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Mr. Warlock's description of a method by means of which milk can be changed to beer as it is poured out of a jug, explained in the May Pentagram, reminded me of an idea in one of my " Brainwave " notebooks of years ago. The identical principle is used in connection with a tumbler full of sand.

The Preparation consists of filling a tumbler with water and emptying it, and then pouring in some dark-coloured sand. When this is emptied out a thin layer will remain adhering to the sides of the tumbler, held on by the film of water. Again the tumbler is filled with sand of a contrasting colour, this going inside the sand " shell." On top is sprinkled a little more of the first coloured sand so that the main contents are completely hidden. By placing this prepared tumbler on the oven-top for a short time the moisture will be evaporated, leaving the sand absolutely dry. Supposing the " shell "

of sand to be blue and the main contents yellow, this tumbler is placed in a box of blue sand.

Presentation.—A duplicate tumbler is taken and some of the blue sand scooped up in it and allowed to trickle back into the box. In the act of filling it by the same method it is switched for the prepared tumbler in the familiar way, and stood on the table. The Coloured Sands and Water effect can now be presented ; after which the tumbler of (apparently) blue sand is taken, and the sand poured on to a large plate from some distance above so that the thin layer of blue sand is lost among the stream of yellow. The illusion of blue sand changing to yellow in full view is created. The necessity for evaporating all the moisture that held the blue sand to the inside of the glass will be realised, since any blue sand adhering to the side of the glass would give a clue to the trick.

tray was rested against the back of a chair, a book previously placed there preventing the former from sliding forward.

Preparation.—The only preparation, apart from placing the various articles on the table, is that a long length of fish line is run through the attachment on the weight in the manner of threading a needle and thus doubled through the hole at the side of the tube, through two small screw eyes fixed to the table one on the underside and one at the bottom of the leg and thence off-stage. To obtain the best effect an off-stage assistant is necessary. The conjurer, however, by anchoring the fish line to some stationary object could get the necessary pull and slack needed by pressing against it. If the conjurer decided to work single handed the removal of the line becomes a difficult task. The off-stage assistant has two ends of fish line in his hand. The purpose of this is that at the end of the effect one end is released and the whole of the fish line drawn in and off-stage thus leaving the tray free from any attachment.

Presentation and Working.—This should be fairly obvious. One end of the glass chimney is sealed in the manner of the drumhead tube. The large piece of paper is tightly rolled into a ball.

It must be so rolled that it will drop into the tube easily and not cling to the sides. The spectator caps the other end of the tube, the ball is shown to move easily and the conjurer then sets either end on the tray over the needle point so that the latter punctures the paper almost dead centre. If this cannot be done instinctively it is better to mark the tray in some way so that there is no hesitation in placing down the chimney. The assistant now by a slight pull on the fish line causes the wire to rise, bringing the ball on top of it. The fact that the wire is dull black and that the glass chimney reflects a great deal of light, makes the wire invisible at a few feet. The ball finally sinks, the spectator then being asked to pick up the tube and dismantle it. Because newspaper is used for capping the ends, the discovery of the puncture mark requires exceptionally close scrutiny. In nine cases out of ten the actual hole will penetrate a letter, thus giving one hundred per cent, concealment.

Those interested in this effect will have the opportunity of seeing it performed in a demonstration lecture that I shall be giving for the I.B.M. at Bournemouth.—P.W.

Manufacturing and selling rights retained by Peter Warlock.

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Perfect and indetectible palming-off of a card from the pack is an ability that continues to elude the average purveyor of card magic. Why this should be so is a vexed question, and to deal with it in full is quite beyond the scope of the space available here. Suffice to say that in this writer's opinion the main fault lies in the utter disregard of any attempt to coincide the action with even the simplest form of misdirection. Far too many indulge in what may be called a " sliding off" movement that looks more like a swimming instructor endeavouring to illustrate the intricacies of the side stroke. Blandly these offenders carry on, firmly convinced in their own minds that they are somewhat " bad hands " with a pack of cards, but succeeding only in fooling themselves and nobody else.

However, let us leave these mundane thoughts and carry on to the main purpose of this literary outburst which is to describe a slight evolution of the palm which I have devised and which may prove of use to all card exponents, especially those who find this sleight a difficult one. Personally, I have always used the palm described in C. Lang-neil's " The Modern Conjurer," accredited to Charles Bertram, and consider that it is quite impossible to improve upon it. However, one likes to ring the changes occasionally and I find the palm about to be described, provided the necessary practice is given it, to be clean-cut, indetectible and natural.

Assuming that the inevitable selected card has been replaced in the pack, then, controlled to the top, we proceed. The operator takes the pack so that it lies face up on the left hand, while he calls attention to the face and queries card as to whether it is the selected one. The end of the pack nearest operator is pressed firmly into the base of thumb and rear of palm by pressure of the second, third and fourth fingers at the front end of pack. First finger remains free but rests lightly on bottom front left hand corner of pack. Thumb takes no part in the proceedings as yet. Right hand, held palm up, now comes to within about a foot of the left hand but slightly lower. Left hand now readies itself to toss the pack into the right hand face down. Fore-finger of left hand presses on the front left hand corner of the top card of the pack and pulls slightly inwards which action buckles or curves the card in towards the palm (see Fig. i). Immediately the left hand turns almost completely over tossing the pack face down into right hand (see Fig. 2). If you have done this anywhere like correctly you will find the top card of the pack is retained in the left palm (see Fig. 3). Without any hesitation and in one continuous movement, the left hand follows up and takes the card now lying on top of the pack betwixt thumb and fore-finger to display the fact that it also is not the chosen card (see Figs. 4, 5, 6). From there on it's up to you. To sum up, I have tried to describe step by step as clearly as possible, a palm that is achieved cleanly under cover of the perfect and natural misdirection provided by the action of displaying the both top and bottom cards of the pack as not being the chosen one. Devote a little time to it and I feel sure you will find this a worthy addition to your store of secret sleights. I would add that this palm is a most useful asset in any of the numerous ambitious card routines, but, perhaps, you have already realised that! Good Palming 1 !

Peter Warlock's 66 MODES FOR MBHiTAUBSTS99

Number Three — " MIND OUT OF TIME . . From a blue-backed pack of cards three are taken and placed back towards audience, one in each of three glasses that stand on the table. A pack of red-backed cards is now taken and with their faces towards the audience the mentalist deats off one card at a time asking that a member of the audience stops him when he wishes. On the command " stop ! " the card that the mentalist is holding is placed in the nearest glass in front of the blue-backed card. Two more cards are selected in this manner and placed respectively in front of the other two blue-backed cards. Now comes the seemingly impossible climax. Each glass is turned round to show that in every case that the blue-backed card placed there by the mentalist matches the card selected from the face-up pack by the varying spectators in each case. Please bear in mind the following :— there is no force, no confederate, no rough or smooth principle, no sleight of hand, and finally, that the cards selected are from a face-up pack.

Peter Warlock's 66 MODES FOR MBHiTAUBSTS99

Number Three — " MIND OUT OF TIME . . From a blue-backed pack of cards three are taken and placed back towards audience, one in each of three glasses that stand on the table. A pack of red-backed cards is now taken and with their faces towards the audience the mentalist deats off one card at a time asking that a member of the audience stops him when he wishes. On the command " stop ! " the card that the mentalist is holding is placed in the nearest glass in front of the blue-backed card. Two more cards are selected in this manner and placed respectively in front of the other two blue-backed cards. Now comes the seemingly impossible climax. Each glass is turned round to show that in every case that the blue-backed card placed there by the mentalist matches the card selected from the face-up pack by the varying spectators in each case. Please bear in mind the following :— there is no force, no confederate, no rough or smooth principle, no sleight of hand, and finally, that the cards selected are from a face-up pack.

The price of the Routine with patter and notes on presentation is moderately price at Seven Shillings and Sixpence from : PETER WARLOCK, 65 MANOR ROAD, WALLINGTON, SURREY or any reliable dealer a Waul a&out iBeo&A . . .

44 YOUR DECK, YOUR CARD " by Kardyro (published by Conjurers' Library, U.S.A.) price One dollar.

This unpretentious but well printed booklet contains some ten effects and ideas. The reader is expected to have not only the knowledge of, but also ability in, handling a deck of cards in a competent manner. The main thing that strikes the reader is that the effects are straightforward and have entertainment value. We particularly liked " Welcome Stranger " wherein the author has not only struck a novel and useful improvement on a time old force, but has provided an effect that in the hands of a good magician can become a miracle. " Strange, very Strange " has an excellent mystery angle and requires little in the way of sleight of hand. Smoothness in presentation will make this an effect that should impress the most sceptical audience. The author gives yet another variation on " Follow the Leader," a variation that is good because whilst the handling of the cards is straightforward and four changes are carried out with ten cards in each heap, all the chicanery is accomplished before the operator starts the trick proper. These three mentioned effects struck us as being the best. The reader, however, who cares to purchase will find that every effect is practical and all have especial merit when close-quarter work is desired. The booklet is tastefully produced and at the very modest price of five shillings (if obtained from The Fleming Book Co., via Mr. Robeitson Keene) is a good bargain. 52 Points.

THE STEWART JAMES' CREATIONS (obtainable from Mr. Francis Haxton, " St. Anthony's," Nonsuch Walk, Cheam, Surrey).

Mr. Stewart James is making available a number of exclusive routines and effects. These are in duplicated manuscript form. The description and explanations are straight to the point.

This is a complete card act, the plot being that a famous card expert has explained to the performer the various subtle bits of chicanery which he detected on ten different nights in the card room of a famous gambling casino. He proposes to show his assembled audience a demonstration of the unbelievable control that is possible in games that apparently depend on chance. The routine is then commenced and consists of ten effects all of which are varied in nature. It is not necessary for the performer to use all the effects, but as they stand they form a perfect sequence both from a point of demonstration and also for handling. It is sufficient to say that the effects are not

REVIEWERS—continued from page 79

entally, I did not buy because of the rave reviews),

Victor Farelli writes :

" The only reviews, or reports, that have any real value in this respect are those that neither the author nor his publisher are ever likely to see : they are written in private letters from one magician to another. Such reviews, when favourable, do increase sales. Naturally, when the reports are unfavourable (and they often are !) they have the opposite effect.

" In the past, magical critics have usually treated my little books with more leniency than perhaps they deserve, and while I am gratified by the praise, and grateful to the reviewers, I do not think that their reports have helped my sales in any marked degree."

Both reviewers and publishers would do well to paste Mr. Farelli's words above their typewriters.

It is not my contention that the informed, conscientious reviewer does not perform a service.

only of a very high standard but, what is more, are also practically self-working, thus giving the performer abundant scope in his presentation. As the requirements are those which are to hand, the reader who wishes to present a trouble-free card act that is definitely different and entertaining has the opportunity of acquiring this one at the extremely small price of fifteen shillings. Recommended zvithout any reserve.

44 POKERICULUM " price 5/-.

We cannot think of any poker deal effect that could be more stunning, in its effect. The cards are dealt as for poker, each player receiving four cards. At this point the dealing is stopped, the performer remarking that should the other players think that the position of the cards might have been controlled in any way, the performer will change his hand with any other one of the players before dealing the fifth card. Even.with the dealing of the fifth card those taking part are given the option of changing this card for any other in the deck. This effect carries our full quota of marks.

."THE JAMESWAY POKER DEAL" price 5/-.

This is an exceptionally good and convincing method of card control for close-up demonstration, and though a certain amount of practice is required for an adequate performance, the reader will be well repaid by having a most useful weapon added to his card armoury. A supplement is issued so that in all, five effects are detailed. They are " Everybody Think ! " ; " One Feathered Bird " ; " Up the Ladder Deal " ; " The Five Ace Deal " ; and " Dealing any Hand Named." Again we give this full marks.

44 THE NEW LOOK "

In this we get away from the card room, and although the effect is one with cards it has a novel angle. One card in the pack is anchored to a silk ribbon. Two spectators look at this card. Before the ribbon is pulled by a third member of the audience the two spectators are asked to name the card they looked at. Each names a different card, whilst when this third spectator pulls the card clear it doesn't agree with the verdict of either of the first two spectators. Now just remember there is no sleight of hand or any underhand moves by the performer, there are no faked cards and the pack can be examined. It is completely self-working and an effect that is just as much off-trail as Stewart's brilliant " Miraskill."

Quite the contrary, his counsel is vitally needed. But he is far outnumbered by literary degenerates who have nothing to offer in the way of constructive criticism.

I think it was the late Ted Annemann who first suggested in an issue of his unique journal " The Jinx," that before an effect or book be recommended it s'hould pass the approval of a board of (was it seven ?) qualified reviewers. Such a plan as that outlined by Mr. Annemann, while not fool-proof, would be the magician's best guarantee that he is getting good value for his money.

But I must get back to my library. A new volume, " The Universal Supreme Encyclopedia of Tricks and Illusions with an Old Shoe," has just come in and the reviewers say it is " great, stupendous, terrific, marvellous, indescribable, remarkable, gigantic, wonderful, fascinating, astonishing, overwhelming, stunning, dazzling . . ."

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