Mouth Patterns

Reframing and Outframing a Thought Virus Using Sleight of Mouth

Sleight Mouth

Once we are familiar with the system of beliefs that is holding a potential 'thought virus' in place, for instance, we are better able to find effective reframes which will help to place the limiting belief back into an outcome frame and feedback frame. The various Sleight of Mouth patterns can help us to approach the limiting system of beliefs in a more strategic (rather than reactionary) manner. Let's consider how we can use the formalization of the Sleight of Mouth patterns as a way to more...

Thought Viruses

Thought Virus

Limiting beliefs arise from generalizations, deletions and distortions that have become placed in a 'problem frame', 'failure frame', or 'impossibility frame'. Such beliefs become even more limiting and difficult to change when they are separated from the experiences, values, internal states and expectations from which they were derived. When this happens, the belief can become perceived as some type of disassociated truth about reality. This leads people to begin to view the belief as the...

Definitions and Examples of Sleight of Mouth Patterns

In the course of this book we have explored a number of specific Sleight of Mouth patterns, and the principles and methods which underlie the ability to generate and use them. The purpose of this chapter is to summarize them as a system of distinctions which can be used, in either conversation, consultation, or debate, to help people become more 'open to doubt' limiting beliefs, and more 'open to believe' empowering and useful beliefs. There are fourteen distinct Sleight of Mouth patterns which...

Using of Sleight of Mouth as a System of Patterns

Thus far in this book, we have explored how individual Sleight of Mouth patterns may be applied in order to help people become more 'open to doubt' limiting beliefs and generalizations, and to become more 'open to believe' empowering beliefs and generalizations. Often, a simple Sleight of Mouth statement can make a big difference in helping to shift a person's attitude and responses. Consider the example of the woman who had just received news that she had an unusual form of cancer, and that,...

Creating and Maintaining a Thought Virus Using Sleight of Mouth

This type of dialog between Bandler and the audience went on for quite some time, with no progress. It was clear that Bandler's primary intention for the demonstration was to maintain the problem frame, at all costs. His responses were not really about the content of the belief he had chosen. He successfully 'outframed' every intervention that people proposed as an attempt to help him find some solution. As long as Bandler was able to control the frame, he was able to determine the outcome of...

The Belief Change Cycle Procedure

Belief Cycle

The following procedure is a technique that 1 developed whose purpose is to help lead people through the natural cycle of belief change. It involves the use of anchoring and inner mentors to help lead people through the sequence of states making up the belief change cycle 1) wanting to believe, 2) becoming open to believe, 3) believing, 4) becoming open to doubt, 5) the experience of remembering something one used to believe, and 6) trust. The procedure involves establishing separate locations...

The Magic of Language

Sleight of Mouth has to do with the magic of words and language. Language is one of the key components from which we build our mental models of the world, and can have a tremendous influence on how we perceive and respond to reality. Verbal language is a characteristic that is unique to the human race, and is considered to be one of the major factors that distinguishes humans from other creatures. The great psychiatrist Sigmund Freud, for example, believed that words were the basic instrument...

Chunking Up

The Sleight of Mouth pattern of chunking up involves generalizing an element of a statement or judgment to a larger classification, creating a new or enriched perception of the generalization being expressed. Learning, for example, is a member of a larger class of processes which may be referred to as various forms of adaptation which also includes processes such as conditioning, instinct, evolution, etc. If a person has been termed learning disabled, does that mean that the person is also to...

The Influence of Non Verbal Communication

The impact of shifting internal states and using spatial anchoring on belief change also brings up the importance of non verbal communication. Verbal messages, or words, are only one of the modalities through which people communicate and influence one another. There are many ways in which people interact and send messages non-verbally, such as making eye contact, nodding their heads, crying, pointing or emphasizing something through voice stress. A person's non-verbal communication is as...

Using Counter Examples to Reevaluate Limiting Beliefs

The Values Audit and Belief Audit apply principles of NLP and Sleight of Mouth in order to help us become more open to believe in our goals, our values, our capabilities and ourselves. They are simple but powerful processes that help us to establish new and empowering beliefs. There are times, however, where we may encounter interference from limiting beliefs. In such situations, it is also important to have tools to help us become open to doubt those generalizations or judgments that limit us....

Beliefs and Belief Systems

In addition to values and criteria, one of the most fundamental ways that we frame our experience and give it meaning is through our beliefs. Beliefs are another one of the key components of our 'deep structure'. They shape and create the 'surface structures' of our thoughts, words and actions in many ways. Beliefs determine how events are given meaning, and are at the core of motivation and culture. Our beliefs and values provide the reinforcement (motivation and permission) that supports or...

Values and Motivation

According to Webster's Dictionary, values are principles, qualities or entities that are intrinsically valuable or desirable. The term value originally meant the worth of something, chiefly in the economic sense of exchange value. The use of the term was broadened to include a more philosophic interpretation during the 19th century under the influence of thinkers and philosophers such as Friedrich Nietzsche. These philosophers coined the term axiology (from the Greek axios, meaning worthy ) to...

The Sleight of Mouth Patterns of Intention and Redefining

Identifying and acknowledging the positive intention of the critic, and turning the criticism into a how question, is an example of a type of 'verbal magic trick', using Sleight of Mouth to shift attention from a problem frame or failure frame to an outcome frame and feedback frame. It results in the transformation of a critic from a spoiler to an advisor. The process is based upon two fundamental forms of reframing that are at the core of the Sleight of Mouth patterns Intention and Redefining....

The Belief Change Cycle

The natural cycle of belief change can be likened to the changing of the seasons. A new belief is like a seed that becomes planted in the Spring. The seed grows into the Summer where it matures, becomes strong and takes root. During the process of its growth, the seed must at times compete for survival with other plants or weeds that may already be growing in the garden. To successfully accomplish this, the new seed may require the assistance of the gardener in order to help fertilize it or...

Expectations and the Sleight of Mouth Pattern of Consequences

The Sleight of Mouth pattern of Consequence uses expectations to either reinforce or challenge generalizations and beliefs. The pattern involves directing attention to a potential effect (positive or negative) resulting from a belief or the generalization defined by the belief. Anticipated positive consequences will strengthen and reinforce beliefs and judgments - even if the judgment itself is negative or limiting (an application of the principle that 'the ends justify the means'). How many...

Belief Audit

The auditing process, using linguistic connectives, can be applied to strengthen other beliefs as well, by establishing beliefs about beliefs. These can serve as additional justifications and support to have confidence in a particular belief. As an example, let's say a person has doubts about whether he or she deserves to be healthy and attractive. Applying the Belief Audit process would involve repeating this belief and adding different connectives to the end of the statement. Filling in the...

Some Verbal Frames for Eliciting Limiting Belief Statements

In order to practice finding counter examples for limiting beliefs, you will need some examples of limiting beliefs. We can utilize verbal prompts, similar to those applied in the Values Audit and Belief Audit, in order to generate limiting belief statements. As with all beliefs, and the verbalization of beliefs, limiting beliefs typically take the form of cause-effect and complex equivalence statements. That is, we believe that something is the result or consequence of something else, or that...

Shifting Outcomes

It has been pointed out that purpose directs activity. Thus, a particular outcome itself sets a type of frame that determines what is perceived as relevant, successful and inside the frame and what is considered not relevant, unhelpful and outside the frame. In a brainstorming session, for instance, the outcome is to come up with new and unique ideas. Making unusual analogies, telling outrageous jokes, asking silly questions, and being a bit bizarre, would all be relevant and helpful activities...

Changing Frame Size

The Sleight of Mouth pattern of Change Frame Size applies this principle directly to our perceptions of some situation or experience. The pattern involves re-evaluating (or reinforcing) the implication of a particular action, generalization or judgment in the context of a longer (or shorter) time frame, a larger number of people (or from an individual point of view) or a bigger or smaller perspective. An event that seems unbearably painful when we consider it with respect to our own desires and...

Context Reframing

Context reframing has to do with the fact that a particular experience, behavior or event will have different implications and consequences depending on the context in which it occurs. Rain, for example, will be perceived as an extremely positive event to a group of people who have been suffering from a severe drought, but as a negative event for a group of people who are in the midst of a flood, or who have planned an outdoor wedding. The rain itself is neither good nor bad. The judgment...

Basic Belief Chaining Procedure

The establishment of the sequence of states in a chain, and the linking of one state to another is most easily done through the process of anchoring. Historically, the NLP technique of Chaining Anchors has used kinesthetic anchoring. One way of creating a belief chain is to add linguistic-distinctions, such as Sleight of Mouth patterns, to the sequence of kinesthetic anchors. As an example, to work with a limiting belief, you can lay out four spaces to form a 'chain' going from the Problem...

Using the As If Frame to Strengthen Beliefs and Expectations

The 'as if' frame is a process by which an individual or group acts 'as if' the desired goal or outcome has already been achieved, or by which an individual or a group pretends to be some other person or entity. The 'as if frame is a powerful way to help people identify and enrich their perception of the world, and or their future desired states. It is also a useful way to help people overcome resistances and limitations within their current map of the world. The 'as if' frame is often used to...

Chunking Down to Define Criterial Equivalences

Criterial equivalence is the term used in NLP to describe the specific and observable evidences that people use to define whether or not a particular criterion has been met. Criteria are related to goals and values. Criterial equivalences are related to the experiences and rules people use to evaluate their success in achieving particular criteria. Criteria and values are usually very general, abstract and ambiguous. They can take many shapes and forms. Criterial equivalences are the specific...