One In A Million

If you don't mind doing a little extra work (but no additional sleight of hand), you may want to add this extra kicker as a finale for MIAMI OPENER. WHAT THE AUDIENCE SEES The same effect as MIAMI OPENER, only for a finale it is discovered that the bottom cards of the packets match as well TO PERFORM Begin the routine exactly as before, up to the point where the spectator has replaced their selection, and you have controlled it to the bottom of the deck while bringing its three mates to the top...

Turnaround Ii

This routine is an impromptu handling of the preceding trick, and in some ways a better routine. No gimmicked cards are used, the trick starts with a shuffled deck, and there is an additional effect at the finale. More importantly, you end clean as a whistle. It is a favorite of my friend, Mike Skinner. Effect A card is selected and returned to the deck. Four Kings are taken from the top, and magically caused to reverse themselves. For a finale, the King whose suit matches that of the selected...

Miami Opener

If you open your performances with a new deck of cards (as many seasoned professionals seem to do) you may want to try this routine. It is relatively quick, looks impossible, and has a startling climax. WHAT THE AUDIENCE SEES A spectator freely selects a card from a shuffled deck. The card is replaced. The spectator is then allowed to cut off as many cards from the deck as she wishes. These cards are dealt into three face-down piles. The spectator is given the card box, and told that whatever...

Up The Sleeve

This impromptu routine is based on two clever ideas, one of Roger Klause's, the other of Dan Stapleton's. It originally appeared in Richard's Almanac. WHAT THE AUDIENCE SEES The magician pours the contents of a package of sugar into his left fist. The sugar disappears, only to reappear from the inside of a spectator's sleeve. SET-UP You will need a thumb tip and access to sugar packets. If no sugar is available, a salt shaker can easily be substituted The thumb tip is on your right thumb. TO...

The Big Stack

Although I never had the opportunity to see John Scarne perform in person, he was a frequent guest on the Mike Douglas and David Frost television programs in the late sixties, and his skillful and incredibly entertaining work with cards had a great impact on me. Scarne often began his performances by doing numerous flourishes, giving the deck several convincing shuffles, then dealing four strong poker hands with his own as the winner. Needless to say, the deck was stacked, and the shuffles...

Pretty Sneaky

This is an impossible looking location in which the spectator appears to do all the work, as well as handle and shuffle the cards throughout, yet the performer succeeds in finding the selected card. TO PERFORM Have the deck shuffled by a spectator, preferably one you will feel comfortable working with. Take the cards back, commenting on how dealers shuffle cards in Las Vegas and give the deck a perfect incomplete faro, leaving the cards telescoped for half their length (see illustration 1). It...

Observation Test

This simple trick is an elaboration of a routine of Dai Vernon's which was published by Karl Fulves many years ago. If performed properly, it can be quite humorous, and has a nice surprise ending. EFFECT The Ace of Spades and the Queen of Hearts continually change places, despite challenging conditions. SET-UP From the top - down, 9 of Diamonds, Queen of Hearts, Ace of Spades, and 8 of Diamonds on the bottom of the deck. These cards can be arranged ahead of time, or setup as you cull through...

Seven Jokers

I believe this is an original routine, from beginning to end. The handling is to the point and quite mystifying. WHAT THE AUDIENCE SEES Three cards are selected and shuffled into the deck. The magician removes seven Jokers from his wallet. Three of the Jokers are placed reversed among the other four Jokers. These three Jokers magically turn into the three selected cards. For a finale, the selections cleanly turn back into Jokers. SET-UP Have four Jokers followed by three cards (say 10S, AH and...

The Kings Holiday

This routine was inspired by Larry Jennings' Visitor (The Classic Magic of Larry Jennings), one of the finest routines for laymen in print. WHAT THE AUDIENCE SEES The magician produces the four Kings from the deck. The deck is cut in half, and the Kings are buried in one half, which is left in plain view on the table. Three spectators are invited to select cards from the other half of the deck, which is shuffled. This half is clearly shown to contain none of the spectator's selections on either...

Vanishing Aces The Sequel

The Vanishing Aces was the first good effect I ever originated, and still remains a constant in my repertoire. Over the years, I have met dozens of close-up magicians who have used the routine with similar success. The following crept into my work a few years back, and I have found it to be as well received as the original. EFFECT The four Aces are placed face-up on top of a face-down deck. One at a time, they disappear, despite the deck being spread after each vanish. For a finale, the deck is...

Newwave

This is one of the most magical routines I perform. WHAT THE AUDIENCE SEES The performer spreads through a blue deck and has a. spectator name any four-of-a-kind. These cards are removed and placed face-down on the table, in plain view. The performer then reaches into his pocket and removes four red-backed cards. These four cards are shown to be four Jokers. The magician snaps his fingers over the four Jokers, instructing them to change places with the spectator's four cards on the table. The...

Elevator Aces

Many laymen know at least a couple of basic card tricks. Routines which are universally popular are The 21 Card trick and tricks where the buried Aces rise to the top. This routine is a collaboration between myself and my friend Bill Malone, one of the best close-up artists in the country. It's simplicity underlies its great impact on lay audiences. WHAT THE AUDIENCE SEES A spectator freely removes four cards from the pack, which are revealed to be the four Aces. Each Ace is then cleanly lost...

The Free Cut Force

If I have learned any one significant lesson when working for laymen, it is that the more they handle the cards (or other props, for that matter), the more baffling the magic becomes. This is why the classic force has been a staple of so many commercial card-workers for so many years. The following force is simple and appears perfectly fair. I have often used it while performing a four Ace revelation, or when trying to locate a chosen card. EFFECT A spectator is asked to give a shuffled deck a...

Technicolor Mystery

This routine combines ideas from two of close-up magic's great artists Larry Jennings and Brother John Hamman. WHAT THE AUDIENCE SEES The magician removes four Kings from a blue deck and places them on the table. The magician then takes a red deck (it can be borrowed) and removes a single card, calling it the mystery card. The mystery card is placed in the magician's pocket for safe-keeping. A spectator then removes any card from the red deck. The red-backed selection is then placed among the...

Turnaround Kings

This is a relatively easy Twisting the Aces with a great deal of visual magic and a startling climax. To laymen, the ending looks like real magic, or so I've been told. The routine does use a gimmicked card however, a gaff-free variation immediately follows, which is just as good as the original, although slightly different in handling. EFFECT Four Kings are displayed and placed face-up on the table. A card is selected and lost in the deck. The Kings turn face-up and face-down in baffling...

The Capitulating Queens

I have carried this routine in my wallet for the past ten years, and think it is one of the most entertaining and utterly mystifying routines that can be performed with a small packet of cards. I have performed it for groups of one, and groups of fifty, always with equally satisfying results. This routine is also in the repertoire of Larry Jennings, who normally disdains routines using gimmicked cards. This is one of the easiest routines I do, yet perhaps the most mystifying to a lay audience....

Poker Interchange

Since its publication in Jeff Busby's Arcane in 1982, this routine has seen it all it has been performed on television on the BBC, and been used by some of close-up magic's best, including Darwin Ortiz, Paul Gertner, Bill Malone, Bruce Cervon, and Ed Mario. The routine has even spawned a new sleight, Bruce Cervon's Stripout Insertion Addition (Richard's Almanac. Issue 23-24) Although technically demanding, POKER INTERCHANGE is also tremendously entertaining. What follows is my original routine,...

Mental Chicago Opener

This is a nearly self-working effect (except for a double-lift) which packs an excellent wallop. WHAT THE AUDIENCE SEES The deck is shuffled by a member of the audience. Two spectators freely select cards. The cards are assembled and ribbon-spread across the table. An odd-colored card is seen in the deck. It proves to be the first spectator's card. When the card is turned over a moment later, it has turned into the second spectator's card. SET-UP Have an odd-colored card in your lap. Have its...

Dream Poker

Poker is a game that nearly every adult is familiar with. Movies like The Sting and The Cincinnati Kid as well as scores of television shows, have shown poker being played in enough detail that most people (even non-players) profess some knowledge of the game. What makes the following routine so much fun to perform is that it never comes out the same way twice You, as well as your audience, will be in the dark up to the very end. This routine will also leave a lasting impression on an audience....

The Js Count

Several years ago, while experimenting with a pretty one-card switch shown to me by Bill Malone, the following count was devised. The switch-move that makes the count so deceptive is one of the most versatile I have found, and can be used for virtually dozens of different effects. TO SHOW THREE CARDS TO BE THE SAME CARD Hold three cards in your left hand face down. The card you want to show as all three is the middle card of the packet. Perform a double-turnover, displaying this card (say the...

Impromptu Cheat

While in Las Vegas a few years ago, I happened to take a walk through the Golden Nugget casino at 2 a.m. A large crowd had gathered around a poker table, where a big Texan wearing a ten gallon hat had wagered a small fortune in chips on his hand. Standing on tip-toes, I watched the Texan slowly reveal his cards. King, Ten, King, Four The Texan paused on his last card. His two opponents in the game were showing, respectively, a pair of twos and a pair of Jacks, and three Queens. The Texan turned...

New Wave Prediction

This is as strong a mentalism routine as I have found using a single deck of cards. It can be performed either close-up, or before a large group. In either case, the impact is substantial. WHAT THE AUDIENCE SEES A deck of cards is shown and shuffled. Four spectators are allowed to make free selections. The deck is placed aside, and the performer removes four cards from his wallet. Each of these cards has a contrasting back design. The performer comments that earlier, he placed these cards in...

The Vernon Stripout Addition

Hold a deck face-up in your left hand, and obtain a left pinky break above the rear four cards none of these cards should be Aces . Spread through the cards and outjog the four Aces while maintaining your pinky break. Square the cards, leaving the Aces outjogged while inserting your right pinky into the break at the right side see illustration 1 . Your right hand firmly grips the cards while the left spreads the outjogged Aces to display their indices to the audience see illustration 2 . Your...

Mental Miracle

Years ago, Derek Dingle performed an effect where two spectators made mental selections of cards, the deck was shuffled face-up, face-down ala Triumph, and when the deck was finally spread, the only two face-down cards were the mentally selected cards. A wonderful effect, but the handling was not easy, and required that the spectators handle the cards to make their mental selections. This trick duplicates Dingle's effect, but the handling allows a spectator to mentally select any card in the...

John Bannons Discrepancy City Prediction

This is a revamping of Bannon's trick from IMPOSSIBILIA. EFFECT Three blue cards are placed on the table. A red deck is spread and a spectator makes a free selection. The three blue cards are shown to clearly match the selection. Everything may be examined at the conclusion. SET-UP A four card set-up is required. You need three identical blue cards say 10D and one red 10D. From top down blue 10D, blue 10D, face-up blue 10D, face-down red 10D. Have this packet in your pocket. TO PERFORM Spread...