Gmexicacn Qeometry

The performer displays six cards bearing geometric shapes: two circles, two triangles, two squares. The spectator is given one set; the performer takes the other. Both participants mix their cards. The performer lays his three cards out, face down. The spectator is asked to place his cards face up, one next to each of the performers — and to let his intuition guide the placement of his cards. Sure enough, when the performer's cards are turned up, the spectator has succeeded in intuitively matching the performer.

As the title indicates, the operative technique here is the Mexican Turnover. The cards are not gaffed, and obviously do not have to bear geometric shapes. Numbers, letters, standard Rhine symbols, cartoon characters, or pictures of any sort may be used. The only restriction is that the pairs must match exactly — thus playing cards cannot be used, as the different suits would tip the method (and to use sets of identical playing cards would be somewhat illogical). To make the description easier to follow, we will describe the work with cards numbered one, two and three.

Your cards are laid out face down in a known order — say, 1-2-3. The spectator can only arrange his cards in six possible ways.

A. If the spectator places his cards in 1-2-3 order, nothing further need be done. Turn over your cards (or let the spectator do it),to show the match.

B. If the spectator places his cards in 1-3-2 order, proceed as follows: pick up the spectator's left-hand card (1), turn it face down, and use it to flip over your left-hand (1). This is a legitimate action, but you must use a handling which duplicates the action of a Mexican Turnover. Replace the spectator's 1 back in its position. Now pick up the spectator's centre card (3), turn it face down, and use it to apparently turn over the centre card of your row. In fact, use a Mexican Turnover — you are turning over the spectator's own 3 card, and are now holding a face down 2. Use this face down 2 to Mexican Turnover the right-hand card in your row. A 2 will be turned up, to match the spectator's, and you are left holding a 3, which you replace in the centre position of the spectator's row.

C. If the spectator places his cards in 2-1-3 order, proceed as in example B, except going from right to left.

D. If the spectator places his cards in 2-3-1 order, proceed as follows: pick up the spectator's right-hand card (1). Turn it face down, and use it to Mexican Turnover the right-hand card of your row (3). You're now holding a face down 3. Use it to Mexican Turnover the centre card of your row (2). Now you're holding a face down 2, which you use to Mexican Turnover the left hand card of your row. You're left holding a face down 1. Turn it face up and replace it in position at the right end of the spectator's row.

E. If the spectator places his cards in 3-1-2 order, proceed as in example D, except going from left to right.

F. If the spectator places his cards in 3-2-1 order, proceed as follows: pick up the spectator's left-hand card (3). Turn it face down, and use it to Mexican Turnover the left-hand card of your row. You're now holding a face down 1. Use it to genuinely turn over the centre card of your row (2). Now use the face down 1 to Mexican Turnover the right-hand card of your row. You're left holding a face down 3. Turn it face up and replace it in position at the left end of the spectator's row.

There is no need to memorise this system. After playing with the various combinations it will be an easy matter of logic to determine how to handle whatever layout the spectator uses during your performance.

If you wish to mark the spectator's cards, he can lay his row out face down, and you can handle the situation without turning his cards up until the finish. If all six cards are marked, the spectator can lay out both rows face down.

phil goldstein

A handkerchief is shown empty and from it are produced, first a copper coin and then a silver one. The latter is placed within the handkerchief and a transposition takes place — the copper coin visibly changes to silver and upon ' unfolding the handkerchief the copper coin is revealed. Finally, the silver coin is enclosed within the handkerchief and the copper coin disappears and joins the silver, arriving with an audible clink.

The three effects forming the routine are not new and have been described previously with differing moves, sleights and methods. Although my handling may differ in some respects from previously published methods the only claim I make is how they have been combined to make an effective routine which is appreciated by audiences whether they be magicians or laymen.

The only properties required are a fairly large handkerchief, a silver coin (half dollar size), and two matching copper coins. With the silver

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Fundamentals of Magick

Fundamentals of Magick

Magick is the art and practice of moving natural energies to effect needed or wanted change. Magick is natural, there is absolutely nothing supernatural about it. What is taught here are various techniques of magick for beginners. Magick is natural and simple and the techniques to develop abilities should be simple and natural as well. What is taught on this site is not only the basics of magick, but the basics of many things.

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