Phase Three Named Ace with an Odd Coloured Back II

If it's an Ace of the SAME colour as the one you just showed to be an odd-colour then simply snap your fingers over it and turn it over to show it, too, is now the odd-colour. Turn over the other two aces and you finish clean. If it's an Ace of the OPPOSITE colour then casually re-arrange the packet (if need be) so that the Ace named is third from top. 50 of the time it'll be in the correct position anyway. This can be done cleanly with a simple separation of the cards, two in each hand as you...

Working

Begin by removing the four Kings and four Aces from the deck and placing them in one face up pile on the table with the Aces on top of the Kings. The order of the suits is not important. 2. Have a card freely selected from the remainder of the deck by a spectator, noted and tabled (the card can be face up as it doesn't really matter if you see it). 3. Pick up the Aces and Kings and spread them (Aces on top of Kings) to display the cards. Square up the packet, getting a break above the lower two...

Duplicates

By allowing spectators to choose the numbers, it's possible that the finished square will contain duplicate numbers. See figures (9a b), which show the start and finish of a square for 80. The likelihood of this happening is greatly reduced by suggesting a choice of numbers from 1-10, then 10-20, then 20-30 and 30-40. There won't be any duplicates if the chosen numbers are widely spaced 3-12-22-34 for example. In fact if there's a gap of seven between the numbers, there won't be any duplicates....

Paul Gordon

Note This effect just missed being included in the 1st edition of Explorations a new (2006) booklet utilising three mathematical principles. Explorations contains a few effects from Peter Duffie, too. If interested in this kind of work, see my website http www.paulgordon.net acatalog for more info. Gene Finnell's Free Cut Principle (1967) is a fascinating, if somewhat confusingly written, booklet. Utilising his principle in conjunction with Victor Farelli's Mystic Seven concept is interesting....

Thanks To Goodliffe

Only recently (January 2OO6), I was being interviewed for a new DVD about professional magicians and my own magical background. In preparation for the interview, I dug out a few old magic memorabilia files and I located this trick. In fact, it was rejected by Goodliffe (for Abra) in 1980 as being too advanced (for his readers.) He suggested I send it to another magazine, which I did. (It appeared, years later, but not in my name - but that's another story ) With the letter was attached a fifty...

Ace Of Diamonds

Take these seven banknotes in the order above, (the 'BANANA' being the topmost banknote) and place them writing side down into the other (empty) side of the wallet. 1. Remove the wallet and open it on the side with the seven banknotes. Remove the banknotes and explain to the spectators that they have a chance of winning some money. As these words are spoken, you remove the top banknote (the one with the word BANANA written on it) and place it in front of the spectator (writing side down). Keep...

Insertion Technique

Suzie, the beautiful fictitious spectator, is asked to name any card. Let's imagine she says the Eight of Clubs. She is then handed a business card and asked to mime pushing it into an imaginary pack of cards so that the magician can observe her technique. After carefully watching the way she does this, the magician takes back the business card and writes a prediction on the reverse side. It is only after this prediction has been made that Suzie inserts the business card into the real pack of...

Clairvoyant Plus Colour

In this version you are probably asking the spectator to give away too much information at the start as to what type of card they are thinking of. However, I am mentioning it as a possible third method. If they name odd, say, And name either red or black. Then say, Okay, so think of any odd-value red black card. They deal the value onto the table, and then spell-deal either 'r-e-d' (three cards) or b-l-a-c-k (five cards) onto the first dealt pile. They place the talon on top, cut in half and...

Clairvoyant Plus Name

If you do not care for the wand idea, you may prefer this. (Cf. Jon Racherbaumer's 'Wee-Hours Cardician's Dream' from Dreamwork, 2004.) If they nominate odd, and after thinking of an odd card deal that value to the table, instruct them to then spell their name (if it contains an odd number of letters) or else the word 'magic', spell-dealing these cards on top of the first dealt packet. For example, if their name is Roger they deal 5 cards on top of the first dealt pile while verbally spelling,...

Working for Magician Makes Good Once Again

Place the card case with the adhesive side up to the right-hand side of your working surface. The long sides of the case should be parallel to the rear edge of the table. Explain that when requested you want someone to call out 'stop' as you riffle the cards. During this explanation, riffle down to the short corner card and break the pack at this point, placing the top portion onto the table. Explain that you will take the card stopped at and place it, sight unseen, onto the card case....

Lewis Jones

In Max Maven's effect Autome, a few members of the audience jot down different page numbers on a blank card. Without looking at the list, you hold it up and show it to someone who has been holding a novel. He makes a mental choice of one of the numbers, then turns to this page in the novel, and concentrates on the first line or sentence. You reveal the content of the sentence. I have never been happy with some of the curious restrictions involved in this type of effect. For example, why make a...

Sad Aces

This micro-Triumph effect started off ages ago as a one phase effect I thought might belong in a longer, established routine. Recently, it was the addition of the named Ace that helped me come up with a routine for it. I will describe it as I do it. While I consider myself a right hander, magic dictates I am a left hander. For ease of me writing while going through it myself, I will describe it exactly as I do it. After a favourite Ace is named, you alternate the four Aces face up & face...

Trial Separation

A Joker is placed face up in the middle of the deck. One spectator picks a card from above it and one from below, to ensure they are different. However, when they look through the deck they find both cards have now completely vanished. The cards are recovered in an extremely unexpected way. Just a deck of cards with one Joker. Arrange it so the spectators are either side of you. It's important they do not see each others selections. 1. In a moment I want you both to pick a card but I want to...

Centrifugal Elevator

I decided to include this routine, with Kevin's permission, because it requires two Double Lifts, but both must be from the centre 1. Run through the deck, remove the two black Jacks and place them face down on top of the face down deck, saying, These are my assistants they will do the magic in this trick. I'll leave them on top so we know where they are. 2. Hold the deck face down in readiness for the Centrifugal Lift. Ask spectator A to call stop as you run your thumb down the outer corner....

Freer Chance

Six cards are shuffled and dealt into a face up row. You explain that they will choose one of the cards and you will also choose one, but you'll try to influence their choice. Point out that there is only one court card, so they may choose that card because of this fact or avoid it for the very same reason. The joker isn't really a playing card at all, so this may attract or repel them. One of the cards has the name Fred written across it. You won't explain why this is so, but if they know...

Sean Carpenters General Magic

At any banquet table of complete strangers, a spectator's name is found written across the back of his chosen card. This routine is taken from my DVD, Sean Carpenter's General Magic, available in the UK from www.albionmagiccompany.co.uk I was in my early teens when I first saw Mike Gancia produce a spectator's name on the back of a chosen card. Mike's method was simply to find out someone's name in advance and then write it onto the card he wanted to force. It's a great effect if you can learn...

Andy Hurst

This is an impossible location where the magician goes out of the way to cancel out the possible ways the trick could be done. I'm sure you've all seen magicians who have you take a card and then they work out which one it was. Or maybe you've got an uncle who has done the trick with piles of cards and lots of dealing and you've had to politely applaud his ability to do something that works itself mathematically. And some of you will have come across marked cards and maybe even suspect that a...

Thumbs Up

Although there is quite some preparation required to make this trick up, I think the effort is worth it. It's a commercial packet trick (based on Bob Hummer's 'This Is It' from Karl Fulves' Bob Hummer's Collected Secrets) wherein you end clean. I was going to release this as a marketed item. The 'cost to retail' ratio meant it wasn't (isn't) worth it. However, I still retain the right to do so should I feel the urge Before you read the following few paragraphs, you might want to quickly read...

End Notes

If you have Simon Aaronson's book Try the Impossible, you will see that you could just as easily use a 10 and a 9 as your key cards, and adjust the deck position of the one that's placed deep accordingly. 19 or 20 is really a minimum without limiting the cutting more. You could of course go to 26 if you used two kings. I prefer to avoid court cards as the keys, and it makes it seem more realistic and random because I explained the value of court cards and none came up. Mike Rose is 28 years old...

Ring Flash

My original RingFlash also appeared in my Pro-File book but the following improved handling and method is far superior and easier to perform. A 2 ish square of flash-paper with a hole at the centre, an 18 ish length of fine gold or plated chain and a box of matches. The box of matches is half open and the chain is within the sleeve of the box resting on the drawer. To keep this from upsetting, I place the box in my right side jacket ticket pocket. The square of flash paper is in the main right...

Anthonys Ascanio Anthony Brahams

What follows is a simple and neat handling for the Ascanio Spread that results in an even spread without any jogging, or other manoeuvring of the cards, or the block. Let's assume you have five cards and you wish to show these as four - hiding the middle card. For this description, we will use four Kings with any random card in the centre position. a Hold the packet face up in the left hand as if for dealing. b Bring the left hand over to grip the packet from above, fingers at the front and...

Progressive Jacks

A sandwich routine in which the red Jacks find the black Jacks and the black Jacks find the selected card. 1. Remove the four Jacks from the deck and place them face down on the table. This is a take a card trick. You can take any card. . . except one of these. You'll see why in a moment. Spread the rest of the deck face down between the hands and have one of these cards selected. The spectator remembers the selection and replaces it. And, of course, you control it. This time to the face of the...

Surprise Royal Flush Deal

In fact, there are two surprises in this routine. Roger does not compromise regarding the method used to accomplish this effect but astute cardicians will be able to find ways around if they wish. Four cards found at random are magically changed to the four Aces. The magician offers to show how to stack the Aces so that they fall to his hand in a game of cards but, once again, the cards change and the magician's hand is revealed to be a Royal Flush. 1. You are going to secretly cull the King,...

The Devils Card

This is something of a m lange - the effect is essentially that of Allan Brown's 'Speak of the Devil' from the August '68 issue of Pallbearer's Review, along with a seriously lateral reworking of Dave Ossip's Miracle Coin Fold from the January '71 issue of the same magazine, combined with Father Cyprian's Solid Gold Prediction from The Elegant Card Magic of Fr. Cyprian. I actually created this handling to provide a vehicle for my bizarrist leanings although it has been used in a regular card...

Paul Gordon Roger Crosthwaite

Aldo Colombini presents Adagio that utilises a very ingenious easy-to-do subtlety by Peter Duffie on his 'Impromptu Card Magic' DVD series. The subtlety originally appeared in Peter's Return to Garden Path which was published on his website, and Garden Path II that appeared in Cardeceits ebook, 2003 . Peter's concept secretly sets a packet of cards to enable an unexpected change of several face up cards, using a very simple and direct means. Using Peter's amp Aldo's ideas, Roger Crosthwaite and...

Shiv Duggal

I came up with this version of The Whisperers effect a couple of months after Jerry published his version in Alternative Card Magic. I have always thought there is an inherent weakness in effects that are based on repetition, such as the cups and balls and the ambitious card routine. As the effect proceeds, the audience can start to anticipate what is going to happen next making the job of misdirecting them harder, as well as lessening the surprise element of the routines. This is also true of...

Polygraph

This trick is Roger's variation of the well known lie detector theme and was first published in Abacus magazine. Inspiration came from Gary Plant's Computerised Lie Detector from Precursor magazine XVIL and there are many other examples in print. The method has been changed in an attempt to simplify and the spectator's selection is made from the balance of the pack rather than from amongst the 'computer' cards. There is no memory work involved and no set-up is necessary beforehand so you can...

An overview of The Magic Square

Most magicians, when discussing Magic Squares, adopt an approach of simplification. That is, whatever the method, the aim is to demonstrate how simple it all is and that nothing is required beyond basic arithmetic. I did this myself in the book, Round The Square. Figure 1 shows the most basic and simple of magic squares for the number 50. Figure 2 shows the same simple square for the number 65. Basic and Simple. But is it easy Well, the arithmetic is not taxing. To get the square started,...

Endgame

The magic fraternity has an ambivalent approach to Magic Squares. Not being entirely self-working is a major obstacle for many, despite their appeal not surprising, really, because when you think about it, the same applies to most magic tricks. I don't really like magic squares, is the spoken word. I'd like to do that but it's too much like work, is the thought. For magic squares substitute anything you like. The spoken word is I don't like packet tricks. The thought is I'd like to do that but...

AE Smith January 2006

The following routine is 'Al's favourite' and has been taken from his excellent book Round the Square, 2003. This follows on from the previous chapter and forms the basis of much of what lies ahead. If you are familiar with the placement of numbers already discussed, then this will be a formality. There are absolutely no behind-the-scenes maths involved at all. That is, no calculations, no subtractions, no key numbers nothing but a simple sequential procedure. Unlike all other magic squares, no...

Justin Higham

Back in 1990 I devised a location effect based on Ed Mario's 'Cardician's Dream' The Cardician, 1953 , which in turn was based on Bob Hummer's 'Mindreader's Dream' 1952 . This was called 'Clairvoyant', and published in Technomagic Extra No. 4, June 1991. The basic principle involved an alternating red-black stack, applied in the following way If you deal any even number of cards to the table, place the deck on top, cut the deck, and Reverse Faro, then looking through either half will reveal an...