Ion Jiaii Ued

" iDouMe-Siap^jeted "

The pack is separated into odds and evens instead of reds and blacks, the red kings are counted as even cards. The bottom 14 cards of the pack are stacked, the bottom 6 being even cards in a known order and the next 8 being odd cards in a known order.

The deck is arranged as follows :—Top 20 cards are even, then 18 odd cards, then AC, 3H, 5S, 7D, 9C, JH, KS, AS, 2C, 4H, 6S, 8D, 10C, QH; the QH being the bottom card of pack. You'll notice that the suits rotate C, H, S, D, and that the AS is out of sequence in the odd stacked portion; it serves as a marker, separating the odd stacked cards from the even stacked cards on the bottom. Crimp the bottom card (QH).

Two spectators are invited up. Charlier-shuffle the pack as you explain that no two people ihink alike, some think of things in an artistic manner, colours, designs, etc., while others think in a more mundane manner, figures, letters, etc. Study the two assistants; whenever you get two people, one will look more " arty " than the other. Tell the " arty " type that you get the impression that he will be able to concentrate more strongly on designs and tell the other that you think he'll be able to concentrate on numbers more easily than designs. The " arty " type we'll designate " A " and the other " B ".

Cut the pack once or twice, finally cutting the crimped card to the bottom. Lay pack on table. Ask "A " to cut off a small packet of about 8 or 10 cards from the top of pack and then a similar packet from bottom of pack. Point out that you couldn't know top or bottom cards of packet he holds (centre packet). Ask him to look at top card of his packet and to remember it, then to cut his packet as often as he wants to and to keep it just now.

"B" is now told that you couldn't possibly know top card of packet that was cut from bottom of the pack, he is asked to look at and to remember this card and then to pick up packets off the group which was cut off from top of pack and drop them on the packet in his hand, and then to drop the remaining cards on top of his packet. This done, you ask " B " to fan his packet in front of him and to remember the number that his card lies from the top of his packet. (The easiest way for him to do this is to have him fan the packet, faces to him; when he comes to his card he is to count it as " one ", then to keep on fanning towards the top of his packet, counting " two ", " three ", etc., until he gets to the top card of his packet.)

You now explain that "A" is to concentrate on his card and " B " is to concentrate on the number his card is from top of his packet. Take " A's " packet from him and explain that you're going to attempt to pick up " A's " thoughts and are going to remove his card, then you're going to try to pick up " B's " thoughts and are going to put " A's " card at the number " B " is thinking of.

Ask "A" to concentrate deeply on his card, fan the packet in your hand, find the first even card from the right-hand side (from face of deck), cut it to the face of the packet. Count the number of even cards and remember the lasl even card in the group and its number. This is

A's " card. Subtract its number in the fan from 20, add 1, and the resulting number h the number " B's " card lies in his packet. Pull up " A's " card and as you do so glance at the card that lies to its left (towards the top of the fan), this is the key card for " B's " card; i.e., if it is the 7D you know " B's " card is the 9C. Tell •" A " that you think that you've got his cars] and turn to " B ", asking him to concentrate on his number. Pull "A's" card out of the fao and insert it at appropriate number from top of your fan, i.e., if "B's" number is " 11 insert " A's " card at the 11th position from top of your fan, therefore under the 10th card from top of your fan. Do all this nice and slowly, giving yourself plenty of time to do a check on the key card for " B's" card, etc. You remember (1) " A s " card, (2) " B's " number, (3) " B's " card.

Hand the packet back to "A" and ask born spectators to deal cards simultaneously, one at a time, face down. They do so. You count with them as they deal and when they've dealt cards to the chosen number (i.e., " 11 ") you shout " Stop!". Turn to " B " and say, " You, sir, thought of the number ' 11 ', is that correct? " B " acknowledges this. You now turn to "A" and say, " And you, sir, thought' of the Queen of Spades (i.e.), is that correct?" " A " acknowledges this. "Well then", you continue, " will you please turn up your 11th card and see for yourself that I placed it in the correct position?" This is done. Now, you turn to " B " and say, " I was able to ' get ' your number much more easily than I expected, sir. I think that perhaps I might be able to carry the experiment further and attempt to name your card if you'll concentrate well. Would yoi:

GaCau% SenAe of the CaitiA

Way back in the dark days of 1943, whilst we were at a pre-OCTU camp, we glimpsed and were very much impressed by Walter Gibson's "91 Cent Miracle " that appeared in Phoenix No. 44. The fact that it needed a little memory work plus the need for converting U.S.A. currency into English currency may have put a number of English magicians off learning a remarkably fine effect. We have certainly never seen anyone present it. Here we have added something to the Gibson version (as the well-informed reader will see), and have also produced an easy mnemonic for cutting out any intensive memory work. Because of the tables that appear at the end, we implore you not to pass this over without reading thoroughly. Only too often we have regretted laziness in reading when at a later date someone has shown us a dilly of an effect that was just as easily available to ourselves. As the main principle of the effect is unaltered, let us quote Walter Gibson's own preamble to "91 Cent Miracle " :—

" Here is a feat of mental wizardry that probably has remote antecedents but was developed into something a dozen years ago by Jack Miller, the famous Giant Card King. Only recently our brain department heard of the Miller mystery and began working along similar lines."

Continuing, we will let Gibson describe the effect as he wrote it at the time :—

" Since three people are used and given personal instructions by the performer, we will call them " Tom ", " Dick " and " Harry " to keep the participants straight.

" You have three envelopes, each of a different colour, red, white and blue. These are laid on the table with five coins of different denominations, a penny, a nickel threepenny piece, a sixpence, a shilling and a half-crown (these are the English equivalents of the American coins mentioned). With your back turned, you tell each person to take an envelope at random or by agreement among themselves, and then the fun begins.

" Speaking to Tom, the first man, you tell him that if he took the red envelope he is to put the penny in it. If he took the white, he is to put in the 3d. piece. If'he took the blue, he is to put in the sixpence. The envelope then goes into his pocket.

" With your back still turned, as it remains until the very end of the trick, you give Dick, the second man, certain choices as to coins according to the colour of his envelope. These are named in the accompanying chart (see post) and the fact that Dick has options begins to make the trick intriguing.

" You go along to Harry, the third man, and give choices too, a pair for each envelope, as stated in the chart. Ihen for a pay off, you- toss an extra choice to Tom, the second man. You say, ' By the way, Tom, if you picked up the sixpence, you can put it back and take the half-crown instead, provided the half-crown is still t'.ere. But you can keep the sixpence if you want, that is up to you '. With all the envelopes in the pockets of the participants, and a coin in evety envelope, you turn around for the first time, pick up the two coins remaining on the table and, after due concentration, you name the colour held by each man, and the particular coin ihat his envelope contains."

From that point Gibson goes into the explanation, a thing we shall come to in a moment or two. However, there was one thing that from our own point of view slightly weakened this very fine effect, and that was that there was a physical connection between the performer and the two coins left over! With this idea in mind we devised a presentation to overcome this weakness.

In commencing the effect, the magician emphasises the connection of colour and metal, of how there is an unconscious link between the two and how a person wth supernormal attributes can see the connecton. The three envelopes and the coins are then placed on the table, and the assistance of three members of the audience requested. At this point, the magician mentions that in order to help his sixth sense, he will deprive himself of one of his normal senses, the sense of sight. As he says this he removes a handkerchief from his pocket, folds it and has it tied round his head to form a blindfold. He then turns his back on the three persons and from that point carries on giving instructions as in the Gibson description. When the transactions have been completed, however, he requests another member of the audience to pick up the two remaining coins and take them as far as possible from the table. " I do not ", says the magician, " want them to interfere with the experiment ". Turning round, the magician asks any one of the holders of the envelopes to step up, to place one hand on the envelope in his pocket and one hand on the magician's hand. He is then told the colour of the envelope he holds and also the denomination of the coin inside the envelope

This is repeated with the remaining two assistants, after which the blindfold is removed.

I think the reader will agree that this presentation makes the effect very strong indeed.

First of all the requirements; they are simple, consisting of three coloured envelopes, a penny, a nickel threepenny piece, a sixpence, a shilling and a half-crown. A handkerchief for blindfolding will also t>e required.

Let us now go through the presentation bit by bit. The three members of the audience are invited to assist, and with his table in front of him, the magician lines them up on his right. The envelopes and the coins are now placed in a row on the table. Whilst he is doing this and his head is bent down, the appearance of the shoes of the two nearest assistants (they will be No. 1 and 2) are particularly noted. Look also at the third man's shoes, and should there be strong similarity with the other two note some distinguishing feature that can be noted by a downward glimpse when apparently blindfolded. You mention the affinity between colour and metals and nominate your helpers respectively 1, 2 and 3. The handkerchief is then taken (and please do not say this is being used in order that you will not be able to see! Directly such a statement is made it puts an audience on its guard), folded, and you are apparently blindfolded. Assuring yourself of a good downward glimpse, move backward diagonally about „. a yard away from the table and turn your back to the assistants and the audience.

Address No. 1 first, asking him to choose any one of the envelopes on the table, or if the assistants wish, let them arrange the three envelopes among themselves. Whatever is done, the magician gives No. 1 the following instruction, and! at the same time warns him and the other assistants to carry out the instructions (which incidentally will have to be memorised) as noiselessly as possible :—

If you have the RED envelope, place inside it the penny.

If you have the WHITE envelope, place inside it the 3d. piece. If you have the BLUE envelope, place inside it the sixpence.

This assistant is then requested to place his envelope in his pocket and the second assistant is asked to take his envelope and choose a coin in this manner :—

If you have the RED envelope, take the sixpence or 2/6.

If you have the WHITE envelope, take the coin of the lowest value. If you have the BLUE envelope, take the penny or the sixpence.

He, too, is requested to place his envelope in his pocket, and No. 3 is invited to step forward. His instructions are :—

If you have the RED envelope, choose the 3d.

or the half-crown. If you have the WHITE envelope, choose the 6d.

or the shilling. If you have the BLUE envelope, choose the 3d. or shilling.

When he has pocketed his envelope, the second man is asked whether he would like another choice. He is told that if he picked up the sixpence he can, if he wishes, put it back and take the half-crown instead, providing that coin is still there. (Ed. Note.—Actually, we think this can be omitted, for if the coins are changed, such a change cannot be performed inaudibly and thus the audience may think that such a procedure might afford a clue to the magician. The only time it would pay, to our way of thinking, might be when after being given this choice some smart Alec pretends to change the coins. At the end of the effect he would receive quite a surprise.)

At this point the participants are requested to sit down. The magician still has his back to the audience, but with the words, " Perhaps another member of the audience would pick up the remaining coins and remove them, etc." he makes a half turn, a slight gesture with his hand. Slight as this movement is, he is so placed that without actually facing the table he can see the remaining two coins on the table top. It is these two coins that tell him which assistant has which envelope and also which coin.

The following list makes this quite plain :—

Gibson suggests that by sheer willpower one learns this list. Quite frankly, our memory needs some jogging and therefore we devised the following easy mnemonic. Instead of thinking of the coins as coins, they are added together, the total number of pence in each case linking up the holders of coins and envelopes. Thus were the 3d. piece and the half-crown left on the table, the total number of pence represented would be 33, and so the performer would think of the representative mnemonic for this number, ' Mummy and link it up with the words following and which in themselves give the key. So ' Mummy R (for red) e P (for penny) roves B (for blue) er T (for sixpence)- 's W (for white) i S (for shilling) ecracking '.

The coins are picked up and when this is ascertained by the performer he turns round, still blindfolded, to face his audience. He asks any one of the assistants to step up, place one hand on the envelope m his pocket, and give the performer the other. Glimpsing down the blindfold, the shoes, etc., of the assistant are noted.

If it is assistant No. 2, the magician knows that he has the 6d. in the blue envelope. He is told this and dismissed. The second assistant is similarly dealt with. Coming to the third assistant, the magician remarks, " Obviously you have the envelope, equally it is obvious that I cannot with any certainty know the coin it contains. Place your hand in your pocket, let the coin slip out of the envelope and throw the latter on one side. This time let me try and find the nature of this coin without contact . . . just think of it, please, etc." Finally and without any hesitation the coin is named.

To some, the idea of identification under the blindfold may not appeal. All right, just ask the assistants to step up in their original order. Finally, we sincerely hope that you will give the effect a thorough trial, for we feel certain that you will be more than pleased with the results.

Facts revealed by the knowledge of remaining coins

Penny and 3d.

(1)

6d.

in

blue

(2)

2/6

in

red

(3)

1 /"

in

white

Penny and 6d.

(1)

3d.

in

white

(2)

2/6

in

red

(3)

V-

in

blue

Penny and shilling

(1)

3d.

in

white

(2)

6d.

in

blue

(3)

2/6

in

red

Penny and 2/6

(1)

3d.

in

white

(2)

6d.

in

red

(3)

1/-

in

blue

3d. and 6d

(1)

Id.

in

red

i2)

2/6

in

blue

(3)

1/-

in

white

3d. and shilling

(1) (1)

6d.

in

blue

(2)

Id.

in

white

(3)

2/6

in

red

3d. and 2/6

Id.

in

red

(2)

6d.

in

blue

(3)

1/-

in

white

Sixpence and shilling

(1)

3d.

in

white

(2)

Id.

in

blue

(3)

2/6

in

red

Sixpence and 2/6

(1)

Id.

in

red

(2)

3d.

in

white

(3)

1/-

in

blue

Shilling and 2/6

(1)

6d.

in

blue

(2)

Id.

in

white

(3)

3d.

in

reel

P Stands for Penny, N for Nickel 3d. piece, T for Sixpence, S for shilling and M. for half-crown R represents red envelope, W the white envelope and B the blue envelope

Number of pence in air.ount left nn table 4 7 13 31 9 15 33 18 36 42

Mnemonic for such number ARROW TEA LAMB MOLE KEY LOAF MUMMY LATCH MOB RAIN

The First Man

Envelope ! B) ca (W) i (W) i (W) i (R) e (B) e (R) e (W) a iR) o (B) ea

Coin (T) s IK) s (N) s (N) s (1- ) laces IT) tcr (P) roves (N) ted (P) « (T) s

The Second Man

Envelope (R) a (R) u (B) ea (R) o (B) ir (W) rap (B) er (B) ye-(W) i (W) hi

Coin

(M) paging <M) (T) « (T) ttr ÎM) ingham (P) ing ÎT) 's (P) ass (N) ton (P) s

The Third Man

Envelooe fW) a (B) e (R) a (B) oa <\V) hi I R I e (VYj i (R) e fB) il (R; u

(S) ps (S) ted (M) fS) ts tS) tie (M) oved (S) eerack (M) oved (S) (NÏ

Navigate The Astral Plane

Navigate The Astral Plane

Live Your Fantasies Discover How The Master Astral Navigator Perform Astral Projection To Live Their Desired Realities! Finally You Can Fully Equip Yourself With These Must Have Super Tools For Astral Projection Success! In this world full of uncertainty, Wars, economic crisises, killing, rape and robbery, it's difficult for one to lead a calm and peaceful life. Sometimes, the unnervingness of it all can lead to disease and complications which harm our health.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment