Awful Art And Breathless Brainwaves Hubert Leslie

" SLEIGHTLY SENSATIONAL " by Bill Simon (Published by Louis Tannen, price 14/-)

Those who read Simon's excellent book Effective Card Magic know that here is one card man who can give a new plot or a new twist to an old plot that makes the reading of his effects worthwhile.

In the present little book of some forty pages there are ^ome ten card effects and a bonus of three miscellaneous items. There is also a short chapter entitled " In General" which contains a wealth of commonsense advice and from which we took some quotations for the previous issue of the " Pentagram."

Of the card effects that Mr. Simon describes we like best, " The Transposition " (an effect with dice as well as cards), the " Four Packet Shuffle " which is a very straightforward version of Vernon's " Triumph," and the " Vital Prediction." This last named is based on an idea of Curry's and a number of versions with variations appeared in the previous volume of this bulletin. The " Miscellaneons" section covers a sponge ball routine, a version of the ring on wand (or pencil) and a silver and copper transposition. All the effects show that the writer is a lover of good magic. We have always found that any individualist leaves his fingerprints on any effect he touches. Mr. Simon's is that of what some might think is the unnecessary replacing cards back on top of the pack and then either turning them over or taking them off. Well printed and with adequate illustrations we consider the book excellent value.

" MOHAMMED BEY'S ROUTINE WITH THE OKITO COIN BOX" by S. Leo Horowitz (Mohammed Bey) Published by Holden's Magic Shop and sold complete with box and all necessaries for 21/-

This is an item that all magicians who like a blend of subtelty and skill will revel in. Mr. Horowitz as his basis has taken the original Okito Coin Box, (which was, and in this version is quite a simple brass circular box) and around it has woven a web of some seven delightful mysteries. In the main they are penetrations, but there is a transposition which we let Jack Avis perform for us that is close quarter magic at its best. There is also a delightful payoff at the conclusion of the routine where the box is opened and inside is a little latex rabbit. Magicians will like the subtle manner in which the general awkwardness of the turnover of the box is eliminated and subtelty and little else achieves the desired result.

This is a must for those who wish to add to their close-up repertoire.

" PEN-I-PIN" by John Derris (Marketed by John Derris, price 6/-)

You'll remember that some time back John Derris marketed a very popular item called "Trilogy." This time he has come up with a miracle penetration of an examined coin which takes the following shape. The performer removes from his pocket a parcel just large enough to hold a coin. Through various parts of the parcel coloured headed pins are stuck. Everything is shown quite fairly and the pins are slowly withdrawn. The parcel is opened and shown that its contents consist of a penny which is immediately handed out for examination. Very effective and recommended.

"POKER CHIP CHICANERY" by Al Koran and Jack Avis, price 5/-

This again is a close-up effect off the beaten track. Five coloured poker chips are tipped out of a small metal box and wrapped in a small piece of tissue which is then handed to a spectator to hold. One colour is chosen and presto ! the spectator opens the paper and finds that he only has four chips, the one of the chosen colour being missing. The box is then opened and it is found that the straggler has returned. Again very effective and recommended.

"A MAGICIAN GOES TO DINNER" by Eddie Joseph (Published by Max Andrews, price 7/6)

This is a booklet of some twenty pages touching on a field that has been much neglected. It deals with tricks of an extempore nature performed at the table by a diner. Devant devoted a chapter to this in one of his books and and so too has Martin Gardner. In all there are a score of effects making use of the things one would expect to find on or about the table or the diners . . . fruit, cigarettes, a bottle, rings, coins etc. The handling in every case sounds most deceptive and there is one item with an empty bottle that has held spirits that sounds a dilly. We would say that every magician who wishes to increase his repertoire of impromptu tricks would well profit by purchasing this very moderately priced booklet.

Davenports. From these our good friends we have received many lists which include some attractive items. There's a " Demon " ultra clip board which sounds a must for any mentalist at a modest price of 10/-, whilst Dr. Jak's " Multiball"' and " Four Blacks" effects are throwaways at 5/- each.

MAGIC-GO-ROUND

OUR OWN little world of magic has become poorer with the death of our friend and neighbour, Sam Hiddleston. A man who saw good in every conjurer, and from whom, even some of the viler concoctions of King George's Hali would simply evoke the words, " It wasn't so good " will be missed by the many who had the privilege of knowing him. His great interest was in the collecting of playing cards, and over the course of several years he had amassed some fine specimens which he exhibited on a number of occasions at various functions.

ful Viennese present some of his effects at a party given by Henk. For our extra delight he showed us a genuine Hofzinser item.

It is not our job to give details ahead of normal release regarding society activities unless specially asked, but we can say, speaking in generalities, that the layout for this years British Ring Convention should make it the best ever. The establishment of a Headquarter Hotel, which experience has proved essential on such an occasion, has, as most members know already been fixed.

Gone too is Laurie Ireland and never again shall we see him perform a sponge ball routine, the "Havana" deal or his delightful version of " Find the Lady."

The lot of the enthusiastic magical playboy can sometimes be a strenuous one as we ourselves have found this month. From the date when we

WCnt Over to Amsterdam—April—Fred Taylor,

Amsterdam until the time we are writing this, there has been a steady run of worthwhile events pr meetings that have engaged our attention. Amsterdam proved more than magically interesting ; for our chief part of the visit it showed us how a magical lecture should be presented. Our good friend Henk Vermeyden, whose hospitality we feel we can never repay made certain that not only should we have the best conditions for giving our lecture but also that it should be properly staged. It is a lesson that we shall take to heart, for at Brighton, in September, we are in charge of the lectures, in which J. F. Orrin and Gus Southall will take part. Coming back to Amsterdam, the visit gave us the opportunity of seeing the Kalanag and Gloria show which, for dressing, teamwork and quality of magic certainly has no equal in Europe, and judging by informed critics, nor America. What was a pleasant change was to see a performer who had the sense to sell magic rather himself.

We also met Hans Trunk. All of our readers will no doubt have read the very fine series that he wrote some years back in "Abracadabra," and it gave us a magical experience in seeing the delight-

On the "Ring" the Levante supper at the Horseshoe proved a very jolly affair. Quite frankly we should never have thought that Les Levante was fourteen years older than when we last saw him on the occasion of his'AuRevior' arranged by the late Will Goldston at the Russell Hotel in 1940. Only a handful

Hans Trunk and Henk Vermeyden that Were present on that occasion were at the Horseshoe, and of that number three who performed in 1940 showed again on May 7th. They were Herbert J. Collings, Bill Stickland and myself.

It is amazing how one enthusiastic magician is able to organise an event such as a convention whilst his confreres, without his help, are all at sea. It happened at Cotswold when Wilfred Tyler went further afield, and now to-day we see an advertised event, the Bideford Convention flop at the last minute. This event was the result of one enthusiastic organiser, Edwin. We know that he had plenty of willing helpers, but it was his drive that made a convention in the country town of Bideford a possibility. It is said that the event died through lack of support, a thing we find hard to believe for we know quite a number in London, Bristol and Plymouth who were ready to support the convention. It is particularly hard on those who seek to combine a holiday with magic and book accommodation that has to be paid for. It is also a bad thing for the dealer who, at very little profit to himself, is willing to set up a stand. Particularly bad was the lack of proper announcement to registrants, cither directly or through the

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THE OBEDIENT COLOURS

THE LATE DOUGLAS DEXTER

" A variation of the ' Indian Sand ' trick was next introduced (sundry and various pieces of coloured tissue paper in glasses being used instead of sand), and Mr. Dexter was able to pick out from a mass mixed in a glass bowl, a handful of pieces of any of the colours as they were chosen " Magic Circular, Volume 10 (1915-16) Page 173

THIS is an effect with coloured paper pieces similar to the Indian Sand trick, but far more artistic and clean in its execution, the necessary apparatus being of small cost, and the whole effect easily performed.

1. Five ordinary tumblers of as large a size as possible.

2. Five china saucers also rather large.

3. A glass sweet or fruit jar with a cover.

4. Five lots of different coloured tissue paper (say red, white, green, blue and orange).

These pieces are made up from the ordinary sheets and each piece should measure about one inch by three quarters of an inch. It will be found that two sheets of tissue of each colour cut with a paper knife provide a sufficient quantity.

A note regarding the jar. This should be large enough so that the hand can move comfortably inside it.

To prepare for the effect stand the saucers in a row on your table, and on each saucer, a tumbler containing a number of the coloured pieces loosely dropped in, each tumbler, of course containing a different colour, (if the pieces are well shaken

■ ' - Isa before being placed inside the tumblers it is amazing how few it takes to fill the glass. Lying on the table and just behind the rim of each saucer, is a small bundle of the coloured pieces, neatly stacked and tightly compressed together about half an inch thick; they are kept secure by a strip of tissue round the bundle. A small length of fine florist's wire is run under the band, the ends fastened together, and a few twists given to the large loop thus formed close the package, the small upstanding loop forming a holder to be clipped between the fingers.

To present the effect, pick up the glass jar. remove the cover placing it on the table. Standing to the left of the table empty the papers from each tumbler into the jar. Now replace the cover, and holding the jar on its side shake it about and move it from side to side so as to thoroughly mix up the various coloured pieces. When they are well shaken together, and present a pretty appearance from the outside, stand the jar on the table in front of the saucers and remove the cover. Invite someone to call out any one of the five colours. Directly one is given, pick up the saucer with the corresponding coloured package behind

by inserting the right hand finger tips under the rim and allowing the wire loop of the bundle to come between the second and third fingers, about midway between the first and second joints of same, which are then pressed together so clipping the wire loop between them and suspending the bundle at the back of the hand. Slide the saucer towards the left hand which picks it up, whilst the right, clearly seen to be empty, (but really holding the bundle at the back) is inserted in the jar. Directly it is in, the package is allowed to drop on the loose paper pieces, when, under cover of burying the hand in the papers and stirring them round, the fingers obtain possession of the bundle, the thumb nail rjpping off the paper band, and leaving it, together with the wire loop, in the jar. Bring up the hand containing the pieces from out of the jar hold it over the saucer, ask for the name of the colour to be repeated, and immediately begin to work the pieces from the hand dropping them onto the saucer and spreading them about as much as possible. Repeat this with one or two colours, each time pressing down the papers in the jar so as to convey the immpression that there are less pieces inside the after each coloured handful is taken out.

I have obtained considerable effect with this pretty little illusion, which besides being quite of the "light" order provides plenty of scope for humorous remarks, and is equally effective on the stage or in the drawing room. When performing in the latter, or when the carrying of the large glass jar has been inconvenient I have frequently taken with me on the tissue pieces and packages together with a paper bag. Then if a glass water jug, or flower vase of suitable size was not forthcoming, the paper bag has served as a receptacle for the mixed pieces. All the other properties are easily borrowed. The glass jar is worth getting as, however, as it costs only a shilling or two (Times have changed since 1916! P,W.) and gives an artistic finish to the effect.

Editor's Note. The type of jar used by the late Douglas Dexter I think of as a biscuit barrel, and these still of course can be easily obtained to-day. a search of shops dealing in antiques and secondhand ware may easily produce something worthwhile. In this age of plastic, there must be quite a number of containers that would easily prove suitable and at the same time be light to carry with no risk of breakage.—P.W.

Many performers of great repute scarcely include a genuine sleight from the the rise to the fall of the curtain. In some cases we have heard it uncharitably suggested that they never knew any. Be this as it may, these entertainers have doubtless discovered that the public does not want sleight of hand—presented as such. To the young magician therefore, the suggestion may be made, at least pay as much attention to presentation, coupled with misdirection, as you give to extravagant moves in sleight-of-hand that, in all probability, will never be of much service.

" Magic Wand." Page 21, Volume 7

CHANGO

ROY WALTON

WE are always pleased to have something from our friend Roy Walton, and this lovely little card transposition effect we have given the title of " Chango." We have left it as Roy wrote it and please take the cards in your hands and follow it with him. We know that you will like it as much as we did when he first showed it to us, some time back.

TWO packs of cards are required, one red and one blue, the blue having a slight arrangement using the Ace of Hearts and the King of Clubs from the red pack, and its own Ace and King of the same suits. Reading from the top of the face down blue pack the cards run—Red backed Ace of Hearts, Blue backed King of Clubs, about fifteen indifferent cards, Red backed King of Clubs. Place the blue pack back in its case and you are all set.

To Perform—Remove the red pack from its case, and place it face up on the table, do the same with the blue. Say that you are going to use two easily remembered cards from the blue pack, run through the cards and remove the red backed King of Clubs and the blue backed Ace of Hearts, placing them as you come to them on top of the pack, making sure that until they are placed there the backs of the cards are not seen. Place the squared up blue pack face down in the left hand. Reach over with the right hand to take off the two ? top cards, the thumb being placed at the nearside end of the pack and the fingers at the far. Now lift off four cards by counting them with the thumb, do not hurry this, as you are supposed to be removing two cards and it would normally take a second or two. Place the rest of the blue pack on the table and with the now empty left hand pick up the red pack, which is left resting face down on the hand. Bring the right hand over to the left, and with the left fingers square up the cards held there. Besides doing this separate the bottom card of the right hand packet very slightly from the other three. Having done this, move the left hand away so that it is about eight inches from the right hand. Turn the right hand so that the face of the King of Clubs shows, and then, turning the hand back drop it from a height of about six inches face down onto the red pack. This dropping movement is almost immpossible without first separating the card as suggested. Turn the right hand to show the Ace of Hearts, (really three cards) turn the hand and reach over to pick the King of Clubs from the red pack. In actual fact when the two hands come together you release one card from the right thumb, and come away from the pack, turning the two cards left in the right hand face up and placing them on the table.

Cut about a quarter of the red pack from bottom to top, and then cut it approximately in half giving the top half to a spectator to hold. Ask him to think of one of the blue ? backed cards face up on the table. Square these two cards up, and turning them face down place them in the centre of your half of the red pack which is also face down. Request the name of the selected card and spread your half to show that only one blue card remains, the other being in the centre of the packet he has been holding. Either the selected card has remained in your heap, or travelled to the other. Both endings are reasonably effective.

" I do not think," said Mr. Sterling, " that conjuring will eventually be looked upon as a mystery. Science presents far more wonderful effects than the conjuror; the world has come to regard wonders as an every day affair. The magician of the future will have to be more of an entertainer. He will learn to please his audience by his methods of presentation rather than the mere creation of wonder. Mystery and the element of surprise will be helpful handmaids of the magician, but mystery alone, apart from the cleverest of showmanship, will cease to hold an audience."

" Magic Wand." Page 90, Volume 7

A LETTER AT A TIME

AN EMAN-WARLOCK

THE way in which Annemann, by such simple and subtle means obtained such a fine effect as Magic v. Mindreading is a thing that has always fascinated me. The original effect as most readers will be aware is one in which the magicians discovers the position of a thought of card by spelling its name and as a payoff duplicates the feat with another pack.

In handling the original effect, as far back as 1938, I felt that I would like to have a bigger choice for the selection of the thought of card, and secondly that the cards should be shuffled. Many solutions can easily occur in stating these requirements, but one wanted to be free of the need for switching packs or similar chores. The result was that in the end I obtained an effect which suited me, and at the same time kept to the path pioneered by Annemann.

The magician introduces two packs of cards, one of which can, if you are that type of magician, be a Jumbo pack. This latter pack will be thought of as pack B, whilst the other which has the lion's share of the trick will be called pack A. Both packs should be in their cases.

Taking pack A from its case, the magician remarks that he wishes to indulge in an experiment in thought control. First of all he is going to ask a member of the audience to think of a card, but, as it is quite likely such a choice might be easy to guess, insomuch that people have a number of favourite cards, the magician proposes giving him a batch of a dozen or so. At this point a number of cards are thumbed off from the bottom of the pack and are handed to a spectator with a request that he thinks of one only. When he has settled on a card he is to hold the cards face downwards and shuffle them, so that even he, will have no knowledge of the position of his thought-of card. This done he is requested to replace the heap of cards on top of the remaining cards of the pack and give the latter a complete cut. The pack is now picked up by the magician who says, ' now sir, you have a card in your mind. Will you please think of it as a name not as a picture think of it as a letter at a time if it's the three of clubs, think T. .H.. R.. E.. E----O..F

C..L..U..B..S____O.K.!' The magician places the pack behind his back. 'What I am going to do is to pick up your thoughts tactually . ... my fingers will think with you. Remember your card's position cannot be known to anyone.' The pack is now brought forward and placed on the table. ' For the first time ' says the magician, ' will you tell the audience the name of the card you thought of?' ... . The spectator does so saying, ' The two of clubs.' ' Please pick up the pack and for each letter in the name of your card deal off one card. I will lette r it with you.' The spectator takes the pack and as the magician spells cards are removed, the final letter revealing the thought-of card. This point is good for applause. When finished the magician continues. 'Actually sir, I tried another experiment with you, for I actually projected the name ' Two of clubs' into your mind. The proof is this pack (the jumbo pack is taken up) for you see I placed the two of clubs in exactly the same position. The cards are dealt off letter by letter the final letter revealing the thought of card.

I have purposely been rather detailed in describing the effect in order that the method is more easily followed. The requisites are simple. One pack of cards with the following duplicates : —

Two of clubs, ten of hearts, five of spades, Queen of hearts, five of diamonds, Queen of diamonds, seven of hearts, four of diamonds, seven of diamonds.

Put nine cards in front of this stack and it will be found that straightforward spelling of the first six cards will bring each of those cards out on the final letter. By adding the prefix ' The' to the spelling of the final three cards, each of these will finish on the final letter. Nine cards are now removed from the pack proper, and two stacks are made of these nine cards, one of them being placed face down upon the table. On top of these nine cards eight cards from the remainder of the pack are placed. On top of this stack of seventeen a short or similiar type of' key' card is placed and then on top of the eighteen cards, the remaining twenty-five cards. The remaining stack is now placed under the pack, but the four of diamonds is juxtaposed with the seven of diamonds. There is an important reason for this. Reading from the top of the pack now with the cards face down, you should have twenty-fiive mixed cards, then a short card, eight mixed cards, a stack of nine set-up cards followed by another stack of nine cards. The four of diamonds is the face card of the pack.

Another pack either ordinary sized or jumbo is required and this set-up counting from the top of the pack, with nine mixed cards, followed by the same cards in the same order as the stack of nine previously mentioned.

With the two packs in their cases you are ready to present. First of all the pack with the two stacks is removed from its case, the cards being fanned to show that they are what they are meant to be. The nine cards at the bottom of the pack are now thumbed off, and the reason for having a four at the bottom is now obvious. If the stacks were similarly set-up in every respect, another seven of diamonds would be staring the audience in the face. (Actually of course there could be a small bank of cards between the two stacks without affecting the working, but that is a matter of individual requirement). These nine cards are handed to the spectator and are referred to as, ' about a dozen.' If the thumbing off is done casualy, this is easily permissable. The spectator now thinks of one of the cards, and having done so is asked to shuffle them. This shuffle from the layman's point of view is a very strong point, and it should be well accented in the presentation. As the shuffling is being done, the cards are once more fanned and shown to the audience. They are then placed on the table and the spectator asked to return his cards on top and cut the pack. From this point all that remains for the performer is a simple cutting of the pack at the short card behind his back. The thought-of card is now in the correct position for reveal-ment by spelling. The introduction of the second pack already set-up makes for a second climax.

Mr. Sidney Oldridge said, " Presentation is greatly assisted by a genial presence. To me it is paradoxial for a purveyor of amusement to appear unhappy in a performance which he alleges is for the pleasure of others. There is infection in geniality, just as laughter is contagious ; therefore if you wish your audience to enjoy your show try to infuse this quality into it." " Magic Wand." Page 169, Volume 7

THE £50 CHALLENGE PORTRAIT

G. E. ARROWSMITH

" ¥T is not so much what you do as how you do | it" is an axiom that often applies to magic, and the effect that follows is a case in point. There is not much magic and no sleight-of-hand— its success depends mainly on showmanship, but if put over properly it will gain far more applause than many much cleverer illusions.

Here is the trick as the spectators see it. The demonstrator issues a serious challenge, he undertakes to give £50 to any charity selected by the audience if he fails to accomplish his next psychic effect, and incidentally, this is a genuine challenge and the sum involved might equally be £500 or even £5000 — but the smaller amount sounds more credible in these days of financial stringency!

" I propose," says the man of mystery, " to secure a psychic photograph of any person in this auditorium whom you as an audience care to select, and if the likeness is not a true one I promise to pay £50 to the Banardo Homes, or some similar charity. But before you decide who is to be the subject for this experiment I will set up the photographic apparatus that is to produce the portrait." He then shows a frame about 10" x 8" in size, the back is removed and it is seen to be the regulation article i.e. a sheet of glass surrounded by a narrow wooden border —a simple rectangular affair that is obviously above suspicion. The back has a piece of white glossy paper (" psychic sensitised printing paper" according to the performer!) fastened to one side and when reassembled this is next to the glass. The frame is shown to be empty—just a piece of blank unsullied paper within and nothing else. In this state it is wrapped in newspaper <(" The spirits always work under cover of darkness !") and propped against a chair, or put in some other prominent position. After this is done -(not before) and incidentally, emphasis should be laid on this time factor, the audience selects one of its number to undergo the psychic ordeal. The magician points out that no confederates or -stooges are employed, and the choice is not in any way engineered by him, and that is indeed the case—until the person steps upon the stage he has not the remotest idea who will be the " subject."

The person, whoever he or she is, is given the frame, still covered by the newspaper, to hold in both hands and is told to gaze upon it. After a few moments of this " concentrated psychic projection " the wrapping is removed, and, lo and behold ! the former glossy white paper is no longer blank and unsullied, a portrait of the very person who is holding the frame has taken its place, and what is more, the photo is acknowledged to be correct by the victim himself and also by the audience when it is shown to them : and so Banardo's Homes do not get the £50, and the performer retires to well merited applause (we hope).

Before reading further try and think out a solution to the above magical problem bearing in mind that no confederate is used, that the performer has no previous information as to who will present himself for the portraiture, and that there is no switching of frames or other difficult manipulations.

Have you discovered the secret ? No ? Well, read on.

I regret to say the solution is to be found in the category of tricks that are called " sucker." The portrait that is finally produced is a photo, or, better still, a painting of a human skull! As all skulls are more or less alike the victim has to acknowledge that it is a correct likeness. Before removing the newspaper wrapping from the frame the performer leads up to the climax in this way : " I must remind you that I undertook to produce a SPIRIT photograph and not an ordinary portrait. The spirits of course have a very penetrative sight, and they can see beyond the veil of this mortal flesh, and so this is your appearance as they see you!" and there in the frame is the grinning skull!

If the] build-up is skillfully worked the final effect is a riot for the climax comes as a complete surprise.

Oh, by-the-way, how does the portrait get into the frame ? Well, you can use that ancient prop, the sand frame, or any other stock apparatus that will change one picture for another— there are plenty of them on the market. Personally I use a frame provided by the Unique Studio (a free advert for Harry Stanley !) As it is a depot trick I must not describe it in detail, but the principle is very simple : two flaps one with the blank paper and the other with the portrait, and these can easily be transposed with one hand under cover ofwrapping the frame in the newspaper.

As to the skull, get an artist friend to paint it for you. Mine was done in water colour by an exhibitor to the Royal Academy and is most lifelike (or should it be death-like ?)

It is well to remember that a move deliberately made with careful regard to misdirection will prove a thousand times more illusive than lightning-like rapidity which only goes to enlighten one's audience in the wrong direction. If a spectator is morally certain that something happened—though he may not know what —the climax of the trick may be partly lost. " Magic Wand." Page 185, Volume 7

BOOKS

"MORE ONE MAN MENTAL MAGIC" by Milbourne Christopher (Published by Lou Tannen, New York, price 14/-)

In this little printed booklet, Milbourne Christopher details some seven mental effects which touch on mindreading and prediction.

Best of all seven would place the Magazine Test, which has already appeared as an individual item, The important thing is that in all the effects described, an entertainment angle has been devised which lifts the effect from a puzzle to a matter of general interest. There are some nice subtleties, though in the item "A Record Prediction" we feel that the method used is very suspect and that a much easier and more deceptive solution could be devised. Actually described as a " routined friental act" the choice and order of items is left to the reader. This is a point that in a similar future publication or another edition might well be looked after, especially as in this case, the fourth item is recommended as being the finale.

All those interested in mentalism will no doubt avail themselves of the opportunity of obtaining this publication, and profit by some of the angles expounded.

"ARTFUL ART AND BREATHLESS BRAINWAVES" by Hubert Leslie (Published by the Author and obtainable from him at 4 Tushmore Crescent, Crawley, Sussex, price 21/-)

This is not a book on magic, but is one that should prove of great interest to all who work in the professional or semi-professional field.

The author now living in retirement specialised in school entertainment for a period of over thirty years, his presentation taking the form of lightning sketching, the memory feat, some juggling and a trick or two. It constituted a full evening's show and was seen at every famous preparatory ^nd public school in this country. This is a fact that makes the reading of such a book so important for those whose business to entertain those of less mature age. A man who can entertain at Harrow, Charterhouse, Repton, Rugby and Roe-dean, must have found the true secret of success for these are just famous examples where not only one visit but many were paid. So much drivel is talked about children's entertaining to-day in magical magazines that it is heartening to read the words of a man who has treated children of all ages as intelligent people and given entertainment worthy of adults.

Many older readers may remember, as we do, Mr. Leslie's appearances at St. George's Hall in 1920when he produced his' Multiple Simultaneous Celebration' act. In this he did six things at once, first to listen to a member of the audience dictating proverbs from a book of well known proverbs, secondly to write down one of these as he is dictating the next, thirdly to memorise the order of five well known tunes picked at random from a list of a hundred, fourthly to play the tunes on a harmonica in the correct or reverse order, fifthly to draw any simple object on a blackboard using as an outline the words of one of the proverbs and finally to do a sum in simple arithmetic (addition of two or even three rows of figures, subtraction, multilpication or division) and with the figures written down by yet another member of the audience.

If you like reading reminiscences and at the same time adding to your stock of knowledge you will like this cloth bound, well printed and illustrated book of some 164 pages.

" ALL FAIR " A card and cigarette transposition originated by Jack Avis. (Marketed by the originator and obtainable from all accredited dealers, price 15/- complete with cards, gimmick and everything except a cigarette.

There is little need for me to tell readers of this bulletin that the name of Jack Avis attached to any magical idea means subtlety plus practibi-lity. In this present effect Jack has taken as a basic plot the card in cigarette. Round the plot however he has added some delightful subtleties that make the trick more logical in conception and without any doubt one hundred per cent more mysterious. The weakest part of the usual card in cigarette is always the switch of the cigarette. With this method that switch with negligible practice is natural and indetectible. We have seen Jack handle this and we have tried it ourselves. The vanish of the pieces of card and in their place the finding of the pieces of tobacco is one of those beautiful surprises that only a man who loves magic could envisage.

As with the very detailed routine, you obtain the necessary cards and gimmick. This effect is a literal throwaway at 15/-.

MAGIC-GO-ROUND—continued from page 71

a revival, and we can think of few outside the realm of card magic, that has seen so much written about it. Holden's particularly with the Mohammed Bey and the Millidge routines have done much to help this wave of popularity. In a little while's time we shall see our very good friend, Hans Trixer's booklet on ring magic, which touches to a great extent on the ' Ellis ' ring. As we have already remarked, the Howie ms. is excellent and all being well we hope to start serialising this commencing with the July or Aug. issue.

Touching on the Magic Circle again. In our stage column we were the first to mention the dates of the Golden Jubilee celebrations which will take place on April 28th," 29th and 30th next year. The headquarters will be the St. Paneras assembly rooms which while seeming rather prosaic in name offer excellent accommodation for a London Convention.

OQQ o

THE fact that a good magician must be a good actor is never in d o u b t, but the attitude of magicians towards a professional magical stage performance is most peculiar. This came to mind when reading a report of the opening night of a professional full evening show in which, reading between the lines, chaos reigned supreme, but the writer, being a magician and a very charming fellow as we have good cause to know added, " We know that it isn't fair to criticise the first night of a show etc." Can any reader of this bulletin interested in the theatre ever remember reading a dramatic critic's report of a straight theatrical show in which an excuse like this was made ? Of course, he cannot. It is easily realised that a change of theatre each week can bring its hazards regarding lighting and music and because of this certain acts take infinite trouble to see that the possibility of such snags are avoided by constant vigil. The fact however that a show does not run smoothly is the fault of bad rehearsal, and it brings back the old story of the fact that whilst conjurers will practise they seldom rehearse. The vastly diminishing variety minded public in this country in exchange for the " lolly " they put up, expect, when they visit a variety house to see a show that has the finish and slickness which is so adeptly ladled out by the film industry. How seldom, if ever, they see anything approaching it!

In case you scanned that particular issue, and because we think there's so much truth in it we're quoting a paragraph from the editorial of "Abra " No. 435.

" To the ordinary laymen the only names in magic which mean anything at all to-day are Maskelyne and Devant and Houdini — all dead men. Some older chaps whom one meets remember seeing Chung Ling Soo and Lafayette — also dead. They don't remember the name of one living magician — the nearest they get to it is 4 that chap I saw on television a fortnight ago.' This is not to say that magic is dead, but how many jugglers' names can you remember, now ? Where we, in common, no doubt with fellows interested in rolling mills, textiles, stamp collecting, marbles, ping-pong, and a hundred other things, make a mistake in assuming that everybody has our single-minded enthusiasm. That comes from our con stant association, in societies, with fellows of like enthusiasms. Once in a while, it's not a bad idea to take one's head out of the sand and look around at what the others are doing.'

As a tailnote to this, in the same issue of Goodliffe's paper, there is a paragraph, regarding a newly formed magical society in which it states, ' Magic and only magic is discussed.' We can think of nothing worse. These poor deluded members no doubt have high ideals, but even in a specialised fraternal organisation there should be a catholic outlook. Actually of course they will seldom talk about magic, but rather about some fiddling conjuring trick or device.

The following from the ' Magic Wand ' Oct. 1916 under the title of' Silent Code for Blackboard Reading etc.' has a familiar and quite up-to-date note:—

' The conjurer has an ordinary electric scarf pin attached to the usual pocket battery—the bulb end of the pin is faked to represent a button by covering a small ring with black silk, and this is pinned on the dress coat to represent one of the usual tail buttons as illustrated. The battery is placed inside the left trousers pocket, and any play of the flexible wire may also be pulled into the pocket

This present month will see a change in the Secretaryship of the Magic Circle. For nine years Francis White has held this post, a post far from enviable, as only his brother councillors really know. During that period, the membership of the society has almost doubled and this increase has owed much to his personal efforts. To fill his shoes is no easy task and the nomination by the Council of Peter Newcombe, who during the past few years has been assistant secretary is a most happy one. Peter has those qualifications which are the necessity of a present day secretary, an easy manner, the ability to mix in any company, a ready wit and above all the'knowledge secretaryship.

From John Howie, we have received a most excellent ms. dealing with an effect dear to his and many other magicians' hearts, the ' Ellis' ring. During the past few years, no trick has seen such continued on opposite page

PLAYING WITH MAGIC

A superbly produced cloth-bound book that is a MUST for the children's entertainer 30/- Postage 6d.

I'll READ YOUR MIND

Mental magic in the best Annemann tradition. Packed with practical marerial. Cloth-bound 17/6 Postage 46

SPECTATOR'S CHOICE

Professional standard magic of the highest order. No elaborate props required 7/6 Postage 3d.

MAGIC WAND PUBLICATIONS

Challenge Instant Hypnotism and Mass Hypnotism

George Armstrong

Chandu's Psychoanalysis George Armstrong's Premonition Magic Wand Year Book 48/9 Tricks of the Trade The Universal Mind Bohleno's Mysteries I'll Read Your Mind

Entertaining with Contact Mindreading Entertaining with Hypnotism

Automentalism Zodiac Telepathy John Ramsay's Cups and Balls Than s to Leipzig !

George Armstrong George Armstrong George Armstrong George Armstrong Ron Baillie Henry Bohlen Aage Darling S. E. Dexter S. E. Dexter

Ken de Courcy Ken de Courcy Victor Farelli Victor Farelli

21/10/3 10/3 5/3 2/7 12/9 10/3 17/9 7/9 10/3 20/3 12/9 25/6 10/3

Spectator's Choice Douglas Francis

Mother Goose Mystery Martin Gardner

Twenty-Six Living and Dead Tests Teral Garrett

The Concert Ventriloquist and Children's

Entertainer Jamesosophy Strictly Magic Mastered Amazement Toni Koynini's Card Miracles Stunts With Stage Money Suzy and the City Slickers Where Houdini was wrong

Stooging Around Playing With Magic Magically Yours

Maurice Hurling Stewart James Eddie Joseph Koran &. Lamonte Toni Koynini Jack Lamonte Jack Lamonte Maurice Sardina (cheap edition)

ioe Stuthard Wilfred Tyler Verrall Wass

FROM THE PUBLISHERS

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62 WELLINGTON ROAD, ENFIELD, MIDDLESEX

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The Magic Circle

President : Hi» Grace the Duke of Somerael,

D.S.O., O.B.E., J.P.. M.I.M.C. Vice-President: Douglas Crags«, Esq., M.I.M.C. Clubroom and Library and Museum: Hearts of Oak Buildings, Euston Road, London, N.W.I. Magical Theatre :

King George's Hall, W.C.

Forthcoming Events—

Particulars from Hon. Secretary :

Francis White, 39 Alverstone Avenue, Wimblrdon Pn-k. S.W.1Q

PETER WARLOCK'S

PENTAGRAM

is published on the 24th ol each month and can be obtained direct from the publishers for 1(7 per single copy. Annual Subscription 18/-

post free. PUBLISHED BY! The Magic Wand Publishing Co. 62 Wellington Road, Enfield Middlesex

Manuscripts for publication and books for review should be sent to the:

BDITORIAL ADDRBSS:

Peter Warlock, 24, Wordsworth Rd., Wellington, Surrey.

JACK HUGHES

will be pleased to send you fuU details of

THE DE LUXE "SU-TABLE"

together with all his other effects in return for a stamp.

Write now to

Jack Hughes, 2, Evelyn Ave., Coiindale, London, N.W.9.

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