Hand To Hand

Since early times the effect of exchanging the location of two different articles has been known to magicians. Tricks coming under this category are branded as "TRANSPOSITION" effects. While this form of magic could be adapted to almost any place, thing or condition, for intimate performances a silver and a copper coin have for long gained favour with magicians.

Magicians who are familiar with this type of trick doubtless know of many variations for bringing about the result. The personal version which 1 now offer will be found entirely different. As a matter of fact it will only need the first regular performance in front of a group of spectators to convince you of the potent impact it is capable of making on the minds of those watching. The effect runs like this.

You borrow a silver and a copper coin say a penny and a florin. You exhibit the two borrowed coins and then ask some spectator to retain them in his closed hand. The spectator is then asked to give you either coin. The coin the spectator hands you is displayed and then held within your closed fingers. So far everyone watching knows that you have for instance the penny and the helper the florin. You now open your fingers and out drops the FLORIN. When the spectator opens his hand he is found with the PENNY instead. Both your hands are again seen to be as empty as they were when you began the trick.

This has been one of my pet close up tricks for many, many years and when you learn the secret presently you will understand the reason.

To begin with, you will have to use an additional coin of your own but this will not detract from the result by any means as you will soon learn. Let us suppose you decide to use the extra penny. This is dropped, at the outset, into your left sleeve. That is all the pre-setting (if it can be called such) that is necessary.

You ask for the loan of a florin and a penny. When making the request hold both hands in a natural position at the same time permitting the spectators to see that you have nothing concealed in either of them. Of course you do not deliberately emphasise this point either by words or action. When someone offers the coins, accept the penny in the right hand and the florin in the left. Display them—one in each hand—as illustrated in Fig. 1. Note that the coins are held by the extreme points of the thumb and first finger.

Having displayed the coins, allow the penny to sink down into the hand and then drop the florin alongside of it. Fig. 2 shows both coins lying on the right hand. The penny, it must be observed, is nearer the base of the fingers. However, while attention is being drawn to the coins on the right hand the left arm straightens down, which action causes the hidden penny in the sleeve to drop into the waiting hand.

The right hand now goes through gesture of tipping both coins on to the palm of the other hand. By a slight contraction of the third finger, the penny is prevented from leaving the right hand and only

Having displayed the coins, allow the penny to sink down into the hand and then drop the florin alongside of it. Fig. 2 shows both coins lying on the right hand. The penny, it must be observed, is nearer the base of the fingers. However, while attention is being drawn to the coins on the right hand the left arm straightens down, which action causes the hidden penny in the sleeve to drop into the waiting hand.

The right hand now goes through gesture of tipping both coins on to the palm of the other hand. By a slight contraction of the third finger, the penny is prevented from leaving the right hand and only

the florin is transferred. The spectators now see a silver and a copper coin on the left palm. The original penny is, of course, hidden behind the right fingers. The penny that they now see is the one you had hidden in your sleeve. Fig. 3 shows the right forefinger pointing to the two coins on the left.

The left now turns over, above the right palm and drops the florin back to join the original penny. When the two coins are together again in the right hand, bounce them up and down a couple of times as you make appropriate remarks about the trick. However, the object of toying with the coins in this manner is to get the florin near the base of the fingers. In Fig. 4 you will see that the penny is now in the position the florin had occupied earlier as shown in Fig. 2.

From this point you again go through the pretended action of turning both coins on to the left hand but in reality, this time, you only allow the penny to leave the hand. The florin is held back. The left fingers must close simultaneously over the two pennies. As far as the spectators are concerned you are supposedly retaining the florin and the penny within the fist.

Fig. 4.

Fig. 5 is an exposed view of the two pennies lying on the left palm and the florin as you will see is behind the right, fingers. Now when the

fingers close over the pennies, you extend the fist forward and point at it with the right forefinger as you explain that you want someone to hold the money "like this!" Fig. 6 explains this part.

fingers close over the pennies, you extend the fist forward and point at it with the right forefinger as you explain that you want someone to hold the money "like this!" Fig. 6 explains this part.

Fig. 7.

Lay the two pennies on the fingers of the helper and help him to close his hands at the same time. You instruct him to keep his hands closed tightly. Let me assure you right here that the assistant will NOT realise that both coins are pennies. I have been doing this trick for well over a quarter of a century and therefore can make this statement with some degree of authority. Now comes a real bit of magic SUBTLETY which I am sure you will in time also use in other coin tricks.

You tell the spectator to reach into his fist with the tips of the thumb and first finger of the free hand and bring out one of the two coins. By way of illustration you close the left hand into a loose fist and move the right hand towards it. With the same sweeping action SLIDE THE FLORIN INTO THE FIST with the thumb.

As this is done and in continuation of the same action you reach into the fist with the tips of your own thumb and forefinger as though bringing out something. What you have really done is to get rid of the florin from the right into the

Fig. 9.

left hand. You are now able to extend your empty right hand and wait for one of the coins which the helper is about to give you. Fig. 7 is the front view of your action when explaining to the assistant how to bring out a coin. Fig. 8 is the back view showing how the florin is being pushed into the left fist.

When the assistant reaches into his fist he can only bring out one of the two pennies. You take this from him and hold it up between your right thumb and first finger tips as depicted in Fig. 9. Pretend to take it away in the left hand but when the penny is temporarily under cover of the receiving hand allow it to drop behind the fingers as in Fig. 10.

The left fingers now close over the florin which was already in the finger palm position of the same hand. You now instruct the assistant to grasp his wrist with the free hand same as you. Be it remembered that the extra penny is now in your right hand behind the fingers. You reach for your left wrist and under cover of this gesture the

penny is slipped under the watch band. This is a perfectly natural move and will not be detected. Fig. 11 is another exposed view and this shows the penny about to be pushed under the watch band. Having done this retain the grip on your wrist and ask the helper to bring his closed hand alongside of yours. Both hands are held about a foot or so above the table. Fig. 12 illustrates this stage of the trick. The climax is about to break.

Ask the spectator to indicate the respective positions of the coins and he will naturally say the FLORIN is with him and the PENNY with

you. You open your fingers and allow the florin to drop. When the assistant follows your example he will release the penny.

I am sure, after you try this out a few times you will be glad to have an impromptu trick which you can perform for intimate groups anywhere.

I recommend disposing of the extra penny under the watch band but if you do not wear a watch then merely get rid of the coin in the sleeve. I prefer the watch band idea because I could then straighten my arm right away without the fear of losing the coin prematurely.

★ ★★★★★ ★★★★★★★★ The Vampire Club

The Next Meeting will be held on F RIDAY, JANUARY 27th, 1956.

There will be the usual programme and Cabaret by

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