Theater QFnfp Mfxv

Here, then,- is the madiematical formula for determining the range of possible positions that can be offered when the card rests at Positions One through Twenty-six in your stack: * '

If the card is at Position X from the tap (X< ~ZT)> it can be produced at any number from A'to X + 26.

In our example, the possible range would be from fifteen to forty-one. However, offering a choice of fifteen and forty-one sounds a trifle contrived. What you would do is to suggest casually that they call out ^sometbtngjrom^ sap fifteen to forty " In other words, pick two multiples of five or ten within die range thar sound reasonably random and casual, vet still seem to offer a wide .selection.

Once the number has been called out—thirty-five, say—subtract the actual position of the named card from this number; 35 -15 = 20. The answer is your key for if twenty cards arc counted off the "wrong' half of the pack (the half not containing die named card) and it is then secretly turned over to continue counting, die desired card will turn up at the correct number. This is the undedying logic of the method. (It also explains the formula setting the upper limit given earlier; that is, you can count no more than twenry-six cards off the lower half without exposing a face-up card.)

Bur how are we to handle cards lying at positions about twenty-six? Suppose, for instance, that the card resting at Position Fifty in your stack is named. You can hardly offer a choice of any number from fifty to fifty-two! However, there is a simple solution. The card at the fiftieth position will also be in the twenty-foiirth position when you turn the pack over.

Similarly any card in the reversed lower half will he brought to a higher location when the pack is inverted; but of course you have to know where. Working this out is quite simple. The rule is this:

For any position from twenty-seven upward, subtract twenty-six.

This will give its location when the pack is turned over. For example, if you know the card is thirty-sixth from top: 36 - 26 = 10.

I use a two-seep process for Girds located above twenty-six. 1 subtract diirty, an easy task; [hen I add four. In the example above, 36 - 30 = 6 + 4=10.

Therefore, the card will be tenth down when the pack is inverted. Consequently, you may produce it at any position between ten and thirty-six (rhe second 5gure is always the original location of die card, so there is no need to figure it out}.

With this understood, we come to the actual performance details, including the all-important matter of how and when to mm over die pack. For those

teaderc conversant with MDo You Want to Continue?" much of what follows will be familiar. . .

This trick should be performed dose-up at a table, eidier oxi a one-to-one ba^is or for a small'group. The pack, still in its case, is introduced and kid 011 rhc table.

Say to someone in the group. 'Wouldyou name any card in thep<tck? You have a totally free choice* which I will not attempt to influence in any way. for instance, you might decide on the six of clubs, the eight of diamonds., the. seven of spades or any cti*er card you like. The choice is entirely yours.

Your naming of several cards must be done casually, as if it is of no consequence. Its purpose, rhough, is to call out those cards dia; lie at or near die tops of die faced halves of your deck. These arc the most awkward ones to count 10, so you must subdy bias the spectator against choosing them. If rhc person persists in naming one of these cards, the effect can ¿till be achieved, but cards lying deeper arc to be preferred.

I ex's assume the king of clubs is named. Further presume that this card is rhc thirty-First in your memorized ¿tack. Knowing die location of the named card enables you to work out the positions at which it can be produced. In diis case, die card lies at a position higher :han twenty-six, so you subtract p.ven:y-six from this position: 31 - 26 = 5. Thus, die king of dubs will be fifth from rhc top when you turn the pack over. And consequently, a choice of locations between che fifth and thirty-first positions can be offered.

Turning to another member of the audience, you say, "Wouldyou call out any number from one and jijiy-two! Oh no, d;at might take too long! Make it any number from, say, five to rhirty Lets keep it a bit slyorter!'''

If five is chosen you are finished. The card is exactly where you need it, without your doing anything fiirthcr. Suppose, though, that the person choo^ twenty-three? You now luive to calculate 23 - 5 = 18. From diis, you know that eighteen cards must be counted from die "wrong" side of the pack before you secretly reverse it.

Pick up rhc card case and extract the deck in a fashion that places the named card, die king of clubs, in rhc lower half. Then, holding the cards in dealing position, start counting them lace down onto die table. Count hiirly slowly at this stage.

When you have dealt off the critical number, eighteen, pause, look at the group and say, * That's eighteen cards so far. I uwuler if the king of clubs is among xhemin

You must now subtly rev erse die balance of the deck. Your right hand provides misdirection for this by picking up the eighteen dealt cards and

turning them face up. In order to aid in -spreading these cards, your left hand rums palm down and sets the rest of the deck on the table, casually reversing .it in the process. Your attention, and the audiences, is focused on the right hands cards, which vou procecd to spread in search of die king of clubs.

When the king of dubs is not found, look at the spectators and say "It's getting interesting. " • .

Retrieve die tabled pack and resume counting, but from this time forth turn cach card lace up as you deal it. The tension should build. Slow'the dealing as you approach the sdecrcd number, and when you finally reachit, don't turn diat card over. Instead, slowly remove it from rhc dcck> then look at its face, hut show no emotion.

When you do place it on the tabic, try to assume the attitude of an adi-letc who is both happy and relieved diat he won a difficult competition. This behavior differs from the "look at me and how wonderful 1 am" behavior of many magicians and mentalists.

When you conclude this effect, it should long be remembered by your audiences.

Winter 1990

1 he rl hiifem-cfeck Solution •

Wl IEM I PERFORMED my faced-detk version of "Any Card ai Ally Number1 from die platform, the results were disappointing. To this day» that trick is one of the strongest close-up effects I perform. But the same approach doesn't play well tor larger audiences. The reason for this is, I believe, that the performer holds the deck and docs the dealing. While this procedure seems totally siir when rhe spectators arc a few feet away, it loses believabilicy at a distance.

If the spectator docs the counting, though, sleight-of-hand can be ruled out. When I realized this, I made some progress by adjusting the handling to allow a spectator to do some of the counting. A few years Liter I recalled how the National Magic Company Catalog had described a trick called "Attaboy," wh ich involved a wooden bellboy figure that held a deck of cards. I adopted this concept, but used a different method* By placing the deck in a cut-down card case hung on a loop of string. I could do rhe counting in a fashion chat placed the deck out of iny hands (see Club 77, Halloween 1996> p. 23).

But 1 still was not completely happy with rhe platform version. Five years ago with the help of my son David, who has a good grasp of .statistics, we developed a novel approach. In this method a sealed deck is kept in full view (ostensibly) throughout the presentation, and dicrc was an absolutely free choice of card and number. This second solution, which has never been published, requires thirteen decks of cards. It is logically sophisticated and possibly an over-complicared solution, yet it works, and I find it devious and pleasing. I'm included it here for your evaluation.

77if. fifty- two-deck solution; One way to have any card appear at any location i.s ro use fifty-two decks. Each deck would initially be stacked in the same order, but to make the trick work, each successive deck would rotate, the order by one card. For example, if the seven ol hearts starts its journey on top of the first deck, it would move to sccond position' in the second deck, dicn third position in die third deck, and so oil through fifty-two. If all fifty-two cards rotated in die same way in these decks, one could produce any of them at any number by using the proper deck of the fifty-two.

The solution is practicable, but it is neither pragmatic nor elegant.

¿'he tmvrs~sd( deck solirnos:t\\c number of decks needed to satisfy this problem could be reduced if counting to die chosen number could be initiated from eidier the top or die borrom of the deck. Every card would then have two locations. The seven of hearts, for example, could be both the first card from the top and the fifty-second card from the bottom. This ploy, then, would reduce the number of decks needed to twentv-six.

¡he twiween-deck solution: 1 stniggled to rind other ways of reducing the number of decks required, llien T asked my son, David, who is an epidemiologist and good at spatial problems, to help me with the task. His solution is fascinating. Rather than using twenty-six decks, ir is possible (with two exceptions} to have any card appear at any number with diineen dccks of cards. let mc explain liis system. However, let me assure you, like a car engine, you needn't understand how it works to use it.

In Davids insightful solution, we start with rhirteen identically arranged decks. We then split each deck in two, making two sets of twenty-six cards. Lets call die top twenty-sk cards of the tiradcck Set A and the bottom twenty-six cards Set B.

Move two cards from die bottom of Set A to the top. Do die same with Set B. Now place these two sets together, making a single deck again. This deck we will call Deck One.

Follow this same procedure with tlie second deck bu: this time move four cards from the bottoms to the rops of Sets A and B. Reassemble this dcck, which we will call Deck Two.

With each successive deck vou rotate two more cards than vou did with

the last Consequently, with Dcck'lwelvc you rotate twenty-four cards from borrom ro top. Deck'lliirtecn is left in the original stacked order. In the chart on die next page I've mapped out the positions each card occupies in each half of the thirteen decks. I have abbreviated the chart, since it is meant merdy to clarify the system. The stack order of your cards wili likely differ from mine, depending on which stack you prefer to use. lliis chart shows how the fifty-two cards rotate through thirteen decks in a predictable fashion.

The Master Chart

How Fifty-two Cards Rocäce 'l'hrough Tliirieen E)ccks (Abbreviated)

• •

5:acx own

»13 ■

*1

91

»3

m

9*> • h>

#7

«8

#9

#10

#11

<12

1

7*

1/52

3/50

5/48

7/46j

9/44

11/42 1j/40

15/33

17/36

19/34

21/32

23/30 25/23

2

4*

2/51

4/49

si 47

8/45

10'43

12/41 14/39

16/37

-.8/35

20/33

22/31

24/29 26/27

3

3'50

5/4«

7/46

-9/44"

11/42

13/4$ IS/38

17/36

19/34

21/32

23/3o!

25/2«

1/52

4

t '

* t

"A

: ■

* w

• *

•k »

A *

i

*

t »

i

24

24/29

26/271

2/51

4/49

6/47

8/45 flo/43

12/41

14/39

16/37

18/35

20/33

22/31

25

J*

25/2«

1/52

3/50

5/4«

7/46

9 <44 11/42

13/40

15'38

17/36

19/34 2i/32i23/3o

26

26/27

2/51

4/4 9

6/47

a/45

ID/43112/41

14/39

16/37

18/35

20/33 22/3l[24/29

Sei- A—Cards 1-26 Rotating

slmx OaDFJI

*13

91

*3

#4

#5 #6

97

«8

>9

#10

#11

♦12

27

27/26

29/24 31/22

33/20 35/IK

37/!6| 39/14

41/12 43/10 45/8

47/6

49/4

51/2

23

10*

28/25

30/23 32/21

34/19 36 /17

38/15] 40/'l3

42/j1

44'9

46/7

48/5

50/3

52/1

29

29/24

31/22

33/20

35/1«

37/16

39/14 41/12

43/10

45/8

y*

49/4

51/2

27/52

t

i

*

i

t 4

! 1

♦ i

i

4 »

A

50

4*

50/3

52/1

28/25

30/23

32/31

HM9 36/17

58/15,40/13

42/11

44/9

46/7

48/5

51

7*

51/2

27/26 29/24

31/22 33/20

35/li|37/l6

39/14 41/12

43/10

45/8

47/6

49/4

52

a*

52/1

28/25 30/23

32/21 34/191

36,'17|38/15

40/13)42/11

44/9

46/7

48/5

50/3

The horizontal axis identifies the thirteen docks. As mentioned above, diese decks arc initially arranged in the same order. After the cards in each successive deck have been rotated as described, this chart becomes a map or snapshot of the card order in each declc

'llie vertical axis has fifty-two positions, one for each of die cards. The stack order of die cards shown is die memorized one i use. You will wish to use a stack with which you are iamiliar. The top card in my memorized deck is the seven of hearts, and the bottom card the ace of diamonds.

For clarity I've selected *ix cards from each set. The top three in Set A of Deck Thirteen are the seven of hearts, four of spades and two of diamonds. The last three arc the five of dubs, jack of diamonds and four of diamonds Set B is similarly abbreviated, showing how six cards cycle their positions through die decks. For example- lets look at the four of spades. Note on the chart that this card is in lYaition Two: second from the top in Deck Thirteen.

As you follow it through each deck, sec how it goes two deeper until it arrives at the twenty-sixth position in Deck Twelve, Note diat the four of ¿pades does not go to die twenty-eighth spot, but instead cycles to the second position in Deck Thirteen. Now look at the four of clubs. It is fiftieth from the top in Deck Thirteen. In Deck One, it is in the fifty-second place,

tliOT twenty-eighth in Deck Two. A few minures of .study should make all this dear.

Next nodce that each card lias two positions, With, each pair of positions, the number lying bdore the virgule represents the position of the card from the top of the dcck, and "the number falling after is the position of the card counting from the race. \x)ctk for the ace ofdiamonds'on the matrix. Its position in DcckThirteen is fifty-second from die top.and one from the bottom. It Is the bottom card. Note again that as rhe cards rotate, their positions change by increments of two. In Deck One the accofdiamonds.is now twenty-eighth from the top and twenty-filth from die bottom.

Actually you do not have to worry about all rhis because rhc information from the Master Chart will be used to construct four cribs, one for each suit. While any cards location can be found in alJ decks with a mathematical approadi, the crib is probably more dependable and possibly fester. I keep my four crib sheets in a spiral notebook that I use during die performance to record the card and che number sdected. I make no attempt to hide them. I merely flip the page to rhe correct suit when rhe card is named. The crib, if ¿t were observ ed, would seem merely to be a grid of numbers.

The ncxr chart shows how information is arranged for the diamond crib.

Fve abbreviated this chart as well, singe rhc one you construct will depend on rhe particular card order you use. The main function of the Master Chart is m give you information to construct the crib sheets.

The crib lists the thirteen decks on die top axis and die ace through king on the vertical axis. Lets see how it works.

Diamonds

♦13

♦l

#2

*3

#4

«

96

*?

*8

#9

#10

til

#12

A

51'1

28/25

3003

32/21

34/19 36/17

38/15

40/13

42/11

44/9

46/7

4%n

50/3

2

3

• . r

. • •

.. ■

...

...

• . .

...

...

...

...

. •«

4

...

...

...

...

a • •

...

...

...

. . i

...

...

...

5

...

• • •

. •.

...

• . »

...

. * .

...

...

...

• . «

• •.

...

6

41/12

43/10

47/6

49

51/2

27/26

29/24

31/22 33/20

35/18

37'16

39/14

7

...

...

. . .-

...

•..

...

...

...

... i ...

...

...

...

s

9

id

imk

1/52 3/50

j/48

7/46 ; 5/44

11'42

13/40

IV»

17/36

19/34

21/32

23/30

Queer.

...

• . .

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...King

...

...

. ..

... | ...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

»13

#1

n

04 [ *5

"6

#7

n

#10

#11

#12

Assume the sdccrcd card is the ¡ack of diamqnds and the number callcd is fifteen. Find die jack on rhc diamond crib and read across until you come to fifteen. This appears in Dcck Eight. The jack of diamonds, then is fifteenth from thç top in Dcck Eight. " .

What if number sixteen is allied? In this case you would use Dcck Nine.-The jack of diamonds in this-deck is seventeenth from the top. The solution i.s to deal sixteen cards down and turn over die next one. This looks fair.

What if number forty-eight is called? Our crib shows that the jack of diamonds can be found at forty-eighth position from the face (live from the top} in Deck Three. Here you would instruct die spectator to deal the cards face up.

A quick look is ail that's needed to find the deck that will produce any freely callcd card at any freely callcd number.

1 did mention rhat there were two exceptions diat cannot be handled with this thirteen-deck system. Those exceptions are the twenty-sixth position for any cards lying at odd positions in Set A and die tweiky-scventh position for any cards lying at even positions in Set B. Since diese card-position combinations represent a veiy small portion of (he more dian 2500 combinations possible, die likelihood of them being called is slight. If eidier twenty-six or twenty-seven is chosen, I deal with the problem by saying. 'Sony, Icayit work with that number. Give me anollyer me. either higher or !vuer. '"Other more devious ploys can be exercised in these rare instances, if you prefer them.

PiilUORMANCF. POSSIBTIJTIES: Given this powerful solution—or so it seems to me—the question is how to use this technology?

("Her the last five years, I have developed several options. Here are two ot mv fevnrites. »

1) The Body badApproach: Have twelve decks hidden on your body. fTiis amounts to two decks in each of six Dockets. 'Hie thirteenth deck is displayed from the start. You then switch decks, if required, so that the visible deck is secretly exchanged tor the required one.

2) The Sealed Box Approach: H and out a sealed s hoe box. Identity the appropriate deck, then, secretly, through a trap door, introduce it to the supposedly sealed container. Using this method» the thirteen decks can be hidden on the table, behind other props., or in your attaché case, 1 use a CD box to hold rhc decks in order.

The reader may choose to develop one of these approaches, or to pursue another using this thirteen-dcck system. Good Luck!

0 0

Post a comment