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GREATER MAGIC LIBRARY

Conjuring's greatest clasic, now available in 5 separate volumes, with a total of 1,000 pages.

Price per volume 21/-Postage 9d.

ABBOTT'S ENCYCLOPEDIA OF ROPE TRICKS

128 ' double size' pages and every conceivable rope trick. The new enlarged edition.

Price 21/-Postage 7d.

SCIENCE MAGIC By Kenneth Swezey

A fine 182 pp. cloth-bound book with masses of photographs illustrating hundreds of fascinating chemical and science tricks.

Price 16/-Postage 1/-

DOING MAGIC FOR YOUNGSTERS By Bert Easley

Includes also the full text of Eric P. Wilson's classic, THE ART OF CONJURING TO CHILDREN. 128 pp. Cloth.

Price 25/-Postage 8d.

THE DIA YERNON BOOK

By Lewis Ganson

No need to extol the virtues of this great work.

Price 45/-Postage 1/4

PLAYING CARDS

HISTORY AND SECRETS

OF THE PACK

By W. Gurney Benham

196 pp. Dozens of beautifully coloured illustrations. A few only, in mint condition!

Price 35/-Postage 1/4

AFTER-DINNER

SCIENCE

By Kenneth Swezey

Hundreds of '-science tricks' to perform at the dinner table. 182 pp. Cloth bound, masses of photographs.

EFFECTIVE CARD MAGIC By Bill Simon

A cloth-bound book of 182 pages of first-rate card magic by one of America's top card men.

Price 47/-Postage 1/-

GRAND

DECEPTIONS

By Alexander Klein

The World's most spectacular hoaxes, impostures, ruses and frauds. Fascinating!

Price 21/-Postage 1/1

ENCYCLOPEDIA

OF CIGARETTE TRICKS

By Keith Clark

The only worth-while book on this subject. 304 pp. Fine cloth-bound book.

Price 52/6 Postage 1/2

MODERN

HANDCUFF SECRETS

FOR MAGICIANS

By Dick Norman

Everything you need to know about escaping from handcuffs. 112 pp. Board covers.

Price 60/-Postage 6d.

NICK'S

TABLE TRIX

By Nick Trost

A well illustrated manuscript publication of tricks for the card table and the author's fine Ring and Rope Routine.

Price 7/-Postage 3d.

-jAr Write for oar full Book List containing hundreds of Titles ^

THE MAGIC WAND PUBLISHING COMPANY

62 WELLINGTON ROAD, ENFIELD, MIDDLESEX

The Magic Circle

President: Herbert J. Collings, Esq. Vice-President: Francis White, Esq.

Clubroom and Library and Museum : Hearts of Oak Buildings, Euston Road, London, N.W.I.

Magical Theatre -

King George's Hall, W.C

Summer Recess

Particulars from Hon. Secretary : Peter Newcombe 38 Overdale Avenue New Maiden, Surrey

PETER WARLOCK'S

PENTAGRAM

is published on the 24th of each month and can be obtained direct from the publishers for 1(7 per single copy. Annual SubacriptiM 18/-

post free. PUBLISHED BY: The Magic Wand Publishing Co. 62 Wellington Road, Enfield Middlesex

Manuscripts for publication and books for review should be sent to the:

EDITORIAL ADDRESS:

Peter Warlock, 24, Wordsworth Rd., Wailington, Surrey.

JACK HUGHES

will be pleased to »end you full details of

THE DE LUXE "SU-TABLB"

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Write now to

Jack Hughes, 2, Evelyn Ave., Colindale, London, N.W.9.

Every Advertiser's goods are fully endorsed by this Bulletin

THE HANDCUFFED CARDICIAN

HANS TRIXER

HERE IS a card trick with a most novel angle, an angle which can be most impressive with a lay audience. It is a modern version of an old effect, but then as is so often the old will seem to be new.

With a disclaimer that he is comparable to the great Houdini, the conjurer tells his audience that he Will endeavour to show them a card trick under the most difficult of all conditions, namely with his hands securely fastened together with a length of rope.

First of all a card is freely chosen from the pack, returned, and the pack is shuffled by a spectator, the cards being left in his hands. After his hands have been securely tied together the performer retrieves the pack from the spectator and succeeds in making the card appear in his (the performer's) hands.

Let me commence by saying that the trick is extremely easy. Do not however make the mistake of freeing yourself from the restraining tie for this would spoil the impression that your hands were truly imprisoned.

The requirements are few. They are : —

1. A pack of cards (these may be borrowed).

2. A length of string, rope or tape. This latter is placed beforehand in the outer rigt-hand coat pocket .

Presentation. Take the pack and ask a spectator to select a card. Suggest that it be marked and as it is, at the conjurer's request, returned to the pack, secretly crimp one corner. The pack can now be handed to another spectator for shuffling without any possibility of the chosen card being lost.

When the pack has been shuffled either of two procedures may be adopted. The first is to take back the pack from the spectator and noting the crimped card cut it to the top of the pack. The second way is to fan the cards in front of the spectator, and with the words, " You can see for yourself that your card is still here," leaf through the cards until you come to the crimped cards. Keep a slight finger break and leaf through the rest of the cards and then in the action of turning the cards face down execute a turnover pass so that the chosen card is on top of the pack.

With a preference for the single hand top palm the card is palmed off in the act of handing the pack to the spectator whilst the hand containing it goes to the right-hand pocket for the rope which is removed and handed to another spectator.

Place both hands behind the back in a folded position, as you remark that you wish him to tie your hands together behind your back. " Like this," you say and turn round with your back to the audience. In the brief interval, however, you have removed the card from the palm with the free hand and pushed it up into the sleeve where it is hidden.

The spectator now securely ties the performer's hands together, and when the tying is completed the performer once again turns and faces the audience.

" Just give the cards a cut and place them in my hands," says the performer. The spectator does as he is told and in a matter of seconds the performer allows the pack to drop to the ground whilst the card is retrieved from the sleeve. Immediately the performer asks the spectator to name his card. This is done and with a remark, "Please take from my hands the card I am holding," the spectator does so to find the selected card in his hand.

DOUBLE SURPRISE

JACK AVIS

IN THE recent English issue of " The Phoenix," No. 345, I described an effect which I called " All Fair Surprise." The basis of the routine is an original handling of a card switch. This switch is of general utility and to further demonstrate its usefulness the following routine is being offered. Preparation—nil, sleights required, top card reverse and an original card change.

Routine. A card is selected and controlled to the top of the pack. This card must now be reversed. The following procedure is simple and in keeping with the effect. The left hand holding the pack is placed behind the back and your patter runs as follows: "Without even looking at the cards I will try to divine the name of your selected card." You strike a pose of deep concentration and whilst in this meditative mood your left thumb is busy pushing the top card over the side of the pack and flipping it face up. You now remark pack and flipping it face up. You now remark that somehow the spectator's thoughts are not reaching you and so you must adopt another method to locate the chosen card. At this point the pack is brought from behind the back and fanned faces towards the audience in the right hand, being careful not to expose the top reversed card. On completing the fan the left hand appears to be adjusting a few cards in the fan but in fact the left thumb is busy drawing the reversed card to the left where it is gripped by the tip of the right thumb on the extreme right edge of the reversed card.

At this point tell the spectator you will attempt to locate his card by merely running your finger along the top edge of the fanned cards. The left forefinger now approaches the top left-hand side of the fan from the rear, and moves along the edge of the fan until you reach the centre.

Here you stop and make some remark about how sure you are that this is the selected card, and pull a card from the centre of the fan. Of course the spectators can see that you have made a mistake and tells you so. You act surprised, turn the card to face yourself and say " This nine of hearts is not your card? As you sure?" As you say the last few words look at the spectator and at this point the left-hand drops behind the fanned pack and slips the wrong card behind the selected card which you are holding by the tip of your right thumb and takes in its place the reversed card. The exchange having been made the card which you apparently removed from the centre of the fan is placed face down on the table. This card is, of course, now the selected card but believed by the spectators to be the wrong card.

You now patter to the effect that mind reading and your sense of touch seem to have failed you and therefore you must resort to magic. Whilst saying these few words you have squared up the pack, retaining it face up in the left hand, being careful once again not to expose the reversed card. Cut the cards once, bringing the reversed card to the centre. Order the spectator's chosen card to reverse itself in the pack. Fan the pack face up and reveal the reversed card. Ask the spectator to name his selected card and with a flourish turn the reverse card face up, only to find that it is the nine of hearts, the card which should be on the table. The tabled card is turned face up and now found to be the selected card thus bringing the effect to a satisfactory and magical conclusion.

SIMPLICITY TWO PERSON PREDICTION

PETER WARLOCK

AT THE conclusion of one or more effects where the mentalist's partner has given some proof of her psychic powers, and for this purpose has been isolated behind a threefold screen, the performer informs his audience that he wishes to conclude his demonstration by showing the prophetic powers of his assistant. A slate, after being initialled with chalk by a spectator, is passed with the chalk to the medium behind the screen. She is asked to write three predictions for three spectators who will be called A, B and C respectively.

Whilst she is writing the mentallist stalls by making some remarks regarding this particular phase of mentalism. Reaching behind the screen the mentalist takes the slate with the initialled side outwards and rests it against the edge of the screen. (Fig. 1.)

Three spectators are now asked to take part. The first designated A is asked to name the first four-figure number which enters his head. We'll suppose that it is 1360. On a large slate or blackboard the mentalist now writes " A ... 1360." The

next spectator, B is then asked to name any city in the world. With the reply ' York,' on the blackboard under A's selection goes, "B . . . York." C is then handed a pack of cards with a request that he shuffles the cards and requests his immediate neighbour to take one. Before the card is exposed to the audience the performer picks up a large envelope and handing it to spectator C relieves him of the remaining portion of the pack.

The slate is now picked up and turned round. On it in the medium's writing is seen: — A . . . 1360 B . . . York C . . . Reversed

The slate is placed down, the sealed envelope being taken and slit open with a knife. From it is removed a Jumbo pack of cards which when fanned reveal, reversed in the pack, the card held by C's neighbour!

The Requirements.

The inherent weakness of the effect lies in the fact that the performer's assistant is behind the screen. This weakness, however, is overcome providing that before the prediction, certain tests are carried out which necessitate this isolation of the assistant.

The requirements are few. They are: —

One reasonably large slate with a well fitting flap. A blackboard on easel (or another large slate).

Two packs of cards, one ordinary size and one Jumbo as described in "Taped Slate." The Jumbo pack, as in that trick, is sealed in a large envelope.

Before the performance takes place the following words are written on the slate by the assistant: —

The flap is then adjusted into the slate frame writing side downwards. The slate now appears to be blank on both sides.

The set-up of the articles should be slate on table, flap uppermost, piece of chalk and packs of cards adjacent. Blackboard or large slate left of stage.

The Presentation.

Taking the slate and chalk from the table, the performer, after casually showing it, asks a spectator to write his initials on the non-flap side, the flap being held in position as he does this.

Moving back, the slate and chalk are passed behind the screen to the assistant, who first removes the flap and rests it against the leg of the chair on which she is sitting and then makes as much noise as she can with the chalk writing a number of words on the slate surface proper. Asking if she has completed her prophecies and receiving an affirmative answer, the performer takes the slate from her, and keeping the side with the spectator's initials towards the audience places it on the ground, allowing it to rest against the edge of the screen. Immediately the slate has been taken from her the assistant picks up the flap and rests it on her lap with the writing side uppermost.

The three helpers are now chosen and A is asked to name a four figure number. When the assistant behind the screen hears the performer writing the number on the blackboard, she writes the same number as noiselessly as possible after the letter A, though as the performer is writing at the same time there is little chance that her writing could be heard.

B is requested to name a city and again as the performer writes, the assistant fills in the same word after B. Her task is now complete with the exception of one little thing. Being as careful and noiseless as she can she places the flap, writing side outwards against that edge of the screen where the slate rests. She places it so that it aligns as closely as possible with the slate (Fig. 2).

The regular size pack of cards is taken and handed to C, who in turn shuffles it and asks his neighbour to select any one card. Attention is called to the sealed packet which is handed to C, the pack held by him being taken back and placed on the table.

The spectator with the card is asked to name it and on the blackboard, against C, the name of the card is written.

Now for the climax. The performer bends down and with thumb at rear and fingers in front takes slate and flap as one. Too much pressure must not be used, otherwise there will be a click as the flap comes into contact with the slate. The very slightest of pressures combined with a sideways movement will show that this can be easily accomplished after adequate rehearsal. The right hand has been used for this and immediately the

SIX IN A ROW

CORVELO

HERE IS a mental effect for close quarter work which can be most effective. First of all the mentallist removes from his pocket a sealed envelope which he places in a prominent position on the table.

Next he introduces a writing pad which consists of sheets of paper perforated so that six slips may be torn from each whole sheet.

Now in each of the six divisions a spectator writes his initials, and then with a request for the names of (say) six film stars the names given are written one on each of the perforated slips. The whole sheet is first torn from the pad, the same spectator who wrote his initials being asked to write his signature across the back of the whole sheet of paper.

The main sheet is then torn along the perforations and the six resulting slips laid ' Star' names down on the table. One is freely chosen and turned over. On it is written, we'll suppose, ' Bing Crosby.' A spectator is asked to unseal the envelope placed on the table at the beginning. He does so and removes from inside a card on which is written . . . ' I predict that the chosen name will be Bing Crosby.'

The secret lies in the note pad used. It can be easily made up by a local printer or bookbinder.

It consists of a number of sheets perforated at equal distance so that six slips may be torn from one main sheet. The topmost sheet a strip measuring one inch in width is cut away (see illustration). On the sheet under the narrow sheet write in each division, the name ' Bing Crosby' or the name of a star who is in the news. Now take an elastic band and place it around the pad (in the style of 'Out to Lunch '), so that it covers the shortened division. With a card on which you have written, ' I predict that the chosen name will be Bing Crosby,' sealed in an envelope you are ready for the presentation.

First of all take the sealed envelope and place it in a prominent position on the table. The pad is now introduced and a spectator requested to scribble his initials right of the elastic band on each perforated slip. Now ask for the names of six film stars making sure that one of those offered is Bing Crosby. Subtle approach in the mentalist's invitation should always bring in the ' force' name. If picture house has a star in the film use this, as its topicality will ensure it being given. As soon as the six names have been given and written on the six slips, turn the pad so that those near may see that the names are all different, and then turning the pad once more towards you remove the elastic band and tear off the second sheet and place it writing side down upon the table. The note pad is dropped into the left-hand side pocket.

The assisting spectator now writes his signature across the whole of the page and then the performer tears off the perforated slips keeping the film star names unseen and mixes them. A choice of one is made by the spectator and the others are gathered up screwed into a ball and dropped into the pocket. Leaving the chosen slip writing side undermost, the performer asks the spectator to open the sealed envelope and read what the performer wrote before the commencement of the experiment. He does and the slip on the table is slowly and deliberately turned over showing that the performer was successful in his prediction.

SIMPLICITY TWO PERSON PREDICTION—Continued from page 83

performer has regained full height, the left hand comes in to hold the left-hand side of the slate (a natural action). The thumb of this hand, which should be in contact with the flap, eases it into complete alignment and allows it to fit into the slate frame.

The performer is now ready to reveal the predictions. Slowly he turns the slate round. The first two cause for no comment other than wonderment. The third still needs confirmation. Taking the envelope from C, the person with the card is asked to hold his card aloft so that it can be seen by everybody including the performer. Tearing open the envelope the Jumbo cards are removed and fanned as in " Taped Slate," showing that in the final prediction the prophetress has been equally successful.

MATHEMATICS OF THE WEAVE SHUFFLE

ALEX. EMSLEY

Continued, from July issue

THE RE-STACKING PACK

We know that fifty-two cards return to their original order after eight out-shuffles. During these shuffles the top and bottom cards never move, and two more, the eighteenth and thirty-fifth, change places in each shuffle. The remaining forty-eight cards can be considered as lying in six chains, each chain comprising eight positions. A card at any of these positions will move through each of the other positions in its chain before returning to its original position after eight shuffles.

If we place four cards of the same value at alternate positions in a chain, after two shuffles each of the four cards will have moved into a position previously occupied by one of the others. For example, one chain is 2-3-5-9-17-33-14-27. If we place the four Jacks at 2, 5, 17, and 14, after two shuffles there will still be Jacks at each of these positions.

Hence, if we place four cards of the same value at alternate positions, in all the six chains, we shall have arranged twelve sets of four cards in forty-eight positions in such a way that after two shuffles, every one of the forty-eight positions will be occupied by a card of the same value as was originally at that position. If the remaining four cards of a kind go on top, eighteenth, thirty-fifth, and on the bottom, each of these cards will be in exactly the same position after two shuffles.

Thus we now have a stacked pack which, disregarding suits, returns to the same order after two out-shuffles.

The suits have been so arranged that, apart from the twos, after two shuffles the position previously occupied by any card will be occupied by the card of the same value which is next in the suit order Clubs-Hearts-Spades-Diamonds. The twos will always be in the same positions.

It will be seen that the cards fall into three groups of sixteen, separated by the twos. The suit order in each group of sixteen is the same. Dividing each group of sixteen into four sets of four, each set contains four cards of different suits. The orders of the suits in the second and third sets are respectively the reverse of the order in the first and fourth sets.

The card values fall into four classes, each comprising three values. The division of the values among the classes is, of course, arbitrary, but in the stack given above the classes are 3-7-J, 4-8-Q, 5-9-K, and 6-10-A. The values in any one class are always found in the same positions in the groups of sixteen.

It hardly needs saying that you can obtain other restacking stacks from this stack by interchanging cards of one value for cards of another value.

AFTERWORD

This article has not exhausted the properties of the weave shuffle. I have mentioned very few of the principles applicable to tricks—as I have said before, those principles are mostly the simple principles. Also, I must admit, there is one principle which I have kept back for purely selfish reasons because, although it is not simple, of the good audience tricks that can be based on it.

Nevertheless, I hope that I may have increased some people's knowledge of the weave, whether they be purely mathematicians, or whether they are intent on learning all they can about a pack of cards, in the belief that all knowledge must some day prove useful.

2-C

J-C

9-H

6-S

J-D

10-D

4-S

Q-H

9-C

5-S

Q-D

8-C

6-H

J-H

10-C

5-D

J-S

2-H

3-C

K-H

10-S

3-D

A-D

8-S

4-H

K-C

9-S

4-D

Q-C

10-H

3-H

A-C

9-D

3-S

2-S

7-C

5-H

A-S

7-D

6-D

Q-S

8-H

5-C

K-S

8-D

4-C

A-H

7-H

6-C

K-D

7-S

2-D

ERIK PADT

AT LEAST this is what the conjurer tells his audience. But when placing some apparatus on the table the audience spots a big size playing card at the performer's back, just under his coat.

" I never use cards because I don't like to bore you with that sterotype magician's question: have a card," explains the wizard once more and turns around to pick up his die box. Again a murmer is heard because a giant card is peeping from under his coat, but . . . this time it is a different card.

Seemingly the magician never is aware of the untruth of his patter.

" Everybody does card tricks, that's the reason I don't." So says the magi and turns around once more, just to give the audience opportunity to see the card protruding from under his coat, and this time it's a third different card. When his act is over and he turns around to leave the stage . . . there is no card at all.

For a gag-magician this will be a fine trick. If you are performing as " Mystic the Mystery Mixer" you had better leave it out.

The requirements for this gag are simple to make. Glue three giant cards together as in the illustration. Make a small holder on which the cards can turn and solder a safety-pin to this holder. The whole thing is pinned under your coat and all you have to do is to turn the " apparatus " a quarter turn when desired.

WRITING well in advance of the British Ring Convention with the knowledge that these words may appear in print after it has closed, can arouse interesting speculation. From the point of view taf stage presentation our interest lies chiefly in the thought of seeing the Italian magician Sitta. Appearing with a Chinese presentation and a stage name of Chun Chin Foo we look forward to seeing some of the delightful effects that he has described both in ' Triks' and ' Magia Moderna' the well produced Italian magical magazine. We are also interested in what the competition will bring forth. In this latter connection we hope that the standard will be higher than that of the past two years. It is always inexplicable to us that anyone can enter a competition with an act which not only is under rehearsed but is also lack ing in outstanding characteristic. The idea of attention to stage setting( and after all this a competition for stage magic) is too often conspicuous by its absence, a factor which is in direct contrast to the acts which participate in the Dutch competitions where so many competitors have gone to a great amount of trouble to make the stage attractive, and where the spectator before the performer's entrance is greeted with either the promise of novelty and /or an expression of good taste. In the recent Convention at Zwolle, ' Flip' Ronaldo, whose first prize-winning act we had seen in embryonic form way back in April used a gramophone record motif and all his tricks utilised records or the gramophone. The inspiration for stage setting which involves very little expense and trouble can be inspired quite easily by looking into the window displays of the bigger and better stores.

Go to the Magic Circle on a Monday evening where week after week members appear on the stage with what is intended to be a magical act. In a number of cases thought and rehearsal has gone into the finished product, but in the majority few tricks have been taken and without any thought of routining or even whether they fit the performer's personality they are thrown at the audience.

Our good friend Kalanag is gaining still more laurels in the international field of entertainment. After a tour, outstanding in its success, of Africa and South America, he is, as we type these words resting in New York before flying on to Canada where on August 30th he will present his show in a special theatre at the Great Canadian National Exhibition at Quebec. After this engagement he will go back to the United States and play Boston, Detroit, and Chicago before playing a season at Las Vegas. After that a six months' tour of the Far East is contemplated. Well knowing that the attraction of this greatest of all illusion acts inevitably results in an extension of contract, we feel that the Far East will keep Kalanag away from Europe for far longer than the six month period mentioned.

Many of you, no doubt, like ourselves are looking forward to the International Congress which commences on August 27th next year. The headquarters of the Congress will be at the Sophia Rooms, a lovely building which is just outside the 4 Ring ' only a stone's throw away from the Opera House. For the ladies who attend the shopping centres in Kaerntner Strasseand Mariahilfer Strasse are only a few minutes walk from the Sophia Rooms. At the headquarters things of material comfort such as food will be available so that the minimum of time shall be wasted on comparative triviality of eating. For ourselves we shall look forward to the days outside the Congress period when we visit the Schoenbrunn Palace, the Prater, the Vienna Woods and St. Stephens. To see the places associated with Haydn, Mozart and Vienna. To attend a performance at the greatest Opera House in the World. To eat in comfort the dishes for which the Viennese are so famous.

The magical event of August was the marriage of Gerry Larson to Art Baker, or as Herbert J. Collings wittily put it the marriage Art and Beauty. Present at the reception were leading personalities in British magic and representing America were Jack Kodell, George Boston and Cy Enfield. A truly jolly atmosphere prevailed and though this was the married couple's first acquaintance with British magicians en masse we know that they will return to these shores again.

With the sudden death of Lewis Messent, the Magic Circle has been robbed of one of its finest workers. Lewis who was a most modest and retiring type, was responsible for the Festivals of Magic at the Scala Theatre from the time that Freddy Shuter relinquished the position of Festival Manager. Tactful, diplomatic and full of genuine kindness workers. Lewis was a modest and retiring type, was responsible for the Festivals of Magic at the Scala Theatre from the time that Freddy Shuter relinquished the position of Festival Manager. Tactful, daplomatic and full of genuine kindness no artiste appearing in the bill ever had just cause for temperamental behaviour. We shall miss him very much.

Incidentally for the benefit of those visiting the Hastings area during the holiday season we would like to mention that our old friend Roland Spray, who unable to follow his normal occupation of sign writing owing to eye trouble has now opened a Magic Shop at 110, Bohemia Road, St. Leonards-on-Sea. We wish him success with this enterprise.

WANTED

THE JINX—Summer Extra 1936 and No. 129 in the original Annemann editions only. THE BAT—Nos. 53 and 73.

CONJURERS CHRONICLE—Vol. 8, Nos. 1, 2, 3, 6; Vol. 9, No. 3; Vol. 10, Nos. 1, 3 ; Vol. 11, Nos. 1, 2, 3; Vol. 12, No. 2 ; Vol. 13, No. 1.

CORNISH PIXIE—Vol. 1 (1943) Nos. 1, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9. (NOTE: This magazine started numbering from No. 1 again, in 1944. 1943 EDITIONS ONLY ARE REQUIRED.)

| STATE CONDITION AND PRICE WANTED |

GEORGE ARMSTRONG

62 WELLINGTON ROAD, ENFIELD, MIDDLESEX

A SELECTION OF

^ THE LATEST BOOKS ^

GREATER MAGIC LIBRARY

Conjuring's greatest clasic, now available in 5 separate volumes, with a total of 1,000 pages.

Price per volume 21/-Postage 9d.

ABBOTT'S ENCYCLOPEDIA OF ROPE TRICKS

128 ' double size' pages and every conceivable rope trick. The new enlarged edition.

Price 21/-Postage 7d.

SCIENCE MAGIC By Kenneth Swezey

A fine 182 pp. cloth-bound book with masses of photographs illustrating hundreds of fascinating chemical and science tricks.

Price 16/-Postage 1/-

DOING MAGIC FOR YOUNGSTERS By Bert Easley

Includes also the full text of Eric P. Wilson's classic, THE ART OF CONJURING TO CHILDREN. 128 pp. Cloth.

Price 25/-Postage 8d.

DIA VERNON

BOOK

By Lewis Ganson

No need to extol the virtues of this great work.

Price 45/-Postage 1/4

PLAYING CARDS

HISTORY AND SECRETS

OF THE PACK

By W. Gurney Benham

196 pp. Dozens of beautifully coloured illustrations. A few only, in mint condition!

Price 35/-Postage 1/4

AFTER-DINNER

SCIENCE

By Kenneth Swezey

Hundreds of '-science tricks' to perform at the dinner table. 182 pp. Cloth bound, masses of photographs.

Price 16/-Fostage INEFFECTIVE CARD MAGIC By Bill Simon

A cloth-bound book of 182 pages of first-rate card magic by one of America's top card men.

Price 47/-Postage 1/-

GRAND

DECEPTIONS

By Alexander Klein

The World's most spectacular hoaxes, impostures, ruses and frauds. Fascinating!

Price 21/-Postage 1/1

ENCYCLOPEDIA

OF CIGARETTE TRICKS

By Keith Clark

The only worth-while book on this subject. 304 pp. Fine cloth-bound book.

Price 52/6 Postage 1/2

MODERN

HANDCUFF SECRETS

FOR MAGICIANS

By Dick Norman

Everything you need to know about escaping from handcuffs. 112 pp. Board covers.

Price 60/-Postage 6d.

NICK'S

TABLE TRIX

By Nick Trost

A well illustrated manuscript publication of tricks for the card table and the author's fine Ring and Rope Routine.

Price 7/-Postage 3d.

^ Write for our full Book List containing hundreds of Titles ^

THE MAGIC WANH PUBLISHING COMPANY

62 WELLINGTON ROAD, ENFIELD, MIDDLESEX

The Magic Circle

President: Herbert J. Collings, Esq. Vice-President: Francis White, Esq.

Clubroom and Library and Museum: Hearts of Oak Buildings, Euston Road, London, N.W.I.

Magical Theatre '

King George's Hall, W.C.

Summer Recess

Particulars trom Hon. Secretary :

Peter New.combe 38 Overdale Avenue New Maiden, Surrey

PETER WARLOCK'S

PENTAGRAM

is published on the 24th of each month and can be obtained direct from the publishers for 1'7 per single copy. Annual Subscription 18/-post free.

PUBLISHED BY:

The Magic Wand Publishing Co. 62 Wellington Road, Enfield Middlesex

Manuscripts for publication and books for review should be sent to the:

EDITORIAL ADDRESS:

Peter Warlock, 24, Wordsworth Rd., Wallington, Surrey.

JACK HUGHES

will be pleased to send you full details of

THE DE LUXE "SU-TABLB"

together with all his other effects in return for a stamp.

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PREDICTED MENTAL SPELL

EDWARD MARLO

EFFECT: Magician successfully predicts the outcome of a mental spelling process.

Above effect is based on ideas using the Mos-tellur spelling system from the Phoenix issue No. 58 of April, 1944, and that of Ed Mario's SECOND PRESENTATION from Hugard's Magic Monthly for January, 1956. While not actually using the Mosteller count spell principle it does utilize the two card deal during the spelling process.

1. The set-up of 12 cards, from top down, is as follows: The A-6-9-J of Clubs, the 4 and K of Hearts, the 8 and Q of Spades, the 4-5-7-Q of Diamonds. On first glance it would appear obvious that u.iybody could spot such a set-up; however, the handling is such that it will not be seen in the above order during the performance of the effect. At the same time the stock is such as to be easily remembered thus making it a simple process to re-set as per the procedure in the performance of the effect.

2. The Gimmick—This consists of a playing card folded in half, then slit on both sides, about half-inch from the top across its width but not entirely across but rather of sufficient length so that later three billets, on each side, can be inserted ino the slits. The billets are originally 2in. by l^in. then later folded into a lengthwise or rectangular strip of one inch by three eighths. The billets are inserted into the slits, three in each side, then the card is stapled on both sides so as to give tension or grip to the billets it is supposed to hold. The Fig. 1 shows the gimmick completed.

3. On the six billets you write the following sentence. " You will think of the ——," then fill in the names of the following cards on each— 6C-JC-KH-QS-5D-QD. In the Fig. 1 is seen the order of the first three billets and the remaining three billets are folded and, of course, on the other side of the gimmick. All you need to remember is 6-J-K-Q-5-Q and disregard suits except perhaps in the case of the Queens you would make a mental picture of which is which but this is not any real problem.

4. A pen or pencil should be one of the props plus some extra billets, folded as the ones in the gimmick, in the left coat pocket. The gimmick itself can be in the right coat pocket or trouser pocket preferably. The deck should have the 12 card set-up on top of deck also the bottom card of deck is crimped. With deck in case and all props handy you are ready to perform as you face audience.

5. Remove deck from case and give it an overhand shuffle as follows. Undercut half the deck and in drawing off: the first cards you also draw off the bottom crimped card with the result as the shuffle is continued fairly your stock is already marked off by the crimped card above same. Finish by cutting at crimped card to bring it to bottom of deck and stock again is on top.

6. Say, " I'm going to give you some of these shuffled cards and I want you to further shuffle them." Here you thumb over the top 12 cards and hand them to spectator for shuffling. Place rest of deck on to table.

7. While spectator is shuffling the cards you remove paper and pencil, then state you will write a prediction on the billet. Open up the billet and write, " You and I will think of he same card." Fold billet, then place it to your left. The pencil is left on the table to your right.

VOLUME 11, No. 12 - 1/6. (20 Cents) - SEPTEMBER 1957

8. After spectator has sufficiently mixed the cards you tell him to fan the cards in front of his eyes and to think of any one of them, then he is to close up the cards and shuffle them again.

9. While spectator is following your instruction in Step 8 you casually pick up deck and run nine cards from top to bottom of deck thus bringing crimped card tenth from the bottom. Place deck back on to table.

10. Take the packet of 12 cards from spectator and say, " I will also think of one of these cards." Here you seem to be deciding as to which card you want to think of but instead you are actually re-setting the cards back into their original order. This is very easy as the suits run in C-H-S-D order and each set is arranged to run numerically higher; therefore, clubs is A-6-9-J, Hearts is 4-K-, Spades 8-Q, Diamonds is 4-5-7-Q. Once you have reset the cards you give the packet a false shuffle to retain the order. The following shuffle is convincing and easy—Run 3 and throw— Run 3 and throw—Run 6 and throw—Run 3 and throw—Run 3 and throw—Run 6 and throw—the cards are back in original order. Just remember the whole as 3-3-6-3-3-6 and you'll have no trouble.

11. Drop the packet on top of the deck, then have spectator cut deck. You say, " Just once more," and at same time reach over and cut at crimp to bring it to the bottom on completion of cut. Nine cards are now above the stock of original 12 cards.

12. Pick up deck and tell spectator you will deal off a card at a time from top of deck and that as you do so he is to spell the name of his thought of cards mentally. Each card you drop, of course, will represent a letter of the card and he is to stop you when he mentally reaches the last letter S of his card.

13. You are holding deck face down in left hand as for dealing. The right forefinger lifts off top card at inner right corner in the familiar double lift method except here only a single card is taken. The card is carried to the table and resting its face against the table the right thumb presses downwards on the card as the right forefinger moves upwards slightly with the result that the corner of the card seems to snap off the tip of right forefinger. This action is important for all cards as will be seen.

14. Continue taking single cards off the deck in the above manner until you have taken off nine. Every time you take off a card from here on has to be two cards taken as one until spectator calls stop! Of course, he might call ' Stop' after the first nine cards if he had thought of either the A or 6 of Clubs; however, from this point on you will have to deal off two cards as one until he calls a halt.

15. As you go along you also keep the count so that you will know exactly what set or pair of cards have to be on top. Needless to mention that the sets spell with 10-11-12-13-14-15 letters. Sets that spell with 10 and 11 letters are all club cards, the 12 letter cards are the 4-K of Hearts, the 13 letter cards are 8-Q of Spades while the 14-15 letter cards are all diamonds. You will find how easy it becomes to remember not only which set you have been stopped at but also which card of the two is actually the top one because of each set the under or second card is higher in value than the top one. As an example suppose spectator stopped you as you reached the count of 14. You know that set 14 and 15 are diamond cards so 14 is a diamond pair, the first pair, also they run in numerical sequence of 4-5-7-Q; therefore 14 is 4 and 5 of diamonds with the 4D being the top card. It is not at all complicated once you grasp the idea.

16. For sake of getting to rest of the effect let us assume you have been stopped at the twelfth count. You know this is the Heart pair and that 4H is top card. Hand the deck to spectator and say, " I'm thinking of a card and you are thinking of a card. You do not know what card I'm thinking of but I will tell you. I'm thinking of the Four of Hearts—What card are you thinking of?"

17. Now if spectator gasps out, " That's the card I was thinking of—the Four of Hearts," then you have accomplished a miracle because all you do is tell him to turn over top card to reveal the Four of Hearts. Next remind him about the billet on which you wrote something before all this happened. Have him open the billet and read out, " You and I will think of the same card " for the climax of the effect.

18. If the spectator should say, " I thought of the King of Hearts," then you quickly say, " I thought of the Four of Hearts—would you please turn over the top card?" As spectator is busy turning top card you casually place right hand into trouser pocket and remove KH billet from holder. Finger palm billet, then remove your hand. During this you have instructed spectator to place aside your Four of Hearts and now you again ask him to name the card he is thinking of. After he repeats its name instruct him to turn over the top card of deck.

19. As attention is on spectator's card your left hand reaches for the tabled billet and in transferring to right hand does the UTILITY SWITCH so that right hand actually tosses the KH pellet on to table as you say, " On this slip of paper I wrote something before we began this experiment. Would you please open it and read it aloud. Spectator, of course, reads, " You will think of the King of Hearts." During this pick up pencil from table and replace in pocket also getting rid of palmed billet.

As one can see the effect is short and to the point, it is the little details that take time to describe. To follow are several other thoughts on the PREDICTED MENTAL SPELL.

SUGGESTION No. 1: 1. Instead of using the deck, only the twelve card packet can be used. In this case the whole procedure is exactly identical up to the point where the performer is apparently going to think of a card.

2. At this point the cards are re-set but the four club cards are brought to the bottom of the packet. This is so that now you can give an illustration of how when you place a card from top to bottom he is to spell his card and stop you only after you have placed a card on the bottom of packet for the letter 5" in his spelling.

3. To clarify the thing for him you demonstrate by saying, " Suppose you thought of the Two of Clubs you would spell a letter for each card I place on the bottom. Transfer three cards, one at a time, spelling T-W-O, then stop and say, " That would be for the two." Continue by saying don't forget the ' of' as you transfer two cards for the letters O-F. Finish by spelling Clubs in the same manner and at the same time emphasise that he is to stop you only after the letter S has been placed to the bottom and not before.

4. Needless to say during this demonstration you are set to do the effect. Openly transfer one card at a time from top to bottom until 10 cards have been transferred but from this point on two cards as one are transferred from top to bottom until told to stop.

5. Needless to say the effect is concluded as in the first instance.

An observation—I think that using the full deck for a mental spell is better than using a packet in that these packet affairs usually have the flavour of self-working automatic spellers. Anyway one should decide for himself which he feels is the better procedure for himself.

SUGGESTION No. 2: 1. In case one wants to dispense with the gimmick but retain the prediction of " We will both think of the same card " idea why then it is only necessary to go back to the original system of merely forcing a spectator to think of one of six cards that you show him slowly off the top of deck. Needless to say, these cards spell with 10-11-12-13-14-15 letters so as soon as you know the number you can name the card you thought of and later have the prediction read.

SUGGESTION No. 3: 1. Retaining the 12 card packet and prediction idea without the gimmick you could proceed as follows: After you re-set cards you write on the slip, " We will both think of the same card " but make it appear, but not conclusively, as if you are writing down your own card.

2, When it comes time to name your card you open billet and at same time say, " I thought of the *-" naming proper card. Conclude the effect but also point out that your thought and his thought were closely allied.

SUGGESTION No. 4: NOT WITH A PREDICTION. 1. The six card set automatic spell can be extended into nine cards providing you have the 7-8-9 cards to all spell with 15 letters. Also only 8 cards are placed above the set of cards. This means that instructions should be given not to stop the mental spell until the card on letter S joins those dealt on to table. You will then have to ask for the name of the card, then proceed by picking up either the deck proper or the tabled packet. Now the actual card can be shown on top by either a single or double turnover this depending on the position of the named card. You will readily get the idea of the process involved if with an 8 card stock over the set-up the spectator should stop you on a 15 letter card. This means four 15 letter possibilities distributed 2 and 2 on each section of deck.

SUGGESTION No. 5: Again not with Prediction. 1. In this case the deck can be shuffled, a card thought of but it has to be named before spelling to it; however, it is interesting in principle as one will see.

2. Deck having been shuffled you must force spectator's mental choice to one of three cards. This can be done as you show him top three cards quickly, then slow up and say, " Too Fast." Now show next three slowly, etc. At any rate each time restricting his choice to among three cards.

3. Once you know which set of three he made his mental choice from you shuffle enough cards on top to make the first card of the three as the twelfth one down.

4. Ask for spectator to name his card. No matter what his card is you must assume it is the first one of the set of three possibilities. Now you add or subtract the necessary number of cards so as to bring that first card to come out on the letter S.

5. Let us suppose he said his card is the Seven of Hearts a 13 letter card. Set that first card so it will be the thirteenth card.

6. Now spell the cards dealing them face up as you do so. If the 7H shows up on the last letter S you have done all right.

7. If it does not show up on the letter S you look up and ask what was the card at same time do a double turnover of the top two cards of the deck. If the 7H shows you are O.K. If it doesn't, turn it face down, then take top card and say, " I forgot to do this " as you snap card. Turn it face up and it has to be the 7H if your restrictions to a mental choice of three cards has been correct. I call this also a good "ESTIMATION OUT." Have used it since 1948.

EXTENDED MENTAL SPELL

EDWARD

EFFECT: A card thought of is spelled to mentally and on last letter performer is stopped.

Card is named and performer shows correct mentally chosen card.

This is a further development of the Suggestion No. 4, extended spelling, from " Predicted Mental Spell."

1. Set-up.—A crimped card 9th from bottom of deck. In other words, 8 cards below the crimped card. On top of deck the following nine cards are arranged, from top down—

6C-KH-AC-8S-4H-7D-3D-QS-8D 123456789

2. To work.—Remove deck from case. Give it a couple of straight cuts finally cutting at crimp to bring crimp to the bottom. Now run off 8 cards in an overhand shuffle. This brings deck back to original set-up as in the Step 1 above.

3. Show the top nine cards to a spectator asking him to think of one. You can show him the cards one at a time or take off all nine, fan them, tell spectator to take his time. This last is good for those who may know something of spelling effects.

4. Return the nine cards to top. Get a break under top card and Double Under-cut it to the bottom. Next overhand shuffle as follows—Run 2 and throw—Run 2 and throw—Run 3 and throw. Now give it a couple of straight cuts finally cutting crimped card to the bottom.

MARLO

5. You are now set to spell out the spectator's mentally selected card but you must remember that the card he stops you at—the last letter S —this card is always tossed on to the dealt off packet before you ask for the name of the card.

6. Here is the procedure.—All you do is count the cards as he mentally spells. If he stops you at the tenth card you naturally toss it on to the tabled packet. Pick up the tabled packet as this has the two possibilities in clubs. Also remember that the top card of the dealt packet is always the lowest in value of the particular set. In the case of the 10 count the one, or ace, is top card of packet but if he names 6C you do a Double Turnover.

7. If the count is 12 when stopped the top card of dealt packet will be 4H followed by KH so proceed as in the case of Clubs.

8. If the count is 13 hold the deck in your hand because 8S will be on top of dealt card but the QS will be top card of deck. In this case you will note no double lift is necessary in either case.

9. If the count is 15 again hold the deck. If 3D is named it is top card of dealt packet. If 7D is called it is top card of deck but for the QD you do a Double Turnover.

10. A few trials will show how easy it is to remember the sets and how they lie. It becomes an easy matter to disclose the mentally selected card.

BEHIND THE SCREEN

PETER WARLOCK

IN THE effect "Two Person Simplicity Prediction " I mentioned the need for having some other item or items in which it was seemingly necessary for the medium to be isolated behind a screen. The effect to be described is one of them.

The medium is first seated on a chair behind the screen.

A spectator from the audience is invited to assist and when he reaches the stage he is seated on the chair B (see diagram of stage layout). In this position he is well isolated from the medium. Two packs of E.S.P. cards are introduced. (Each carries five patterns repeated five times.) One is handed to the medium behind the screen, whilst the other, after the faces have been shown, is ribbon-spread face downwards on the table in front of the assisting spectator.

On a small table to the right (performer's) of the screen is a small perspex (lucite) stand.

The spectator is asked to look at the spread and to fix his mind on the back of one card. " In a moment I want you to withdraw that card, but before you do so, my assistant will hand me one from the pack she is holding." The performer places his hand round the screen and comes back with a card held by his fingertips. The face of this card is not shown and it is placed back outwards at one end of the perspex stand. " Now sir," to the spectator ..." just push the card you have in mind out of spread." The spectator does so and the performer picks up the card and without showing its face places it back outwards on the stand on top of the medium's card. This process is repeated with four more cards, so that there are five pairs of cards on the stand. The climax arrives when the performer turns the cards round and shows that each is a matched pair!

The Requirements

The requisites are very simple, just two packs of E.S.P. (or similar patterened cards) cards, and a perspex stand.

One pack of cards is now roughened on the faces. From the other pack five cards are removed and these are roughened on their backs. Supposing that these five cards constitute two crosses, wavy lines, a square and a pentacle, take five similar cards from the pack and pair the sets so that the roughened back of each pair is outermost. These ten cards are then placed on top of the pack from which they have been removed. Place a rubber band around each pack and put them together with the stand on the table at the right of the screen.

The Presentation

The spectator from the audience being forthcoming he is seated in chair B. Before this, of course, the medium has been placed behind the screen.

Say that you wish to show how thought can be anticipated and that for the experiment you will use two packs of patterened cards. With this you hand him the pack in which all the faces of the cards have been roughened whilst the other is handed to the medium. Come back to the specta tor, take the pack from him, remove the rubber band and call attention to the fact that the pack contains a number of patterns each of which is repeated a number of times. Don't say how many patterns or how many times each is repeated.

Spread the cards face down on the table in front of him. Tell him that you wish him to think of one card, but before he discloses his selection you will take one from the medium. At this point your hand goes behind the screen and the medium hands you the two topmost cards of the pack which you take and handle as one. Then, without showing the face of the card (?) places it (?) at one end of the stand.

The spectator is now asked to push the card of his choice out of the spread. He does so and taking it at the fingertips, but not allowing either assistant or audience a chance of glimpsing its face, you place it on top of the two cards handed out by the medium.

This process is similarly continued until five cards have been dealt with. The first set of cards is taken with the right hand, squared with the left, and then turned over faces to the audiences. The cards are then separated and because of the roughing on the face of the spectator's card and the roughing on the back of the pair handed out by the medium only two cards are seen and these match. The process is continued with the four remaining sets.

SMALL, MEDIUM AND LARGE

PETER WARLOCK

ON THE performer's table three envelopes are displayed. One is normal business size, the second is slightly larger than a Jumbo pack. The third is very large indeed. Close by is a pack of cards and a glass containing a number of folded slips of paper.

The performer speaks of the power of prophecy and draws attention to the three envelopes. The pack of cards is then picked up, and cutting off a few of the cards he hands them to a spectator whom we shall designate as A, with a request that he merely thinks of one. The remainder of the pack is handed to another spectator, B, who is asked to shuffle the cards and then request his neighbour to take one, look at it and remember it.

With his left hand the performer picks up the glass from the table, whilst the right reaches inside and removes about a dozen slips and distributes them a few at a time to members of the audience, asking them to unfold them and note that each bears a different name of a town or city. When they have done this they are asked to re-fold their papers and drop them back into the glass, at the same time the performer mentions that in all there are over two hundred slips each bearing a different name. With one hand held over the top the glass is given a shake and then removing the hand, a third spectator, C, is asked to withdraw one of the slips, to open it and note the name on it.

With these chores out of the way the performer picks up the theme of prophecy . . . how three choices have been made ... the first person one card from say half-a-dozen ... the second person with a choice from the remainder of the pack . . . and finally one town or city from many hundreds.

Turning to A, the performer asks him to name the card in his mind and then slitting open the small envelope he removes a similar card; the first prophecy is correct. B is asked to name his card and taking the second sized envelope and slitting it open a Jumbo pack is removed. It is fanned and it is seen that the card selected by B is the only one reversed in the pack. Finally C is asked the name of the town or city that he has in his mind. Supposing that the answer is Norwich, the third envelope is opened and from it is taken a large folded map, which when unfolded bears a caption * YOU WILL SELECT ' in large letters at the top of the sheet and running from it a slender length of red ribbon the end of which is stuck to the sheet and arranged so that it encircles the city of Norwich.

The Requirements

1. A pack of Jumbo cards together with ordinary size pack as described in " Taped Slates."

2. A pint size changing glass as described in " Tele-Coincido."

3. A large map of the British Isles.

4. Six playing cards with similar back pattern to the ordinary size pack. Supposing they are: —

Six of hearts, Ace of Clubs, Queen of hearts,

Jack of diamonds, Nine of spades, seven of spades.

5. You will then require three double faced cards of the following values: —

Six of hearts—Ace of clubs

Queen of hearts—Jack of diamonds

Nine of hearts—seven of spades.

6. A specially constructed envelope, details of which appeared in Jinx 15. The letterpress describing it is as follows. The illustrations should make it quite clear: —

Place three letter envelopes before you and a pair of sharp pointed scissors. Envelope No. 1 is untouched but the sides and bottoms of envelopes 2 and 3 are trimmed so that only the address side remains. Place these two pieces in front of you and apply adhesive at those parts which are shown shaded. Where the dotted line is shown this means adhesive on the underside.

Into envelope 1 place the first double faced card. Now place 2 on top of 3 and between these two place the second double facer. Two and 3 are then inserted into the envelope 1 and the whole assembly is allowed to dry under pressure. When dry you have what in appearance is an ordinary envelope, but actually one having two secret com partments. The third double facer is placed in the envelope proper and the flap is turned over and sealed down. Two points of mention. The first is that you must be certain of the positions of the cards inside, and secondly that none of the adhesive gets on to the cards. Now that the envelope is sealed, consider the position.

If the left-hand end is trimmed to the depth of one eighth of an inch only the first double facer can be allowed to slide out. Cutting the right-hand side in a similar manner means the exodus of the second card, whilst for the third, slit the top and only the third card can escape.

1. You will require a larger envelope to hold the Jumbo pack and an even larger one for the folded map.

The Preparation

Part of this has already been dealt with in detailing the method of making the faked envelope. The rest resolves itself into the following:—

You will require about 150 slips of paper measur -ing two inches by one. On 75 write the names of different towns and cities of the British Isles. Fold each slip first widthwise and then lengthwise. On the remaining 75 slips write the word 'Norwich.' These slips are similarly folded. One set of slips goes in one side of the changing glass, whilst the others go in the other side.

On the map of the British Isles, paste a piece of white paper and on it paint with a blush ' YOU WILL SELECT.' Now take a length of narrow red ribbon and some sellotape. By means of the latter fasten one end of the ribbon to the map under the words, ' You will select' then running the ribbon down the map and with the end encircling the city of Norwich use an additional piece of sellotape and fix it in piace.

The jumbo pack suitably set up is placed inside the second sized envelope and the map is folded and placed in the largest envelope. The envelopes are placed in a row resting against something so that they can be seen easiiy. The pack of cards with the extra six on top is placed on the table alongside the changing glass.

The Presentation

Draw attention to the three envelopes.

Pick up the pack of cards, fan them and then run off the top half dozen, handing them to spectator A. Ask him to think of one card and then handing the remainder of the pack to B ask him to shuffle them and ask his neighbour to take one. When this has been done, retrieve the cards and place them in your right

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