Han Ping Cup Move

This is an interesting adaptation of the Han Ping Chien coin sleight that may be incorporated into any Cups and Balls or Chop Cup routine. Start with a ball perched atop the cup. The right hand grasps the cup by its sides, lifts it three or four inches from the table and tilts it forward and to the left, tipping the ball off the cup. The ball is caught neatly in the waiting left hand. This is shown in Figure 1. The left hand closes loosely over the ball, pausing just long enough before doing so...

Info

Just as the coin is about to drop completely from the tube the right hand uses the bill to flick the back edge of the coin up, tumbling the coin over and onto the innermost phalanges of the left fingers as shown in Figure 16. Pause a beat to let the coin's appearance register completely. Then lift the right thumb from the bill's outer end so that it starts to unroll. Clip the loose end of the unrolling bill between the left first and second fingers and let it finish unrolling as the right...

Buster

Effect A pencil is visibly and audibly snapped in two while out of the performer's hands. All of the props are ordinary, and everything may be inspected at the conclusion of the effect. Method Required are an ordinary pencil and a plastic cup. The plastic cup must be of the variety that has a bottom that can be pushed out from the inside of the cup and will snap back into place with a loud pop when squeezed. The seven ounce plastic drinking cup manufactured by the Alchem Plastic Company is one...

Piano Concerto

The Piano Card Trick is an old classic, yet it is seldom seen performed these days. Nate Leipzig, Dai Vernon, Francis Carlyle and John Mulholland are just a few of the professionals who recognized the power of this simple trick and used it often. Its first appearance in print was in the August 1902 issue of Ellis Stanyon's Magic. Its creator is unfortunately nameless. It has been reprinted many times over the years, but little further thought has been given it. In the late 50s and early 60s...

Michael Weber

Buster Fear & Loathing In Las Vegas The Face-Up Incredible Card Tunnel Pinched Again Handkerchief Through Glass Topsy Turvy Finely Poker Challenge RemarkerAble 1984 Triple Whammy The Scoop-Displacement Coin Vanish The Scoop-Displacement Coin Change Coin-Nection Piano Concerto Sans Fronds Alloy Division

Tom Ogden

Dear Adam Here's the trick for the 1984 Symposium book. The plot of 1984 struck me as being particular relevant with the theme of Doublethink. As I mention in the patter line, as magicians we deal in Doublethink everyday. And this is the first year of the Doublethink Symposuim - one in New York and one in San Francisco. And speaking of Doublethink trivia, does anyone know that George Orwell was not his real name It was Eric Blair. Even he was a product-victim of his own nom de plume - Tom....

Coin Nection

The principle exploited in this routine is not new. It has been used variously and ingeniously by Sam Schartz, Ned Rutledge, Ed Mellon, Steve Skomp and Larry Becker. But as it is applied here to automatically effect a prediction in the innocent act of picking up an object credit goes to T.A. Waters. Steve Dusheck has used this clever idea several times in marketed tricks. But never has he twisted, turned and squeezed so much work from this delightful principle. Where one effect is usually...

Sans Fronds

Dai Vernon is fond of posing problems for Phil to solve. Some months ago he described to Phil a routine he had seen done by Larry Jennings. The plot bore a relationship to some Elmsley effects First, an unidentified mystery card was openly placed into the performer's coat pocket. Now, a freely selected (and, if desired, signed) card was sandwiched between two Jokers. The sandwiched card vanished from the pocket. The spectator reached into the performer's pocket and removed the single card...

Remarker Able

Jay is one of the few young and truly innovative thinkers in magic today. His thoughts and writings on the philosophy of magic as an art impress some, incense others, while we hope all will at least respect the fact that he is thinking. Jay was one of the special Close-Up Hosts at the 1984 Symposium in New York. This routine is given in Jay's own words. The following truly visual and startlingly impromptu production of three magic markers was created to avoid the tedious and definitely...

Cigarette Extravaganza

Effect The basic effect here is the production of two cigarettes and then their vanish. But, this is a power- packed routine which looks like such to the audience The performer takes a regular cigarette rolling paper and holds it in one hand. His other hand, seen to be empty, reaches into the air and pours out loose tobacco into the paper. The performer rolls the paper and tobacco into a cigarette with an impressive one- handed flourish. The cigarette is put to the performer's lips. Now, the...

Martin Nash

By working from left to right you will end in a position with the right edge of the pack shielded from the audience's view. This is done to insure that no accidental glimpse of the three breaks can be had. The deck is now lowered to dealing position and the right hand comes over it to square the cards. The right fingers rest on the outer end of the pack while the right thumb holds steady all three breaks at the back. This frees the left fingers so that they may dig into the breaks and push the...

Joe Safuto

One final thing You will require a quarter length of a third cigarette taken from the open pack. The rest of the pack may be discarded. When ready to perform, secretly get the quarter piece of cigarette into the right hand, clipped betwen the first and second fingers near the tips as shown in Figure 2. You introduce the routine with a speech along these lines I am going to demonstrate a true illusion. It is a true illusion in that nothing that you will see in the next few moments will actually...

Richard Kaufman

The inspiration for this effect was Ken Krenzel's Incredible Card Tunnel (see The New Stars Of Magic), where two blank cards apparently changed into two selections as they were tunneled through the deck. There were two things about the routine I didn't like. One was the fact that you didn't really have two blank cards, and so they couldn't be examined and the other was that when the blanks changed into the selections one was face-up while the other was face-down you had to keep turning the deck...

The Phoenix Four

Effect While the pack is out of the magician's hands, four cards are freely selected and randomly buried in the deck. Yet, with no apparent manipulation of the cards, it is convincingly shown that all four selections have vanished from the deck. The deck is cut into four groups as each group is cut, one of the selections is named by the magician, though there seems no way he can have discovered their identities. As each card is named it is spelled with the group of cards that has been cut off...

Hoover Cards

This is a funny, very commercial routine which I'm using regularly in my professional close-up program in restaurants and night-clubs. Basically, it's a card revelation. I use it as one of a series of revelations. The cards are selected, returned to the deck, controlled to the top and then revealed in different ways. In the beginning, the unsigned cards are produced (I use Piet Forton's Pop-Out Move, color changes, etc.). The last revelations are so seemingly impossible that I have these chosen...

Topsy Turvy Finely Finished

A long-time standard of magic is U.F. Grant's Topsy-Turvy Bottles. Actually, Grant called his method for the Topsy-Turvy Bottles Tricky Bottles. Despite this, most magicians still cling to the older title. John's routine can be done with either version however, since the original Topsy-Turvy Bottles are now collectors' items, it is assumed that most will be using the Grant set. Topsy-Turvy Bottles is the trick wherein a spectator follows the actions of the magician with a bottle and tube yet...

Revised Chop Cup Routine

In 1977 David published his Chop Cup routine in his lecture notes. As with anything in the hands of an artist, with constant use, little improvements are made over the years that add polish and clarity to the piece. That is what David has done with his Chop Cup routine. David's routine has a number of features to its credit, not the least of which are its difference from most of the routines currently in use and its avoidance of the potentially awkward situation of asking a spectator to guess...

Any Reel Locking Reel

The Stop or Locking Reel is a dealers' item that sells for no less than twenty-five dollars. However, here is a simple method that Fantasio uses that can transform any regular Reel into a Locking Reel without damaging the prop. Find a small piece of leather about one-eighth of an inch thick and cut a circle disc of about three-eighths of an inch diameter. Using a needle, make a hole in its center as shown in Figure 1. Pull out the Reel's thread and insert the end through the hole in the disc....

Triple Whammy

Effect A selected card is lost within the deck. A Joker, which is seen to have a corner missing, is removed from the card case. The corner in question is dumped from the case and shown to match the Joker perfectly. The piece is now tabled face-down in plain sight. You now explain that the Joker has been marked for easy identification via the missing index. The Joker will now be used to find the selected card. It is shuffled into the deck and the latter is given a face-down Ribbon Spread. Much...

Tom Gagnon

To the onlookers, the above actions appear as if you have merely scooped and dumped the quarter into your left hand. By brushing the card's face across your left fingertips as depicted in Figure 5, the card effectively screens your empty left palm from the audience's view. Now, using an unbroken rhythm, close your left hand into a fist, as if receiving the quarter, and swing the card and coin inward as shown in Figure 6, a performer's view. Continue without pause to swing your right hand inward...