What the audience sees

A person from the audicnce is taught the inner secrets of mind reading and then successfully reads the thoughts of three people from the audience.

Background and Philosophy

This is my favorite demonstration. It makes an audience member the star. And it truly stuns people. It's bold, but also relatively easy to perform There are multiple moments of amazement. And there is ample opportunity for humor.

J'Uis demonstration ;s a strong entertainment piece. Success depends or how enthusiastically it is presented, not on difficult moves or memory.

And tins the first time it is appearing in print.

The origin of this demonstration can be traced back to ideas in a Linking Ring Parade (November 1987, pages Si and 82) by Dan Huffman. In his ".Sins of Omission" the mcntalist relies upon pre-show work and double-speak lo identify- the contents of three envelopes he never touched.

In this demonstration, 1 feed the pre-show information 1 gathered to an audience member during the demonstration. The person becomes an "instant co-conspirator" (rather than instant stooge) during the demonstration.

In addition, one of the revelations from this demonstration is used in my closing demonstration, "Final Forecast."

Methods

Before the show starts. 1 gather the information I need tor this demonstration. My approach is covered in Chapter f our, on pre-show wurk.

One important secret I didn't mention earlier: When asking the person to draw a design before the show. I quickly draw a circle on the lop piece of paper, and say. "Please draw your design inside this area." This controls where the design will be drawn on the paper. It also creates a design within a design.

I also switch ink colors. Thai is. 1 use blue ink ballpoint to prepare the three sheets of paper (prior to my pre-show work). When I'm explaining my instructions (during my pre-show work). 1 use black ink ballpoint to draw the circle. The same black ballpoint is given io the person to L*e. I bis creates the impression that the person drew two designs with the black ballpoint before the show.

Lei's say the person drew a star (inside my circle), selected die number S3. and wrote the word "Future."

I invisibly communicate this pre-.show information to :he person who helps inc during my act. My method uses the drawing pad that the audience has seen me use earlier (in "Books Galore"). Before my act, I trim the upper right-hand corners of the top seven sheets of the pad (1 hold the pad with the binding along the left edge, sec Picture R). This allows mc to turn quickly to the eighth page.

Here is my set up foi the drawing pad:

1 leave the eighth page blank. This page will be used for the design. I don't give my helper any assistance with the design. The demonstration looks more believable when my helper moks a utile uncertain. I also ieavc the ninth page blank.

1 pencil-dot the number on the tenth page. But I reverse the digits. In this example, since 83 was selected before my act, 1 pencil-dot the number 38. l'he numbers are about 10 inches tall so the final number will be visible when shown to the audience. See Picture 8.

Picture S

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I pcneil-dot the word 'Tuture" on die eleventh page, making the letleis as large as possible.

I close the pad. That's all that's necessary. Again, the trimmed comers allow me to easily locate the eighth page when needed.

Pre-Show and Materials

After my pre-show work, 1 search for a private location. I examine the information on the clipboard and make my pencil dots on the pad.

I check the lighting on stage to make sure people can see the number and word when connecting the pencil dots. I darken the pencil dots when necessary.

The pad k closed and placed On the table. I use the pages with the trimmed comers during my telepathy demonstration ("Books Galore").

Memory Aid: I write the name of the person who provided the pre-show information on an index card, and 1 place this index card on my table so 1 can quickly giancc at it iu case I forget the person's name.

Performance and Patter

Dunmnger died in 1975. Daring the last Jive years of his life, he dedicated himself to teaching others how to use some of the untapped powers of their minds to learn to live more effective lives.

He taught people rapid mathematics. He taught people h«v.v to influence other peoples choices. He taught them how to use nonverbal communication to determine if people are telling the truth.

And, amazingly, he taught some people how to read minds:

íVho would like i o learn How to communicate mind-to-mind? / need a volunteer to come up here with me and learn hov, to read minds. Please raise vottr hand because 1 don't wan! to ¡orce anyone to come up here.

I scan the audience and carefully select a person who looks like he or she will be cooperative and able to follow instructions. Here is where real intuition comes in! I invite this person or. stage.

Note: I experimented with selecting a volunteer randomly (for example, tossing a bail into the audience). It was a disaster! For some reason, many of the randomly selected people were not sh?.rp enough to play n!o.'ig with the gag, or couldnsee the dots, or felt inclined to tell people about the dots. Aj;other lesson learned the hard way.

Helio, my name Chuck Hickok; vottr name is... ? Rick, in o few minutes I will leach you some of the inner secrets of mind reading.

Io save lime earlier today I asked someone to help me if ill Sieve Davis please stand'.' Sieve, I want you to listen carefully and veritv that everything I'm saying is true. Before the show, 1 asked you to write down a number, a design, and a word. }'cí.' had a free choice. I didn't ask you to look at a list and select something. What you wrote down were, your totally free choices. Is oil of (hat one hundred percent accurate? And while you were doing (his. I was standing (en feel away with my back turned. And while my back was still turned, you placed your word, design, and number in three separate envelopes and sealed the e/tve

Friendly Persuasion

Friendly Persuasion

To do this successfully you need to build a clear path of action by using tools if necessary. These tools would be facts, evidence and stories which you know they can relate to. Plus you always want to have their best interests at heart, in other words, you know what is good for them

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