Open Prediction

Flash Cards Smooth Openers Magical Apparatus

This idea was inspired by Ross Bertram's loading technique as used in his card-to-wallet effect called The Pay Off and published in The Gen Volume 21, Number 7 (November - 1965). Marlo's adaptations and handlings are applied to several things. In this instance, we refer the reader to the theme of a signed card to card case. The loading of a card or cards into a closed card case has many uses, but for the moment consider only the following The pack is removed from a card case. The card case is...

Covering The Top Card Pass

Card Pass Opening

The notion of using a top card or block of cards to conceal the pass-action is ascribed to Ellis Stanyon however, Marlo was the first to painstakingly analyze its dynamics and submit expert technical variations. These notes appeared in the Linking Ring, The New Tops, Expert Card Conjuring, and the Hierophant. The most thorough treatment of the Stanyon Pass is explained in Marlo's Magazine - Volume 2 (1977). Not much can be added to these notes, but Roy Walton and Ken Krenzel have described the...

Convincing Control

This technique is an easy, convincing method for controlling a selected card to the bottom of the deck. It is a technical variation of a bottom control that appeared in The New Tops (June - 1966) in the article titled, The Prayer Cull. It also uses some basic ideas from The Moveable Card Pass. Method Spread the deck and have a card selected. Square the cards, then re-spread them so that your right hand will have a spread of cards as they are separated for the return of the selection. The...

Jon Racherbaumer

There is nothing new as far as its underlying concept or mechanics are concerned, but this technique is interesting because of its novel context. Specifically, the If Glimpse is a detailed item that should be attached to Edward Marlo's innovative Incomplete Faro Control. Its uses are manifold. For example, it can be used to deceive cardmen familiar with Incomplete Faro Control techniques and can be used to secretly glimpse a known key at the twenty-sixth or twenty-seventh positions. Its...

Roy Walton

This is the second variation of Hideo Kato's excellent Where Has It Gone originally published in the Genii (September-1969). This variation of Mr. Kato's trick produces a slightly different effect, although basically a card vanishes and reappears. The interesting feature is that the card vanishes without any cutting of the group, then reappears at any position in the group nominated by a spectator.74 This also happens without any cutting. In addition, the alternating face-up and face-down cards...

Charles M Hudson

These are minor variations and additions to Marlo's The Original R or B Phantom. 63 Since Hudson liked to use a 53-card deck (Joker included) whenever possible, for reasons he stated many times in his The Card Corner, he was first interested in the correct placing of the odd-colored card in a 53-card pack. It turns out that the card has to be placed 14th from the bottom after the initial Overhand Shuffle instead of 13th as in Marlo's routine. Then, according to Hudson, if two Faro shuffles, an...

Dialogue With Merritt

Wilson Merit is a friend, philosopher, mathematician, and non-performing magician, yet he happens to be an inveterate reader of magic books and magazines. In fact, anything pertaining to mystery, scrutable and inscrutable, interests Merit. Occasionally, we spend time together discussing books, trying not to mince our words or to contain our ideas and impressions. A few months ago, using both tape recorders and literary license, the Hierophant decided to record portions of these dialogues. We...

Brother John Hamman

This effect is Hamman's treatment of Touch Turn or Twisting The Aces to use the popular title . Its exact date of origin is unknown, although it appears to have been developed around 1965-66.75 A characteristic Hamman kicker evokes a strong reaction because it surprises the audience. Whether or not it ultimately puzzles them is another question. Purists will debate the issue, so you will find an addition at the end of Hamman's routine. Take it or leave it. Effect The performer shows the Ace,...

Joe Destefano

Thematically speaking, this short routine will remind you of Vernon's Twisting The Aces and Marlo's Somersaulting A-2-3. Effect The Ace, Deuce, and Three of Diamonds are shown and held face down. When they are spread, the Deuce in the middle is face up. Next, the Ace is placed in the center and it also turns face up. This magical action is repeated with the Three. Finally, all three cards are placed face down in the middle of the deck. When the deck is ribbon-spread face down, the Ace, Deuce,...

Darting Double

The bold practice of tossing a Double Card onto the table as a single card was first proposed by Edward Marlo in 1947 when he published Marlo's Two Card Throw in Marlo In Spades. Crediting Marlo as a source of inspiration, Howie Schwarzman recorded The Impeccable Double in Professional Card Magic (1961). This was also a toss-type technique. In Ibidem 26 (September-1962), Marlo released his shooting version in an article titled How I Recall Recently C.F. James published a one-hand dealing...

Marnase Change And Vanish

The two-handed transformation from The Expert At The Card Table is a remarkable and enduring bit of manipulation. The following mechanics are based on the Second Transformation and is used to change or vanish the principal card being shown and handled. Hold the deck in a face-down dealing position. Turn the top card face up and replace it in an outjogged position for half its length. Hold your right hand perfectly flat and cover the deck. (Fig. 7) The fleshy base of your right palm contacts the...

Edward Marlo

In Expert Card Technique (1946) there is a routine called Rub-a-Dub-Dub where a card changes and eventually vanishes. The magician seems to rub a single card on the table with the flat palm of his hand to produce each transformation. The original technique required a fake pick-off from the deck, plus superb timing and bold address. The following version is more deliberate and subtle. The principal card is actually taken and not re-stolen on the deck. It is then apparently rubbed against the...

An Open Letter To Nick Trost

Our introduction was wholly inadequate, necessarily onesided, and not reciprocal through the printed page. I discovered your column in The New Tops a number of years, a Linking Ring Parade, a few articles, and an occasional book of yours. The material appealed to me. In those days, I was a rank beginner, just learning, and any information was eagerly greeted. Your style and approaches also had the ease and clarity of another compeer Al Leech. Therefore, Mr....

Robert Walker

This method was inspired by Overturning Touch Turn, by Larry Jennings. Students will recognize a complete Crux Phase, plus a more logical, congruent action procedure. The Crux Phase or twist-sequence follows the same maneuvers used by Marlo and Sam Schwartz in their respective routines Coefficient of Friction and Back-Flip. The set of gimmicked cards is identical to the Jennings' set and follows his plot, including the extra card business and surprise 4-for-4 change at the climax. Set-up...

Bruce Cervon Dai Vernon

This original combination of principles was shown by Bruce Cervon in the Spring of 1970. It was one of the items Cervon showed on his lecture tour to puzzle cardmen. He called it the Viet Nam Trick because its basic workings was sent to Vernon by a soldier serving in Viet Nam. Vernon and Cervon worked out different procedures and handlings. 83 82 Ackerman originally called this effect the Changing Card. The alliterative title was my idea. As for the effect itself, Ackerman has been performing...

Horse Of A Different Color

In the red deck, the 2H from the blue deck has been placed fairly near the bottom. A little further up in the deck, not together, are the QC and QS. Turn the red deck face up and start spreading it. You first come upon the 2H. Say, 'Here is the duplicate red-backed 2H.' Without showing its back, throw it out face up on the tabled red-backed 2H, which, by the way, has been previously turned face up again.64 64 As a bit of off-hand gilding, it is possible to...

Control Fakeouts

These fake-out controls are designed to puzzle magicians, yet their manifest actions are straight-forward enough to bewilder lay audiences. Hold the deck in a left-hand dealing position for the Standard Peek. Tilt the deck upright and riffle the upper right corner with your right forefinger for the stop action. After a selection is noted, retain a left pinky break under the selection and riffle off the rest of the cards. Cut all the cards above the break to the table, then place the remainder...

Tooperfect Theory Rick Johnsson

There was recently a great brouhaha on a national basis brought about by a statement attributed to Dai Vernon, who supposedly said something to the effect that the spectator was never or rarely was fooled by what a magician performed for him in the way of tricks. To Vernon's enemies, this was the long-awaited proof that the grand old man had lost his grip, that the old Pharaoh ( ) had shuffled off his mortal coil. Even some Vernon disciples had the impression that the Professor needed to...

Ken Krenzel

Activities For Grandparents Day

Shortly after Nick Trost's principle of a visible perpendicular Tunnel Reverse appeared in The New Phoenix 364 (December - 1961), Krenzel developed this handling which is completely baffling to lay persons and magicians.78 In Trost's description, both cards had to be set-up prior to performance. That is, both cards were presented in a protruding, perpendicular position before the effect commenced. Consequently, despite the originality of this approach, much of the magical impact was weakened or...

David L Bendix

Late one night in the American Bar in Singapore, I was sitting with Harley Pembrooke, the world-famous engineer, who is quite a card enthusiast. As we sipped our absinthe, I was holding forth more or less as follows We have heard of female chapeaugraphy artists and of women who performed illusions, manipulated coins, and the like, but why are there no female card performers Pembrooke smiled and said, They may be rare, old man, but hardly nonexistent. He then proceeded to relate the following...

Dingles Collectors Derek Dingle

Derek Dingle first became interested in the Collectors as a card problem during the summer of 1970, after seeing versions at the Milwaukee Convention. Since then he has worked out many variations and methods. This routine is an example of his experimentation.46 Method Take the deck and remove the four Aces, placing them face down onto the table or close-up pad. They are placed in the angled position, which will make a subsequent pick-up easier and trouble-free. (Fig. 1) Three selections are...

Sandwich Approach

Sandwich effects were popular in the 60's and 70's and Marlo accumulated and scribbled many notes exploring sandwich possibilities. Some were quite different from approaches usual taken. This article consists of stylized versions of the R. W. Hull mental effect where a single card is tabled prior to the mental selection of a card. The magician then removes another single card, usually the Ace of Spades, and uses it as an influence-card (magnetic or otherwise). The previously tabled card is...

Marlo Opener Magic

When we first read The Three of Clubs trick in the Card Clairvoyance section of Greater Magic, we were struck by an odd fact astute observers are puzzled after the climax. In other words, the Mexican Turnover technique is one of the poorest to apply to this kind of effect, but because of the duplicate card and the double-lift, the spectator, suspecting a switch, is puzzled by the fact that the performer still holds a 3C in his hand. It becomes a sucker effect because the spectator thinks he was...

On The Charlier Pass

From the spectator's view, this action is still hidden by your right hand. (Fig. E) As the halves transpose, it is important that the cards are allowed to settle or drop down into your left hand. This enables your right hand to easily move in, grasping the deck from above by the ends with your right first finger curled on top. (Fig.F ) At this stage, notice that your left first finger is curled against the bottom of the deck. This action is carried to completion, the halves meeting flush, as...

Tilt Tip And Mock Placement

These two items may be of passing interest. When performing Tilt, many cardmen have said that lay people often think that the insertion-cards are going to the bottom of the deck, not the center. When the inserted card or cards subsequently appear on top, the spectators are still surprised. When performing Marlo's All You Have To Do Is Watch, Art Weygandt experienced the following The layman felt he knew the solution to the effect because he assumed the cards were being placed on the bottom of...

Visual Retention Change

The underlying technique is the By-Pass Technique as featured in the Marlo-Curry change ( Linking Ring - January, 1955). The approach of taking a card or cards from one hand to the hand holding the deck or a packet is interchangable as in Mechanical Seconds (M-U-M -November, 1956 and in Seconds - Centers - Bottoms (1960). While the card or cards to be taken can be turned face up, Marlo's approach was to apparently toss the taken card face down. This delays the disclosure of the change. Also the...

Breakless Curry Change

This special technique was originally slated to be in Breaking The Circle, a restricted journal catering to cardmen interested in finer points of technique, advanced handlings, approaches to effects, and those concepts that often separate advanced cardmen from consummate experts. In the last three years, this technique was demonstrated to a select few. It is now published to reveal possibilities perhaps overlooked by complacent students. Over the years, the Curry Change has been avoided by many...

Technical Variation Of The Veeser Concept

Method Suppose you have a packet of eight cards consisting of four Aces and four Kings with the Aces at the face of the packet. Hold the packet in a left-hand dealing position. Angle-jog the first seven cards at the outer left corner of the packet. The bottom or lowermost card remains where it is. These seven cards are moved over as a block, which is easily accomplished by using the left pinky Pull Down as your right hand, holding the other cards in a Biddle Grip, pivots the seven-card block to...

Onehand Bottom Deal Illusion

This One-Hand Bottom Deal approach is in the same category as the One-Hand Stud Second from Seconds-Centers-Bottoms because the top single card is openly pushed over the side of the deck and remains in this cantilevered position until it is dealt. If you use both approaches, note that they are equally deceptive and decidedly different. Marlo's One Hand Bottom Deal Illusion seems to preclude any trickery and there is a persistence of vision that makes it visually compelling. Method Be sure that...

Variant Of Hit Second Deal

This is an easy variant of the Hit Second Deal (First Method) explained in Seconds - Centers -Bottoms, p. 60. While its application is not as flexible as the original, it has its own moments and uses, especially when the top card is turned face up, then face down, and apparently dealt face down to the table. In this sequence, the second card is actually dealt). At times, it is also an excellent Double Lift Substitute. Method Hold the deck as for dealing. Your left thumb pushes over two cards,...

Crack Card Switches

This is based on a packet switch that was originally done with a Stripper deck. These techniques use a regular deck. Method The top three cards of the deck are secretly injogged. Your right hand holds four Aces fanned and face down. The injogged cards can be overlapping the deck for about a quarter of an inch. In this case, the deck is tilted toward the performer. If you want to work in a finessed manner, the cards can be injogged for only the width of their white borders, allowing you to hold...

Si Stebbins On The Road

To fully understand these procedures, you must understand Second and Third Methods of The Chicago Miracle. We purposely preceded this article with these methods, hoping that the student will learn it. If not, please review the methods prior to studying this treatment. You have several roads or options, each leading to a different ending. In essence, several different effects are possible. The spectator cuts the deck, then cuts off a small packet which he places on the table or in his pocket....

Sid Marshall

First explained by Edward Marlo in Phoenix 329 (1955) and later in Faro Notes as the Second Fooler. Effect A card is selected in a very fair manner. The deck is openly assembled and given a shuffle. A small dagger is quickly inserted into the deck, finding the selected card. Requirements Using Will De Seive's method, prepare a key card by using a coin to make an indentation-hump in the center of a Court card. Place a quarter or half dollar on the back of the card so that the convex hump is on...

Open Predicition Edward Marlo

In August, 1965, Larry Jennings refocused attention on Martin Gardner's approach to the Lie Speller. His method, thanks to Ron Wilson, was introduced to England and the Avis-Haxton-Elmsley-Walton ensemble, although Walton is in Scotland. Jack Avis's version was published in the Pallbearers Review (May - 1968), which also published Bruce Cervon's Perfect Speller. The circle, if we can call it that, was complete. Other versions appeared. Bob Ostin's Fingertip Fantasies (1968) included The Lie...

All Backs Tacks

Hull was good at creating effects. Some of his methods left much to be desired. Edward Marlo wrote in The Cardician that the effect of causing a deck of cards to change to all double-backs then later to all double-face cards was first brought to the magic-world's attention by R. W. Hull, when he sold his NRA deck. Later, in the booklet, More Eye Openers (printed in 1933), he introduced his 'Magic Picture Book Deck', which was an impromptu version of the NRA deck. Here, too, the pack was...

Jules DeBarros

Effect The classic Chink-a-Chink routine where four objects mysteriously congregate. Requirements (1) Four Black checkers. (2) Two Red checkers. These are double-thickness checkers made by gluing two checkers together.(3) A jewelry box to hold the checkers. Set-up Three Blacks and one Red are kept in a container such as a jewelry box prior to the performance. An extra Red and Black checker are in the performer's lap. The Red checker should be placed on the lap or left thigh on your actual...

Albert Goshman Boob On The Tube

Brooklyn is well-known for generating yahoos and urban rustics. Living where and as they do, Brooklynites are usually blunt, straight-forward people, who are direct in their human relationships. They enjoy the nitty-gritty, generally at the expense of genteelness. Life in Brooklyn is hard, fast, and basic. Let's cut the bullshit, fella Get on with it, I ain't got all day Same to you, fella Ya, ya, ya It is part of a generic, hackneyed concept that Brooklynites have enthusiasm, boldness that...

Part Two Open Prediction

Only amateurs seem interested in card problems, especially if they feature imposing conditions and challenging requirements. Professional entertainers, on the other hand, scrupulously avoid problems. There are enough extrinsic problems to performing without manufacturing unnecessary ones. They prefer to keep in things simple and direct. Why perform tricks that require audiences to remember lots of stipulations Why make lay people, who come to be pleasantly diverted, amused, and entertained,...

Bruce Cervon

This contribution comes from Bruce Cervon's personal files, dated December 29, 1965. This falls under the gambling-demonstration category and can be used as an opener or interlude, depending on how effectively the operator can execute a deck switch. If you have seen Cervon work or have read Gene Shelley's re-print. of Russduck's The Cardiste, will remember his procedure on Perpetual Motion Poker. Items of the genre, often ignored because of the preparation or dependence on stacks, evoke...

The Unwritten Prediction

Effect The spectator deals the cards face up. Anytime he wishes, he deals a card face down. This card proves to be the only odd-back card in the entire deck. Its duplicate is shown to be reversed in another deck. 26 With the spectator doing all the dealing, this effect seems to have only two possible solutions (1) A deck switch. (2) Use of psychology. The following method employs a psychological approach. Set-up Assuming you use a Blue Deck, remove a card likely to be named, the AS, KH, or JD,...

Outfaro Infaro Program Playing Cards

Effect A mentally selected card turns out to be the only odd-backed card in the deck. The title of this effect was dubbed on April 9, 1970, but the original method was worked out in 1957. Two other cardmen worked on this effect Roy Vriesman and Harry Riser. The underlying principle of this method is the same one used by Vriesman, Riser, and Marlo however, both Vriesman and Riser had their selections made off the face of the deck, with the spectator counting down to the force-card. Marlo had the...

First Method

This method comes close to ideally satisfying the conditions of this effect. The spectator inserts the principle cards anywhere in the spread, then the performer cleanly removes the cards next to the inserted face-up cards. The face-down cards are the Queens. 87 The patter from Marlo's Blind Date can be used, but if you utilize four value-cards (each being a different number), the patter theme of Good Number should be used. See Marlo's Notes of 1949, where techniques other than the Hindu...

Method Eight

Set-up and Preparation This uses a Double-Face card. Suppose it is the JH-10S. Picture cards best camouflage the Stik-Tack disk. A Stik-Tack is placed on the center of the JH-side. This gaff is placed on the bottom of the pack, with JH-side showing at the face. A matching regular JH is placed second from the face (bottom). This set-up can be easily arranged with a borrowed deck. Method The pack is given an Overhand Shuffle, maintaining the double-face card on the bottom. The deck is handed to...

Method Nine

Ostensibly look for the openly predicted 4S. At the finish of this action, the deck is face up with a side-jogged card projecting from the right side of the deck. (Fig. 3) The 4S is also face down, about three or four cards above the side-jogged card. Your initial pushoff determines exactly how many cards above the side-jogged card lies the 4S. Pick up the tabled deck in a right-hand Biddle Grip. Your left palm is run against the left side of the deck to basically square it without disturbing...

Edward Marlo Millard Lichter

Please study the potential of this method carefully. Effect A spectator is handed a deck of cards. Another spectator names any one of the fifty-two cards. The initial spectator is instructed to deal the cards face up, stopping when he comes to the named card. He may at anytime deal a card face down as in the Open Prediction procedure. Despite the fact that the initial spectator handles all the cards, all the time, and another spectator has made the prediction, the face-down card turns out to be...

By Clarence Irving Gaff F F D L C D

Gaff, bibliophile, magicphile, and womanizer will answer your magical questions by hook or crook. Whatever obscure query pops into your head should be addressed to him. He asks merely that you restrict yourself to the irrelevant. As you know, these columns are written some time before you receive the magazine. For example, yesterday was election day. By the time you read this, the fact that FDR made it for a second term will hardly be earth-shaking however, everyone is talking about it now....

Simon Aronson

This method and presentation should find unanimous favor among readers. With the exception of a simple sleight in the Lead-in Routine, which can be deleted if the performer wishes, the whole presentation is sleight-less. Since the performer can begin with a Si Stebbins set-up and finish with the deck in Red-Black deck order, the presentation possibilities are wide open. Its strongest aspect is the Prediction Climax, which adds a new dimension to the premise and provides the imaginative worker...

Roland Hurley

Roland Hurley developed this version of the standard Boston Box in 1969. During the last decade, beginning with Swadling's Swindle, many innovations using magnets in conjunction with coins and coin boxes have been created. Ken Brooke, Johnson Products (Jo-Pro Box and the Magna Coin Box), and Sam Schwartz (The Incredi-Box) have made excellent contributions along these lines. Magicians like Rink and Eddy Teytelbaum have experimented in this area and Alex Elmsley showed Marlo a magnetic coin-box...

Gene Nielsen

Effect Same as Spectator's Open Prediction. A spectator names any card. The deck is handed to another spectator who deals it face up and one at a time until he comes to the first spectator's card. He may deal one card face down at any time, as per the standard Open Prediction procedure. The face-down card turns out to be the card called out by the first spectator. Method The same basic principle of psychologically forcing the fifteenth card from the top is used however, any card called can be...

Third Method

Have the spectator cut off a small packet of cards and place them into his pocket. While he does this, your back is turned. When you turn around, pick up the deck for a Faro Shuffle. During this action, your right thumb slightly pulls back the top card at its outer right corner to glimpse the top card. Suppose it is the 9S. For the time being, remember this card. Split the deck so that the slightly larger portion is cut off the top by your right hand. Perform an Out Faro from the bottom,...

The Prediction Climax

If the 26-card stack was generated from the Si Stebbins set-up, an additional climax can be performed where you can apparently predict the freely chosen card. This is possible because the card which is turned over in spelling the color indicate selection, thus gives you plenty of time to use an index, nail writer, or other means to supply the prediction. Briefly, using a scale of one to thirteen, (J ll, Q 12, K 13) If the color spelled was red, the selected card will be the same suit as the...

LeadIn Routine

This foregoing effect could be done by simply introducing the deck already stacked, but Aronson felt the need to have a procedure for setting-up the stack in the course of a routine, making it unnecessary to bring in a new deck. Consequently, he developed the following effect to bring a deck into the Lie Detector Stack. It is a fairly strong effect on its own merit. The deck starts out in Si Stebbins order. Invite two spectators to sit beside you. Say, Mr. A, please give the deck a cut. Fine....

Robert Walker Dave Solomon

Most sandwich effects are glorified locations, changes, or transpositions. This approach adds a redeeming element of surprise, rescuing an apparent location from being another dull puzzlement. Cardmen have recently tried to create surprise climaxes. They make the trapped card change or reveal different colored backs. Sometimes the cards become blank. Robert Walker's approach is different, incorporating the notion of magician's failure as per the Dunbury Delusion. The result is dramatic. Walker...

Reinhard Muller Alex Elmsley

Effect Two Black Queens are shown and placed face up on the table. A spectator freely selects a card. The deck is squared and both Queens are fairly placed face up on top of the deck. The spectator gives the deck a single cut. The cards are spread by either the spectator or the performer and the selection is found face down between the two face-up Queens. Method Openly remove the two Black Queens. Hold them face up in your right hand and obtain a left pinky break under the top card of the deck...

Allan Ackerman

Effect A single card changes into three different selections, then finally disappears.82 Method Three cards are selected and controlled to the bottom. They should be in order, but it makes no difference if the order is 1-2-3 or 3-2-1. Any Faro control is excellent or look up Marlo's Streamlined Lessinout Stack. Ask the spectator to cut off about half the deck, placing the top half aside and out of the way. Pick up the bottom half and shuffle or cut the bottom card to the top, leaving the other...

Eugene Castillon

After showing Eugene Castillon my Olram Aces routine, he worked out his own combination. His intention was to create a viable variation with its own visually strong points. When you go gaff a certain price is paid. The following version justifies the cost. Requirements (1) A regular deck (2) Three gaffed cards. Gaff A is an AC with a 10D index. Gaff B is a 3S with an AH index. (These are Hamman-type gaffs.) Gaff C is a Marlo Longitudinal-Split back with one side showing the 5H. Gaff C is also a...

Card Tricks Using Tilt

Marlo not only displeased himself, but realized that he could not please everybody. He thought that All You Have To Do Is Watch was a superior version, but some magicians objected that the last Deuce was inessential or extraneous to the effect. That is, it was not part of the multiple sandwich at the climax. This method, which is described as briefly as possible, will probably dissatisfy the same magicians.47 You should by now be familiar with standard Addition Moves and Marlo's Atfus Move In...

Marlos Initial Collectors

Deck, squeezed by your left thumb, and are immediately spread to reveal three face-down cards interlaced between them They are the selections Method The four Aces are culled from the pack and are tossed face up onto the table. The pack is tabled as the spectator is asked to shuffle the cards. The performer takes the shuffled deck. A card is selected and controlled to the top. Because of its expediency, deceptiveness, and the nature of the subsequent handling, we prefer to have the selection...

Hideo Kato Jon Racherbaumer

Effect The spectator freely cuts to a card which he inserts into the center of a packet behind his back. While this packet is still out of sight behind his back, it is inserted into a card case and closed. The performer has not touched the cards during this procedure. Despite these stringent conditions, the performer mentally divines the selection, which somehow magically reverses itself in the deck while still in the card case. No, the magician does not take the case and cards from the...

Paul Swinford

The original effect is in Roy Walton's book, The Devil's Playthings, p. 14. The reverse Faro may strike many spectators as being a deliberate sorting process rather than a mixing or shuffling of the cards. This replaces the reverse Faro Shuffles of Walton's approach with forward Faro shuffles. A few other minor changes are also included. Method Offer the pack to the spectator to shuffle and cut. Have him remove five cards, turning them face up on the table. If any duplicate denominations occur,...

Part Nine Killer Apps

Ace-Cutting Without Double-Cutting Black Aces - Red Kings Four Ace Stop Almost Like Trick Cards This Is A Four-King Trick Jump-Jump Aces Castillon-Olram Aces Nomad Aces Ad-Jacent The Stabbing Myth Sid's Super Stab Over Here, Of Course Fly Me To The Moon Gone To Earth Swinford On Over Here, Of Course Hamman Twist Twist Again Tickfaw Twist Wheeling Three Notes On The Lie-Speller Unknown Speller Lie-Detector Speller Liar's Fortune Sober Slop Shuffle Dealing The Flush Additions To Marlo's Matching...

Chinese Enigma Roland Hurley

It takes taste to account for taste. - Spanish proverb Crude props will prejudice an audience against an act. On the other hand, attractive, well-finished apparatus often makes an audience consider the performance better than it really is. - Henning Nelms Roland Hurley is creatively introverted and makes magical props and gimmicks for himself and a few friends. He reflects the rare spirit of the guildsman, infusing himself into his productions, striving for perfectibility, and taking pride in...

Steve Freeman

The inspiration for this effect comes from an item published by Arthur Hastings in Ibidem 12. Method In the process of removing the four Aces, the two red Kings are brought to the top. The Aces are removed and placed on the table in the CHSD order, from the top. The remainder of the deck is held face down in the left hand. In squaring the cards, a left pinky break is obtained under the top two cards. The right hand picks up the Ace-packet and flips it face up onto the deck. Fan or spread the...

Turn Around Center Glimpse Edward Marlo

Objective To glimpse a card that is in the center of the deck after a spectator peeks at a card. This action is similar to the Turnaround Glimpse cited in Chapter Eleven of Marlo's The Multiple Shift. Here the card peeked by the spectator, remains in the center, and is glimpsed in situ. The deck is held for the usual Spectator Peek. A card is peeked as the performer holds a break below the selection with the tip of the left little finger. Your right hand comes over the deck with the right first...

Second Method

Previously reverse an indifferent card second from the face of the deck. This can be done secretly as the red Kings are culled. Have a card selected via a Peek, timing your riffle so that the peeked selection is somewhere in the center. Release the peeked card to the lower portion and retain a left pinky break above the card. Double-Cut the cards to the break. This brings the selection to the top while simultaneously bringing the reversed indifferent card to the center. As your right hand...

Whos Hockley Edward Marlo

This was inspired by Hockley's Prediction (John Derris) that was published in the Ireland Magic 1957 Card Annual, pp. 34-36, Volume Two. It should remind you of Paul Curry's Open Prediction. Marlo's methods eliminate the need for a Double or Triple Lift and picking up the tabled packet and unnecessarily changing of hands. Have the deck shuffled by the spectator. As he returns the pack, note the bottom card. Hold the deck face down in the left hand and get a break on the bottom card. Hold this...

Action Lift For The Open Prediction

This technique is not a lift at all, but is a fluent way of dealing two or three cards as one. Since the Repeat Open Prediction requires a three-as-one deal, this is an explanation of the action The three cards to be dealt are on the bottom of the deck as the deck is face up. We are at the stage in the procedure where a portion of the deck has been dealt face up and a card has been dealt face down by the spectator. The performer takes the talon and places it face down in his left hand. As you...

Dove Droppings From All Over

Wurstburger Hoffbrau announces the opening of his new musical, More Later, based on the life of Angelo Lewis. Rumor has it that The Amazing Randi has signed for the film biography of Tony Curtis. Benjamin J. Kleinman has just flown in from Tangyanika to announce his latest publishing venture, A Key to the Hiemphant. When asked to elaborate, Mr. Kleinman said, Many persons I've conversed with and I might add, from all over the world, have been unable to understand what Mr. Racherbaurner is...

Coin Concatenation Larry Austin

This routine is a combination of three coin effects (1) a penetration (2) a unique appearance which can be repeated ad infinitum (3) a final disappearance. The heart of the routine is the mysterious appearance of a coin in a handkerchief, using a move attributed to Jimmy Hume. (Austin was shown the move by Rick Johnsson.)40 We saw Larry perform this routine at the 1970 Southeastern Convention. He not only puzzled everyone, but Paul Diamond, weighed down with his gaffed coins, was convinced that...

Marlos Original Solution To The Open Prediction

It is philosophically handy to say that finding Truth is merely discovering the Obvious. Often times in finding a solution to a magical effect, the obvious becomes somewhat elusive because what is manifestly apparent seldom seems very subtle or clever. The obvious solution is also (in most cases) the shortest distance between the concept of the effect and its accomplishment, hence the most direct and least devious route. Marlo's original solution, conceived at Colon, Michigan in 1949, has shall...

Jonathan Dunbury

Those missing the excellent epigraph at the beginning of Hierophant 4 missed an important point. It bears repeating Magic is not a timid and stuttering form of science, but a metaphorical expression of it. In magic today we have ignoramuses attempting to modernize the way effects are presented. They concentrate on the visible props and tend to minimize the invisible process of the effect itself. A depressing example of this tendency was recently featured in M-U-M. Some well-meaning dolt...

Ed Marlo Cased In Vanish

Effect A deck of cards vanishes from a card case. This method is simple enough and can be prepared on the spot with a borrowed deck and case. This puts it in the impromptu class. Preparation Suppose you have the deck in its card case. Begin by opening the flap. Next tear off the small side taps and discard them. Hold the card case by its sides with your left hand, its flap facing you. Your right fingers and thumb then insert the tongue of the flap behind the cards. Fig. 1 Force the top flap...

Professors Incubus Roger Sylwester

Limitation is a stimulus to invention in creation. However, when limiting ourselves we must know when and where to do so. Limiting ourselves to subjective taste with arbitrary interpretations or 'free' expressions is beginning at the end. Nature reveals that limitation lies at the beginning, in its objective laws or its methods. With these limited universal laws it arrives in the end at multivarious or unlimited particular forms. - Joost Baljeu, from Attempt at a Theory of Synthesist Plastic...

Ernie Heldman

The usual apology applies Since Out of this World is a marketed effect, even though it has been exposed and abused into near oblivion. It has achieved the sad distinction of becoming a classic tavern trick performed and known by most of the habitu s. However, we will not divulge its underlying secret. The aspect that concerns us is the clean-up when the only dirty work takes place. This clean-up is characteristic of Heldman's style, which can be described as hard-nosed and commercial. Heldman...

Moving Monte Switch

Allan Ackerman contributed this technique in 1970. It was also performed by Chuck Smith and recorded on film. The move made a ghostly passage through the underground in the 70's, but few cardmen actually mastered or utilized it. One exception was Brick Tilley, who studied the film and figured out its probable handling. In turn, he performed the technique on his own film titled Watch Out, Cleveland Because this technique has been kicked around and possibly claimed by others, this description...

Convincing Tilt

Daryl, if pressed, does the Real Work. The rest of the time he glibly and felicitously entertains audiences. Proximity is no problem. Nose to nose or from afar, he moves with equal grace and seems to have fun when he is funning and fooling. This is important. During a stay in New Orleans, he showed me a nice touch for performing Tilt. It requires practice, but once mastered, it is the kind of finesse that separates real workers from real work. Method As your right hand shows a single card, your...