He's requested to total the problems on both sides of his freely selected card. The spectator is then told to add both totals together to create a grand total of the two problems. For example, "20."

The spectator is asked to remove the sealed envelope from his pocket and to open and remove its contents. The spectator does so and when asked to show what is written on the folded sheet of paper, there boldly printed is the number "20!" (Applause!) That's because the sum total of the two problems on every card is "20."

FINAL THOUGHTS:

It takes a lot of explaining, but "Flasher" actually moves quickly. More important, no difficult moves are required. The key to the deception is quite simply, the use of the roughed pair to innocently demonstrate that the totals arrive at by adding together either the top two numbers or the bottom two numbers produces totals other than the ones needed to successfully perform the initial effect, 9 or 11. The subtle peek of the back of the second spectator's selected card (which reveals the problem on the opposite side) is also quite sneaky. And the freedom of all three selections makes the mystery all the more unfathomable.

Naturally the effects can be performed separately. Or for one spectator instead of three. A very simple variation of the second effect can be accomplished by using Annemann's over the shoulder peek (as in the Mystery of the Blackboard). The spectator is allowed to thoroughly mix the cards and to square them up on the table in front of him (as in close-up). The performer has his back turned throughout the shuffle.

The performer asks the spectator to cut the pack anywhere and to complete the cut. Waiting for a few seconds, allowing the spectator sufficient time to complete the cut, the performer turns his head and looking over his shoulder, he asks, "Have you done that?"

Quickly noting the problem showing on top of the tabled deck (for example 5 + 6) the performer immediately turns his head away. Naturally, the performer now knows that the problem on the hidden side of the top card of the tabled deck is 6 + 3. He arrives at this conclusion by subtracting 5 from 11 (6) and 6 from 9 (3). The performer remembers the problem 6 + 3 and then asks the spectator to turn over the top card of his shuffled pack and to memorize the addition problem he sees (6 + 3). The spectator is then asked to shuffle the deck before the performer turns around. Now, the effect can be finished as previously described.

Readin', Writin' & 'Rithmetic

This routine could well be the best of the lot for many performers. You simply use the flash cards as one item in a three prediction (one ahead) effect. The other items that you'll need are a children's story book and a children's chalkboard (slate). You'll also require some chalk, a wine glass, pen and a small pad. You patter about how simple things were when you were learning readin', writin' and 'rithmetic, as a child in elementary school. Any spectator is asked to imagine that he's in geography class in elementary school and learning the names of foreign countries. He's asked to think of one country in particular. The performer appears to concentrate intently and then writes something on the small pad (you print the number, "20"). Without showing what he has written, the performer tears off the page, folds it in quarters, and drops it in the wine glass. The spectator is now asked to call out the country he is thinking of, for example, "Africa." The spectator is instructed to print the word "Africa" next to the number "1" on the slate.

Showing a children's reader, the book is then handed to a spectator who's asked to pretend that he's a young child. The spectator is then instructed to open the book to any page and to remember any word on that page. The performer writes something on the pad, tears it off, folds it and drops it in the wine glass. (You print the country "Africa" on the slip). Now, the spectator is asked to call out the word he was concentrating on. For example, the spectator responds, "Balloon!" The performer writes the numbers 1, 2 and 3 vertically, one under the other, aligned on the left on the chalkboard. Handing the chalkboard to the second spectator, he is requested to print the word "Balloon" next to the number "2."

Finally, a third spectator is asked to solve a problem in addition. The addition flash cards are removed from the box. The performer explains that there are 50 cards with 50 different problems in addition printed on each side. A total of 100 different problems. Tossing aside the "Identi-sign" card, the performer explains that he wants the spectator to mix the cards and to select any card. He is then to add together the totals of both sides of his freely selected card. To demonstrate, the performer shows that the top card of the deck is 10 + 5 which of course, totals "15." Turning the top card over (actually two roughed cards as previously described) the performer notes that the problem on the reverse side is 6 + 0 which totals "6". Adding the totals of both sides together (15 + 6) the grand total is "21."

The cards are then handed to the spectator for mixing. While the cards are being mixed, the performer jots something down on his pad (you print the word "balloon") and after folding it in quarters, drops it in the wine glass. The spectator is now told to remove any card and to add together the totals on both sides. The spectator does so and when asked states that the grand total is "20!". The performer tells the spectator holding the chalkboard to write the number "20" next to the number three on the slate.

To finish, the performer dumps the three folded slips onto the table. The third spectator is asked to unfold the slips and to read aloud the COUNTRY printed on one of them. The spectator has to respond, "Africa" since only one of the slips has the name of a country on it. The performer retrieves the slate and puts a check mark in chalk to the right of the first item, "Africa." The performer asks the third spectator to read aloud the WORD printed on one of the two remaining slips. The spectator does so and responds, "Balloon." The performer puts a check mark next to the word "Balloon" on the slate. Two down and one to go. Finally, the performer asks the third spectator to call out the NUMBER written on the third slip. He does so and responds, "20." The performer checks off the third and final item on the slate, the number "20." All three predictions are right on the money.

The use of three well known items associated with elementary school make this a truly baffling triple prediction. In addition, by asking for the slips to be read as described, you very subtly force the spectator to read the predictions in the correct 1-2-3 order.

Another Book Test

Using the procedure described to execute effect #1, you can do a pretty effective "Pegasus Page" book test.

Effect:

The performer has the deck of flash cards examined and shuffled. An empty envelope is handed out for examination. It is sealed by a spectator and placed in a leather wallet by the performer. The spectator is asked to initial the envelope for identification purposes. The wallet is then placed on a table in full view of the audience. A hard bound novel is also displayed and placed on the table.

A spectator is asked to cut the pack and to add together the TOP numbers on the front and back of his freely selected card on top of the deck. The performer demonstrates how this is to be done. The spectator does so and is asked to remember the total arrived at. The deck is handed to a second spectator who is asked to mix the cards and cut same. He is asked to add together the BOTTOM numbers on the front and back of his card and to remember his total as well. The performer then boxes and discards the flash cards in his pocket.

The novel is handed to a third spectator. The performer asks the first person to call out the total he is concentrating upon. The spectator responds, "11!" The performer boldly writes the number "11" on a piece of white cardboard. Turning to the second spectator, the performer asks him to call out the total he is thinking of. The second spectator responds, "9!" The performer writes the number 9 next to the number 11 and points out that two volunteers have randomly created a 3 digit number, "119."

The spectator holding the novel is asked to turn to page 119 in the book he is holding. The spectator does as requested and responds that page 119 is MISSING from the book. The performer opens the wallet and asks the spectator who examined and initialed the empty envelope to remove and open the sealed envelope after identifying the initials on the flaps as his own. The spectator does so and finds that mysteriously, the missing page 119 has materialized inside the signed, sealed envelope.

The method is sheer simplicity. The page is forced using the "Flasher" principle. The top two numbers on EVERY card add up to "11" and the bottom two numbers add up to "9." The performer uses the two roughed cards as his "demonstrator" which produces page number 165 using the 10 + 6 and the 5 + 0 roughed set as an example. Page 119 is torn from a novel, folded and sealed in a manila envelope. This envelope is placed in one side of a Himber wallet. A matching, empty envelope is the one which is examined and sealed by the spectator. After the performer places the envelope in the wallet, he asks the spectator if he initialed the flap? Naturally the spectator responds that he did not. The performer opens the wallet to the loaded envelope in the opposite side and asks the spectator to print his initials on the flap. The wallet is then closed and placed on the table.

After the number 119 is forced and the spectator has discovered that the page is missing, the performer opens the Himber wallet to the side containing the initialed envelope with the missing page inside. Once the spectator has removed the envelope and identified the initials on the flap, the performer pockets the wallet. Bingo! The envelope is opened and the missing page 119 is produced. Another triumph for the miracle worker.

Larry Becker presents "THE INCREDIBLE WALLET"

There are few mental effects that are as clean as this. Imagine taking a beautifully crafted wallet from your hip pocket. Without any hesitation, you immediately toss the wallet into the audience, asking the person who caught it to open it. Inside the wallet are several pockets, credit cards, and currency. In one small pocket, a card is protruding with the words "Your Thought"printed on it.

The spectator is asked to remove the card from the wallet. On the reverse side there is an empty circle. The spectator is tossed a pen or pencil and is asked to think of a three digit number. Any number over a hundred, but under a thousand. The spectator is then instructed to write his three digit number in the circle and to replace the card in the wallet as they had originally found it. The performer has his back turned as the spectator records his thought of number. The spectator is now asked to close the wallet and to secure it with an attached strap. When he has done this, the performer tells the spectator to toss him the wallet.

The performer replaces the wallet in his hip pocket and proceeds to pick up a piece of cardboard and a bold marking pen. The spectator is asked to concentrate on his three digit number. The performer jots something down and tosses the piece of cardboard on his table.

When the spectator calls aloud the number he's thinking of, for example, 813, the performer shows what is written on the cardboard. It's the number "813."

Remember, the wallet you toss into the audience may be freely handled by the spectator. The pocket containing the card the spectator writes on is isolated from the exterior of the wallet by several thicknesses of leather, currency and credit cards. This is dynamite and it's clean as a pin. Nothing is added or taken away. No sleights. No forces. No nail writing. What's more, this is just one of many different routines that are possible with the "Incredible Wallet." You can predict numbers, letters, prices, the amount of change in a spectator's pocket. The sky's the limit.

Predict both a freely selected card and its position in a deck of cards.

That's right. Imagine having from one to three spectators freely create any one of 52 cards in a deck which is on the table in full view. As the spectators create the color, suit and value of their card, the performer draws a picture of their choice on a blank card which he had previously removed from his wallet. When the drawing is finished, the performer tosses his wallet to any spectator and has them open it. Inside, protruding from one of the pockets is a card with the following statement printed on it. The statement reads, "Your card is." The spectator is asked to remove the card and read aloud what is printed on the reverse side. It reads, "23 cards from the top of the deck!"

Any spectator is now asked to remove the 52 cards from the card case on the table, and to count down to the 23rd card. When this card is turned face up, it is seen to be the freely selected card created by the spectators. Remember, the spectator in the audience freely handles the wallet. It is he who removes and reads aloud what is printed on the card. No forces. No switches. No carbon impressions. No nail writing, etc.

The Incredible Wallet is an ingenious piece of apparatus that you will use. Comes complete with a beautiful black English leather, hip pocket style wallet and detailed instructions. Only $125.00 plus $5.00 for priority mail and handling anywhere in the U.S. Overseas, please add $15.00 for airmail delivery. Visa & Mastercard accepted. Include name, credit card number and the expiration date.

This prop was previously sold as the "Incredible Wallop." It's that too! But what really gave it an exciting new life is the first routine described on this page. A usage that eluded Larry for many years. Now, it's a real killer! The perfect opener for your act! Get it while they're in stock!

The Incredible Wallet Instructions

HOW IT WORKS:

The wallet you have received has a window containing an ID card on one side. To access a prediction card which is located in a pocket inside the wallet, lightly press the pad of the left thumb against the center of the ID card (located on the outside of the wallet) and slide it in a downward direction until a secret cut out oval is visible. The card you see through this oval window is actually the back of a prediction card positioned in one of two small pockets inside the wallet.

Open the wallet and note that the card on the right as you look at it, is the prediction card. You will note that there is a replica of a credit card and paper currency in the pocket behind the prediction card. These are included to show you how to position a real (outdated) credit card and one or two bills behind it. If you remove the credit card and currency, you'll note they are glued together and a corner of the credit card and bill(s) has been cut away to permit the back of the prediction card to show through the secret oval cut-out behind the ID card.

When you look at the back of the prediction card showing through the secret cut-out oval, you'll notice several pencil dots. I do this to enable me to know precisely where digits will be later filled in to complete the prediction. Also, please note that while it's a rather simple matter to keep the ID card side of the wallet away from the audience's view while performing, it isn't critical if they see it when the ID card is in place. It simply appears to be an ID card with a name and address in the event you lose the wallet.

The cards in the pocket adjacent to the prediction card pocket are the ones you use to record the numbers called out by members of the audience. In other words, you begin each routine by removing the wallet from your pocket, opening and removing a blank card. You then close the wallet, snapping it shut. Holding the wallet in the left hand, secretly pull down the ID card in the window as described above. Naturally, the opposite side of the wallet faces the audience. (Note: I found that since you initially remove and hold the wallet with the ID side away from the audience's view, you can also begin with the ID card in the down position, and the secret window exposed. This means you only have to close the window by sliding the ID card upward after the necessary iinformation has been scretly written on the back of the prediction card). Place the blank card adjacent to the oval cut-out window where it is held in place by the left thumb. This enables you to double write the information called out by the audience as is required in the first routine described. The digits are printed first on the prediction card through the cut-out window (to ensure legibility), then as you ask if there was any particular reason why the spectator chose that particular number, you double write the same digit larger on the loose, blank card. The double writing is repeated with any subsequent digits that are required.

After double writing the numbers called out by the spectators, your left thumb should slide the ID card upward, back into place. Then, holding the checking card so the audience can see the number created, you toss the wallet, address side down on the table. You then invite a spectator to come forward, open the wallet and remove the small card marked

"Prediction!" from the pocket on the right. Be sure to practice sliding the address card until you get the feel ofjust how much pressure is required and how to slide it neatly and cleanly back in place.

One of the effects I perform with this wallet is the prediction of a 2 or 3-digit number created by spectators in the audience. Since any imbecile can easily remember a 3-digit number, why does the performer have to write it down? Well, the way I do it, as the three spectators create their 3-digit number, I record it near the top of the loose checking card. Then, I have a fourth spectator rearrange the three digits called out, creating a new 3-digit number. This new number is also recorded on the card, below the first one. Now, I ask a fifth spectator to play "One up or One Down." In other words, say the original number was 123. The fourth spectator rearranged it into 312. Now, a fifth spectator is asked whether the first digit should be one up (a 4) or one down (a 3). This is repeated with the remaining two digits. For example, the fifth spectator changes the number to 403...a number you couldn't possibly have known in advance. Naturally, the final number 403 is the one you record through the cut-out window onto the prediction card inside the pocket in the wallet. Now, you have a legitimate reason to record the numbers on the loose card. It also seems to rule out any possibility of pre-arrangement and makes the final revelation even more miraculous.

Another excellent routine that I have used with considerable success involves inviting the audience to take an imaginary trip anywhere in the world aboard the supersonic jet, Concorde. To prepare for this, place three light pencil dots on the prediction card through the secret window as previously described. Remove the card and to the above an below the space with the dots write in black ink, any times, i.e., 8:13 and 5:38. If there's still room at the bottom, write a third time, i.e., 11.39. Now, using a red marking pen, draw a circle around the area with the three dots, leaving room for later writing in a fourth "time" created by the audience members. Replace the prediction card in the pocket with the blank side out. Print the word, "Prediction" across the exposed portion of the card.

To perform, open the wallet and remove a blank card. Place it below or next to the widow as previously described. The ID card should be slid into the down position. Explain that several members of the audience will randomly create the exact time the Concorde will land at its destination. Have a spectator call out any city in the world. Record it across the top of the blank card being held against the window side of the wallet. Now have someone call out a number from "1" through "12", for example, "10." Record the number 10 over the first dot on the prediction card showing through the secret window. Insert a colon to the right of the this number (10:) As you ask a second spectator to call out any number from "1" through "5", for example, "4", double write the first number (10:) on the checking card. Record the second digit (4) to the right of the colon (10:4) on the prediction card and then on the checking card. Finally, ask a third spectator for any number from "1" through "9", for example "6" (10:46). Fill-in this number on both cards.

Point out that three members of the audience have created the time 10:46. As you say this, close the secret window and hand the wallet to a nearby spectator. Look at the time on the checking card and ask another spectator whether the time should be AM or PM? However the spectator responds, record it after the 10:46 on the checking card. This subtle bit of misdirection has you writing something on the card while a spectator has the wallet in his or her possession.

Recap what has transpired. Three members of the audience have combined their thoughts to create a time of day, 10:46, that the Concorde might land in (name the destination city). Ask the spectator holding the wallet to open it and to remove the small card marked "Prediction." Explain that earlier in the evening you had a premonition. In fact, you had several premonitions...four times that the Concorde might land at its destination city. However, at the last minute you circled one of the times in red ink. Ask the spectator to read aloud the time circled in red. Naturally, it will be "10:46."

Incredible Wallet Addendum

The following routine is one that I have used in convention close-up performances for close to 20 years. It has received quite a bit of praise from my peers. Once you've had a chance to use it, I'm sure you'll agree, it's an outstanding effect.

Effect:

The performer places a pack of playing cards on the table. Then, he opens his wallet and removes a blank card. The performer states that he is going to have several members of the audience create a playing card, one piece at a time. Any spectator is asked to call out either red or black. For example, the spectator chooses "red." The performer asks a second spectator to choose either of the two red suits. The spectator replies, "Hearts." The performer explains that he will draw a heart on the blank card, which he proceeds to do. A third spectator is asked to choose any value from ace through the king, for example, the spectator chooses "4." The performer states that he will complete his portrait of the spectator's randomly selected card, the four of hearts.

When he has finished, the performer tosses his wallet to a member of the audience. Showing what he has drawn on the card, the audience sees a rectangle with a heart and the numeral "4" inside the heart. The performer signs the drawing, stating (with a smile) that it will undoubtedly be worth a fortune some day. The audience member who caught the wallet is asked to open the wallet. The performer states that in one of the pockets, there is a card that has something written on it. The spectator is asked to read it aloud. It says, "Your card is-." "Remove the card and continue reading aloud the message on the reverse side," the performer states. The spectator does so, saying, " 14 cards from the top of the deck!"

The performer asks one of the spectators to remove the cards from the box and to count the cards, face down, one at a time, until he or she reaches the 14th card from the top of the deck. When the 14th card has been dealt, the performer asks the spectator to turn it face up and to call out its identity. The spectator does so and replies, "the four of hearts!"

To Prepare

On the prediction card, print the phrase, "Your card is-" across the top of one side. Place the card in the right hand inside pocket so the wording is visible. Open the secret window and center two light pencil dots on the exposed reverse side of the prediction card. Remove the prediction card and turn the dot side up. Continue the prediction message as follows:

Replace the card in the right hand pocket so the line, "Your card is" is visible above the edge of the right hand pocket. Place a blank card in the left hand pocket as previously described in the original instructions.

Stack the pack of playing cards as follows: Using the S-H-C-D order arrange the deck from the top down in numerical order. In other words, the top four cards of the deck will be the four Aces, AS, AH, AC, AD and the bottom four cards of the deck will be the four Kings, KS, KH, KC and KD. Replace the cards in the box. You'll also need to pocket the same pen used to write the prediction.

Follow the routine as described under the "effect." After removing the blank card, close the wallet, keeping the ID side away from the audience's view. Place the blank card on the ID card side of the wallet, as you simultaneously open the secret window. Position the blank card to the right of the window so you can write on both, the blank card and on the portion of the prediction card showing through the window.

Have the spectator's choose the color and suit. Draw a rectangle on the blank card. Inside the rectangle, draw the selected suit. In our example, that would be the outline of a heart. When the value is selected, print it in the center of the heart. You now have a drawing of a heart with the numeral "4" inside. Now, state that you will embellish your masterpiece. Simultaneously, perform the following simple mathematical procedure in your mind.

(2) Always multiply the answer by "4", i.e., 3 x 4= 12

(3) Add the value of the selected suit to the total as follows:

Add 1 if the selected suit is spades. Add 2 if the suit is hearts. Add 3 if the selected suit is clubs. Add 4 if the selected suit is diamonds. In our example this would give the following result, 12 + 2= 14. (Note: The S-H-C-D order of the suits is easy to remember, it's a numeric mnemonic). Think of the spade as having one point. The heart has two humps. The club has three clovers. And the diamond, four points). This means the selected card, the four of hearts, is the 14th card from the top of the deck. Enter the numeral 14 over the two pencil dots in the secret window. With the left thumb, slide the ID card upward, hiding the secret opening. Hand the wallet to any spectator, asking him or her to hold the wallet for a moment. Finish your portrait of the card created by three members of the audience by signing your name across the bottom of the card. State that undoubtedly the drawing will be worth a lot more in future years if it is signed by the artist. Smile as you say this, tongue in cheek.

Display the drawing to the audience as you proudly exclaim, "here is, my drawing of the four of hearts. Pretend that you hear a negative reaction from the audience and state, "No need to make fun. I'm a mind reader, not an artist!" Now, ask the spectator holding the wallet to open it and "please read aloud what is written across the card in the pocket in front of my credit cards and money." This is very important. It positions the prediction card in front of your credit card(s) and money, in the audience's collective minds. Now have the card removed, turned over and the balance of the message read aloud as described under the "effect."

Finish the effect as described previously. It's a very strong effect.

Addendum to The Incredible Wallet

It's been so long since I first began to market this wallet, I can only guess that it was, perhaps, 15 to 18 years ago. During all those years I developed the routines that are described in the accompanying instructions. It was originally called, "The Incredible Wallop-Wallet." In short, all of the routines were predictions that were accomplished by what is commonly referred to as "double-writing." The unique construction of the wallet provided the performer with secret access to a prediction card in a pocket situated on the inside of the wallet, and apparently inaccessible unless the wallet were opened and the card removed. After you've perused the instructions for the original routines, you'll understand and appreciate the ingenious design that not only makes it a snap to double write on the prediction card, but also permits the spectator to freely handle the wallet.

Several months ago I was enjoying an afternoon session with Joel Bauer, my very good friend and one of America's most innovative and successful corporate entertainers. Joel had never seen the "Incredible Wallet." As he examined it and familiarized himself with the working, I suddenly saw something I had never seen before. A spectator's perspective of viewing the wallet. It was in that instant that lightning struck and I realized something that had eluded me for 15 years. The wallet would make a sensational "peek" device. This new variation has now been audience tested, and I was right. It's a killer way to use this remarkable, hip pocket style wallet. Here's the new and, in my opinion, best way to utilize The Incredible Wallet.

The wallet has been set-up to perform this new routine. When you open the wallet, you see a card with the words, "Your thought" protruding above the edge of the right hand pocket. In the left hand pocket, I've placed two postage stamps. In the compartment behind these two small pockets are a replica of U.S. paper currency and a credit card. These two objects have been stuck together with a piece of double sided Scotch brand tape. The lower right hand corner of both the bill and the credit card has been cut away. This is to clear an unobstructed access to the back of the card with the words, "Your Thought" on it. Naturally, you should substitute a genuine $20 bill or a $10 bill or a $5 bill or a combination of a higher denomination bill with several $1 bills attached behind it plus one of your old credit cards. In the pocket behind these two objects, at the far non-critical end of the wallet are a few spare cards. If you remove and turn over the card bearing the words, "Your thought," you'll see a circle and a continuing printed message that reads, "is the number I'm thinking of. Can you read my mind?" Now, for the best part. Turn the wallet over.

On the exterior of the wallet is a window containing an identification card that has been personalized for you. It has been made to look as if it were an ID card behind an acetate window. The reverse side of the card is covered with a slippery waxed surface. Hold the wallet in your left hand, with the ID card facing you, place your left thumb on the face of the ID card and slide the card in a downward direction, approximately 3/4 of an inch. You should now see an oval window in the side of the wallet, exposing a portion of the back of the card which is inside the inner right hand pocket. The card with the words. "Your thought" on it. The cut-out oval coincides with the oval drawn on the back of the aforementioned card. In other words, if the spectator wrote a 3-digit number inside this oval (in your instructions to the spectator, you refer to it as "an empty circle"), you could see it through the cut-out if the ID card is lowered.

The Effect:

There are few mental effects that are as clean as this. Imagine taking a beautifully crafted wallet from your hip pocket. Without any hesitation, you immediately toss the wallet into the audience, asking the person who caught it to open it. Inside the wallet are several pockets, credit cards, and currency. In one small pocket, a card is protruding with the words "Your Thought" printed on it.

The spectator is asked to remove the card from the wallet. On the reverse side there is an empty circle. The spectator is tossed a pen or pencil and is asked to think of a three digit number. Any number over a hundred, but under a thousand. The spectator is then instructed to write his three digit number in the empty circle and to replace the card in the wallet as he had originally found it, with the words "Your Thought" facing him. The performer has his back turned as the spectator records his thought of number. The spectator is now asked to close the wallet and to secure it with the attached strap. When he has done this, the performer tells the spectator to toss him the wallet.

The performer replaces the wallet in his pocket and proceeds to pick up a piece of cardboard and a bold marking pen. The spectator is asked to concentrate on his three digit number. The performer jots something down and tosses the piece of cardboard on his table. When the spectator calls aloud the number he's thinking of, for example, 813, the performer shows what is written on the cardboard. It's the number "813."

To Perform:

The description of the effect says it all. Follow the action to the point where you ask the spectator to open the wallet. State that inside the wallet, in front of your credit cards and money, is a pocket containing a card with the words, "Your thought" on it. The reason you mention the credit card and money is simple. People will automatically NOT touch your money and credit cards. (If they do, you're working to the wrong crowd.) This subtle phrase keeps the spectator from examining the wallet in any way. He will simply follow your instructions. Now, ask him to remove the card and turn it over. Toss him a pen or pencil, preferably the same pen which you used to write on the small card. Instruct him to think of a 3-digit number. Have him write it in the "empty circle" on the card to more indelibly burn the image into his mind. State that you will turn your back as he does this. Ask that he tell you when he's finished.. Now tell him to replace the card back in the pocket as he found it, with the words, "Your thought" facing him. It's important that you be specific here to prevent the card from being replaced incorrectly.

When he's finished, tell him to toss the wallet back to you. At this point, I generally hold out my left hand, as if to catch it. As the wallet comes flying back, hopefully in a soft arc, I purposely miss catching it as I continue to stare at the spectator. The wallet lands on the floor to one side. I continue to stare at the spectator as I remark, sarcastically, "Good throw." The audience will laugh as you bend down and pick up the wallet, turning to your left to do so. Pick up the wallet with the left hand so that the ID card will be under the left thumb. As you straighten up and face the audience, allow the left thumb to pull down the ID card, exposing the spectator's 3-digit number through the cut-out. Quickly note and remember the number. This action all happens in the act of picking up the wallet. With the left thumb, push the ID card back in position, covering the secret opening. Don't fuss if the card is not lined up exactly, just do it. Immediately place the wallet in your left rear pants pocket. Practice this entire sequence until you do it smoothly, without thinking.

Naturally, you can dispense with the humorous throw and miss and simply ask the spectator to return your wallet. As soon as he hands it to you, ask him to be seated. Now, without looking at it and holding the wallet in your left hand, pull down the ID card. Bring your right hand up to the right side of your forehead. Ask the spectator to picture his 3-digit number in his mind. As he does this, pensively glance down, but not at, the wallet. Stare at the floor. It should appear that you are also concentrating. At the last instant, you suddenly say, "Sir!" Now, while your eyes are still looking down at the floor, quickly cop a peek at the spectator's number an instant before your head raises to look at the spectator. The "Sir" will direct attention to the spectator, looking at him reinforces the misdirection, as you continue speaking. "Picture the number as if it's appearing on a large movie screen." As you say this, replace the wallet in whatever pocket you're comfortable with. I always return it to the pocket it came from.

It's all over except the acting. Pick up the posterboard and proceed to finish the effect as previously described. One other thing. The side of the card on which the spectator fills in his number contains the following message-"is the number I am thinking of. Can you read my mind?" Naturally, this message is used to fill out the balance of that side of the card. Otherwise, the circle in the upper left corner would look ridiculous. Here's how you can use what's written on the card to your advantage. When the spectator does what you have requested and writes his 3-digit number in the empty circle, he will not fully understand the reason for the balance of the message, but he assumes it's what he might have wrote concerning the number he's thinking of. Since the rest of the audience never sees the card, they assume there's only an empty circle on it. Later, after you have replaced the wallet in your pocket and written the spectator's number on the piece of cardboard, glance at the spectator and state, "You've thought of a three digit number...a number that you have in your mind at this very moment. Is that correct?" He'll respond, "Yes." You continue, "And you want me to read your mind, is that correct?" Since he saw that as part of the message on the card, he'll respond in the affirmative. The rest of the audience will think you just read his mind by knowing what he is thinking at that very moment. Just a bit of frosting on the cake as you ask him to call aloud his number...and show that you knew that as well.

I can't begin to tell you how truly powerful and clean this effect is. The casualness with which you handle the wallet is totally disarming. No one would ever suspect that the wallet had anything to do with your discerning the spectator's thought of number. If it were a trick or gimmicked wallet, you would never hand it out and allow a member of the audience to open it, etc. When I do it, the wallet is totally out of the way and in my pocket before I attempt to read the spectator's mind. Go forth and do likewise. Incidentally, if you want to minimize the damage to the bill you place behind the credit card, look at the sample that came with your wallet. You'll notice that the bill has been cut and the corner bent back instead of being completely severed from the bill. Should you ever be short of cash and want to use the bill, a one inch length of Scotch Brand Magic Tape will quickly restore the bill like new.

When I think about it, I find it totally amazing that it took me so many years to realize that the wallet could be used as a perfect peek device. Fortunately for all of us, I eventually did.

Quality crafted by England's Roy Roth. Now available exclusively in the U.S. from Larry Becker!

Larry Becker's Surprising

"Here, There & Everywhere"

An unpublished NO SLEIGHT routine for the fabled BENDIX WALLET in a luxurious black English leather. Plus 15 powerful routines from Maven & Giobbi to Marlo & more!

EFFECT: A deck of cards is shuffled and shown to consist of 52 well mixed playing cards. The cards are fanned and a spectator is invited to merely think of ANY card. The card is removed and the spectator signs his name across the face of the card. For example, the 4 of hearts. The performer opens his wallet and removes an envelope. The spectator is invited to print the name of his card across the face of the envelope. The spectator's card (the 4H) is then sealed in the envelope which he is instructed to hold so the audience can see it. The performer's open wallet is placed in the spectator's other hand.

Turning to a second spectator, the performer states that while the first spectator thought of a card, he (the second spectator) will select his card by chance. The performer riffles the deck and stops whenever the spectator calls "stop."The card where the spectator called "stop" is shown and dealt face down between the palms of the spectator's hands. To prove he isn't cheating, the performer turns the next few cards face up. "Is your card there?" the performer asks. The spectator responds "No!" "Of course not", the performer responds, "It's between the palms of your hands. After the laugh, the performer discards the balance of the deck. The first spectator is asked to call out the name of his card, which is written across the envelope (4H). The spectator opens the envelope and discovers the Jack of clubs. "What card did you select?", the performer asks the second spectator. "The second spectator responds, "The Jack of clubs." Then what card is between your palms?" the performer asks. When the spectator looks he exclaims, it's "blank!" The performer then has the first spectator open the zippered compartment in the performer's wallet. The performer removes a single card from the pocket. It's the first spectator's signed card, the 4 of hearts.

Complete with a luxurious Bendix style black leather wallet, cards & detailed instructions. Only $125.00plus $6.50 Insured S&H. Overseas, add 20% additional for airmail. Visa & Mastercard accepted. Include name, number and expiration.

Larry Becker's PROFESSIONAL MENTALISM^P.O. Box 6023 Carefree, AZ 85377^Phone or fax: (480) 488-0980

Here, There & Everywhere

Hopefully you have my videotapes, "Standing Ovation (Vol. 1) and Mental Masterpieces (Vol. 2). The reason, it's much easier to understand the working of this effect after viewing the performance and explanation on videotape. However, there are one or two small, but very important details that were not explained on the video. So please read on.

Effect:

The performer displays a well mixed deck of 52 different playing cards and has two spectators randomly select one playing card each from the shuffled deck. The first spectator merely thinks of any card that he sees as the cards are spread face up. This spectator signs his name across the card he is thinking of, for example, the 10 of spades. He's now asked to print the name of his mentally selected card boldly on the front of an envelope. His card is then sealed in the envelope which he displays in full view of the audience. This spectator is also asked to hold the performer's wallet in his other hand.

The second spectator randomly selects his card, for example, the 3 of hearts, which the performer deals face down between the palms of the spectator's hands. The next four or five cards on top of the deck are then turned face up so the spectator can confirm that his card is not present and nothing "sneaky" has been done by the performer. This business always gets a laugh. The performer says, "Is your card here?" The spectator, of course, responds, "No!" The performer retorts, "Of course not! It's between the palms of your hand!" The deck of cards is then discarded.

The second spectator is asked to reveal the identity of the card between the palms of his hands, for example, the 10 of spades. When the performer asks the spectator to turn over the card between the palms of his hands, it turns out to be BLANK. The performer asks, "Who put you up to that...Kreskin?" The audience laughs.

Turning to the first spectator, the performer has him call out the name of his mentally selected card which sealed inside the envelope. The spectator replies, "the 3 of hearts." The spectator is asked to tear open the envelope and to remove his mentally selected, signed card, the 3 of hearts. When this is done, instead of his card, the spectator removes the second spectator's randomly selected card, the 10 of spades.

Pausing for a moment, the performer notes that not only has the second spectator's card vanished from between the palm of his hands...it has mysteriously appeared inside the sealed envelope the first spectator is holding. The first spectator is now asked to open the zippered compartment inside the performer's wallet which also gets a laugh since the performer holds the open wallet just below his waist as he asks the spectator to pull down his zipper. (guaranteed laugh). The performer then reaches inside th

Friendly Persuasion

Friendly Persuasion

To do this successfully you need to build a clear path of action by using tools if necessary. These tools would be facts, evidence and stories which you know they can relate to. Plus you always want to have their best interests at heart, in other words, you know what is good for them

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