IkRifjk

This is a flourish, and like all flourishes, it should be used sparingly and deliberately. I emphasize this here because the riffle can become a nervous tick, subconsciously repeated without realizing that it annoys the spectators. In such circumstances it communicates an impression of clumsiness. Yet, if introduced judiciously, it can underscore dramatic moments, providing an artistic highlight ----- Hold the deck in left-hand dealing position with the left thumb stretched across the top near...

The Postyeek Overhmd shuffle Control

This method, suggested by Dai Vernon,8 can be used not only to control a card peeked at by a spectator, but any card under which a break is held, such as after a diagonal insertion. It is an extremely versatile technique that will prove useful to you in many situations. Hold a left little-finger break under the card to be controlled With your right hand, grasp the deck in preparation to adjust it to overhand shuffle position. The right thumb and middle finger are at the ends near the right...

The H ink shuffle Force

The Hindu shuffle provides you with a simple and practical card force. One advantage of this method is that it does not require the spectators to remove cards from the deck. This allows those seated farther away to participate, which is particularly advantageous in a parlor-style performance, and is one of the reasons this technique is so often used. The force card is on the bottom of the deck. Begin a Hindu shuffle, but pull off a block of cards from the bottom of the deck rather than the top...

A Trijk False

In this technique described by Conradi-Horster in 18964 the deck is cut into thirds. Although this is not in conformance with professional card-table procedure, it is extremely convincing. What more could you ask Hold the deck in left-hand dealing position, use your right hand to cut off the top third and table the packet at Position A. Cut off the next tliird and place it at Position B. Finally take the remaining third from the left hand and table it at Position C. Take Packet A into right-l...

Letting the Spectator Shuffle with a Key Card

This subtlety can be introduced whenever you perform for a particularly skeptical audience or for fellow magicians. Thanks to a little-known fact, you can have a spectator shuffle the deck after your key card is placed. After positioning the key card next to the selection, give the deck to a spectator to shuffle, and mime the actions of an overhand shuffle. This assures that the spectator will shuffle in that fashion. Laymen shuffle with four to five shuffle actions. It is unlikely for the key...

Turning ova the Toy cad n

This one-handed technique for turning over the top card is a flourish devised by Dai Vernon. It is useful when, for example, you are already holding a card in the right hand and you want to turn both cards over simultaneously. Hold the deck in left-hand dealing position and press with the left index finger against its right side. At the same time, use the left thumb to push the top card to the right, so that it slides over the nail of the index finger. Immediately curl the outer phalanges of...

D riUfa Cards

Among them are as a flourish, as a method for having a card chosen, as a demonstration of the performer's lack of control over the cards, and as a way to prepare for a palm- Hold the deck in left-hand straddle dealing position. With the right liand take it in end grip, lift it about four inches above the left palm, then bring it back down. During this up-and-down motion, let the cards fall singly or in very small packets from the bottom of the deck. Begin this...

An Optical False Cut from the Hand

Hold the deck in left-hand dealing position. Grasp it by the sides in the right hand as in the illustration (shown from the front) and raise it to elevated dealing position. Pay particular attention to the position of the right index finger. Holding the cards at the fingertips, look at the deck. Now look at the audience while you cut the deck as follows With the right hand, sweep the lower portion of the deck back drawing it inward for about half its length then move it to the right and carry...

The Triple Cut from Bottom to

This technique is similar to the last, except that the bottom card is brought to the top, without disturbing the relative order of the cards. Hold the deck in leftrhand dealing position, with a little-finger break formed above the bottom card. Take the deck into right-hand end grip, shifting the break to the right thumb. Then perform a swing cut, using the right index finger to lift and pivot the top two-thirds of the deck into the left hand Place tire left hand's packet under the third of the...

May of the Hands

Outer Phalangeal Finger

Outside of the finger inside oi the finger outside of the finger inside oi the finger The Art of Performing Magic with Cards 1 Ho w to Get the Most from this Book 1 The Best Way to Learn from this Book 2 A Comment on the Illustrations 2 Thinking Beyond What is Immediately Required 3 Art and Expression in the Handling of Cards 3 How Much Theory is Necessary 4 A Brief History of Playing Cards 5 Chapter 1 Fundamental Techniques 13 Giving the Deck a Complete Cut 21 Spreading the Cards in the Hands...

The shamus Card

A card freely chosen by a spectator is found in the deck at a position determined by a shamus card. The obvious fact that the shamus card is randomly arrived at and could have been any card makes this trick all the more unexplainable. Allow a spectator to choose any card, show it to the rest of the audience and replace it in the deck. Bring it to the top using the overhand shuffle control. 'Your card is now somewhere in the deck. Of course, somewhere' means tha t it is in a particular location,...

Card Controls

Not everyone can be a star, but all can strive to do their best and Card controls are those techniques that secretly place one or more cards at a specific location in the deck. Most often a card is controlled to the top or bottom of the deck, but we will also encounter situations in which a card must be controlled to, say, fifth from the top. This chapter describes several direct techniques for accomplishing this. Additional methods will be described in forthcoming chapters of this course, in...

Tfie Secret Addition of Cards

This technique secretly allows you to add additional cards to a packet Pay close attention to the dynamic use of the gaze. This aspect of the technique was formulated by the brilliant Spanish magician Juan Tamariz and adds considerably to the deception. Let's assume that you are displaying the four Aces face up and wish to add three facedown indifferent cards beneath them in the process. Hold the deck in left-hand dealing position, with the left little finger holding a break under the top three...

The False Swing cut

Hold the deck in left-hand dealing position. Then grasp it in right-hand end grip and begin a swing cut (page 27). Carry out the cutting action, separating the packets. In this action, rotate the left hand at the wrist, turning it thumb upward and bringing its packet to a vertical position. Tap the left side of the right hand's packet against the top of the left hand's packet in a squaring action. Drop the right hand's packet on the table, then take the left hand's packet in right-hand end grip...

Ife Poyif card

This flourish is actually a light-hearted handling of the rising card plot, as a card actually rises in an unusual fashion at a right angle to the deck. It is the invention of the respected French amateur magician, Dr. Jules Dhotel.42 Hold the slightly unsquared deck in left-hand dealing position. Bring the right hand over the deck to take it into end grip and square the cards. In doing so, bevel them inward at the upper edge. With your right hand, pretend to pull a hair from your head. Fasten...

E Rdhkck Location

This is my simplified handling of a trick described by Persi Djaconi 0, which is in turn based on an idea by Harry Lorayne21. Someone freely chooses a card from a fan and replaces it anywhere in the deck. The spectator then shuffles the cards thoroughly. Nevertheless, the magician finds the card in a flash. Separate the red and black cards in the deck. For the sake of our explanation, let's assume that the red cards are on top of the black cards. Begin by giving the deck a few false shuffles....

The whoops Control

This is surely the easiest control in the chapter. It is based on an idea of American dealer and innovator U. F. Grant6 It is quite bold, but when properly executed there will be no suspicion that you are controlling a card. The bottom card of the face-down deck is secretly reversed there, face up. This is accomplished between tricks, or through one of the reversal techniques discussed in Chapter 24 (Volume 2). Dribble the cards into your left hand (page 24) and have a spectator choose one by...

Final Observations

A familiarity with the available outs will have a significant influence on your inner game, since you will then know there are one or more ways you can proceed should the force fail. With some performers, this knowledge produces such an increased self-confidence, the force nearly always succeeds In this force, you first shuffle the deck, then hold it in leftrhand dealing position while you riffle the outer left corners of the cards off your left thumb until a spectator calls stop. The deck is...

Court Card Conclave

This methodologically simple, but astonisl ng and extremely deceptive trick is the creation of the American magician, Nick Trost, who constantly surprises his colleagues with direct effects using simple methods.6 The deck is again shuffled by a spectator. The performer removes the twelve court cards and displays their random order, after which he cuts them into the deck. They are then caused to rise magically to the top in matching pairs. Take the shuffled deck from the spectator and spread it...

Spread Cull Techniques

77lis hick, properly understood, thoroughly studied and performed with virtuosity, produces an enormous success. But, from beginning to end, it requires a consummate card conjurer. Otherwise, no A cull is a secret technique for arranging one or more cards at a desired location in the deck, usually at the top or bottom. The culling technique explained in this chapter has a broad range of applications. It can be used not only to control, position and transfer cards, but also to get you out of...

The Swivel cut

The swivel cut is the creation of the American vaudeville legend, Nate Leipzig.40 It is a two-handed flourish that, as you will see in subsequent chapters, has many possible applications to trick techniques. Hold the deck in left-hand dealing positioa Then take the deck into right-hand end grip. Immediately place the tip of the left index finger against the inner end of the deck. Lift the upper half of the deck slightly with the left index finger and begin to pivot this packet to the left and...

The Ribbon spread Turnover

This flourish is easy, but has an extremely strong effect on an audience. You already know how to make the ribbon spread, as it was taught on page 35. I will describe here several ways to complete the flourish or amplify its effect Ribbon spread the cards face down from left to right and, with the tips of your left fingers, raise the left side of the bottom card of the spread until this card reaches a vertical position, its right side still in contact with the table. Press your right thumb (or...

Useful Auxiliary Sleights

Few things are impossible to diligence and skill This chapter describes several useful sleights that vary in degree of difficulty and do not easily fit another chapter topic. No tricks using them are given here, but they will be employed frequently in effects taught in subsequent chapters. In this technique, the left thumb secretly counts a specific number of cards. Theoretically, you could count any number, but in practice the number is generally limited to less than a dozen. The cards can be...

Seventh son of a Seventh

A simple method coupled with a mysterious and fascinating presentation make this a strong and memorable effect for lay audiences. To create it I have simplified the handling of a trick titled The Seventh Son in Hugard and Braue's Expert Card Technique.18 Someone removes a card from the deck without looking at it Three spectators then each name a number and for each the magician deals that number of cards face down on the table. The card removed by the first spectator turns out to be a Seven....

Construction Management and Script

Spread the deck face up between your hands and cut it to bring the Ace of Clubs to the face. Spread through the cards again and outjog the Jack, Queen, King and Ace of Spades, so that they project halfway from the spread. With your right hand, remove these four cards from the spread and place them on the face of the squared deck, with the Jack at the face, followed by the Queen, then the King and finally the Ace. Spread the first three cards to display the four spades, while keeping the ace of...

The B Mica Force

This technique was originated by the American magician Ed Balducd.141 shall describe here the most basic handling, which has inspired numerous variations since its inception. The force card is second from the top of the deck. Let's assume that the top card is the Ace of Spades and the intended force card beneath it is the King of Hearts. First demonstrate what you wish the spectator to do Cut off about a third of the deck from the top and turn it over, placing it face up on the face-down tabled...

The closed Rip skifk

Position the deck on the table with one side facing you and grasp the cards as shown in the illustration. The bases of the little fingers contact the table, giving the hands a relaxed appearance. The thumbs are at their respective inner corners. The outer phalanges of the ring fingers are bent so that their outer sides contact the ends of the deck at the outer corners. The little fingers lie next to the ring fingers. Finally, the outer phalanges of the index fingers are bent and contact the top...

Peek Control for Two cards

In principle, the number of cards noted and controlled by consecutive peeks is limited only by the number of fingers lying along the right side of the deck, since each can hold a break. For practical purposes this kind of control is limited to three cards. Here is a simple method for controlling two peeked cards, invented by the remarkable American card master Edward Mario.9 Hold the deck in left-hand peek position. Riffle the outer right comer of the deck and ask a spectator to call stop....