Method

Remove the four kings and the four aces from the pack and place them in two separate piles on the table. Then get a break with the left little finger below the top three cards of the pack, which is face down in the left hand.

An easy way to accomplish this is to down-jog the third card from the back of the pack while apparently searching for the aces and kings. Then having placed the latter on the table, flip the pack face down into the left hand and obtain the break as you square up the cards. This eliminates any messy riffle counting or spreading off of cards in order to find where to make the break.

Pick up the four kings and place them face up on top of the deck to show them and in the process pick up the top three cards of the pack face down below them. (The packet should be held in the Biddle grip, by the short ends, the thumb is at the inner end and the fingers at the outer). With the right thumb also pick off the top card of the pack below the break and use the thumb to maintain a break between this card and the other three. You are now ready to go into Ed Mario's Atfus Move.

Draw the first three kings one at a time from the right hand onto the top of the face down pack. The cards are taken from the right hand by the left thumb and as each king is drawn onto the pack it overlaps the previous one to the right about half an inch. After the first three kings have been taken, the remaining block is quickly added as one card and the whole lot squared on top of the pack. The single card held by the right thumb is released on top of the three face up kings and the remaining four cards lifted clear and placed face up in a neatly squared pile on the table. To the audience this pile should contain the four kings. In fact it was one face up king on the front followed by three face down indifferent cards. The other three kings are face up on top of the pack, concealed by one face down indifferent card. With practise you can allow the tabled packet to spread very slightly, allowing the white borders of the face down cards to show.

Get a break with the left little finger below the top four cards of the pack. This can be done either by feeling for the natural break below the bottom face up king. Or the break can be taken at the beginning of the Atfus move described above and maintained throughout. The latter is probably the more certain way.

Now pick up the four aces, with the right hand and place them on the deck overlapping each other for half their width to the right. The en I of the cards should line up with the ends of the pack. The right hand should maintain its hold of them.

The left thumb pushes the top four cards of the pack proper slightly to the right then draws the top single card back again. This enables the right finger tips to trap the three face up kings below the aces. The whole block of seven cards can now be flipped ffice down on top of the pack (a sort of book closing action) thus effectively adding the three kings to the top of the aces.

Thumb off the top four cards, without reversing their order, into the right hand and place the packet face up on the table. There will be an ace on the face, with three kings below it. All the cards will be the same way round.

Spread the pack between the hands, face down to allow three spectators to each take a card. As the pack is squared after the selection, get a little finger break beneath the third card from the top.

Pick up th2 "ace?" packet from the table and turn it face down. Fan the packet and place it in the left hand. The left hand still holds the pack, but the two can be kept apart. Simply hold the four card fan by the extreme tips of the left forefinger and middle finger underneath and the very end of the thumb above. The left little finger is still maintaining a break beneath the top three cards of the pack (aces). Fig.l shows the position.

Insert the three selected cards face up among the face down "aces" so that they are interleaved card for card. Square up the "aces" selection packet on the pack below then turn over all of the cards above the break. Without pausing lift off the top four cards (aces) and place them on the table. A good dodge for doing this is to leave the selected cards projecting forward for about an inch as they are inserted into the fan. Then square the packet along the long edges only. Next turn the whole packet over, end for end. Place it on top of the pack. Push the projecting cards square with the right thumb at the rear and in the same move lift off the four cards above the top projecting card. These will be the aces only although the audience think that the packet also contains the three selected cards.

After placing the ace packet face up on the table, pick up the "king" packet with the right hand, the thumb taking a break at the inner end. Place the pack on top of these cards. Pull down the bottom three cards with the left little finger and hold these cards back, while the right hand cuts off the top half of the pack and completes the cut by inserting it into the gap above the bottom three cards in the left hand, but beneath the rest of the pack.

Place the pack on the table, then pick up the ace packet. Wave this over the pack, then spread out the aces, to show that the three selected cards have disappeared. Toss the aces one at a time onto the table, showing that there are no concealed cards amongst them.

Ribbon spread the pack across the table. The four kings will be face up in the centre with three cards interleaved face down. Remove these face down cards and show them to be the chosen ones.

Was this article helpful?

0 0
Fundamentals of Magick

Fundamentals of Magick

Magick is the art and practice of moving natural energies to effect needed or wanted change. Magick is natural, there is absolutely nothing supernatural about it. What is taught here are various techniques of magick for beginners. Magick is natural and simple and the techniques to develop abilities should be simple and natural as well. What is taught on this site is not only the basics of magick, but the basics of many things.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment