D Pieces ft body soul

EFFECT: Part 1

The performer displays two giant cards. One card is the four of clubs while the other is the four of diamonds. Each card has been cut into four pieces. The cards are laid out on the table as in figure 1.

The performer gathers three of the black pieces in a pile on the left side of his table. Three of the red pieces are similarly gathered and placed on the right side of the table. The situation is now as depicted in Figure 1.1

The black piece is turned face-down on the table. The red piece is placed in the performer's pocket. Instantly the pieces change places.

Part 2

The cards are mixed so that the colours alternate. This is done while the cards are face-up. The colours separate magically: all the blacks are now on top and all the reds are on the bottom.

Part 3

One of the red cards is placed face-up in the centre of the table. A black card is placed facedown next to it. One of the remaining red cards is placed amongst the remaining black cards. A magical pass is made and the black cards are counted: they are all black — the red is not among them. The face-down black card on the table is turned over and is now seen to be a red card. This is repeated twice and at the end all the black pieces are on the left forming the four of clubs and all the red pieces are on the right forming the four of diamonds.

METHOD:

The first part of the routine is an adaption of Bert Allerton's "Two Card Trick". The second and third phases are products of the Elmsley Count.

To prepare: Obtain four jumbo cards (I use Bicycles). The cards must consist of two four of clubs cards and two four of diamonds cards. Take a club card and a diamond card and construct a double-face card. Cut this card into four pieces: the card is cut in half lengthwise, and then each piece is cut in half width wise.

After this operation you will have four rectangular pieces of card as shown in Figure 2. Discard pieces 2, 3 & 4 in Figure 2. These pieces are not used on the routine but will be spares for replacement purposes. If you examine the piece that remains you will find it consists of a four of clubs index piece on one side and a diamond pip piece on the other side.

The two remaining cards (a jumbo 4C and a 4D) are now cut in four pieces each. All pieces should match in size.

Part 2

Part 2 of the routine utilizes a conception of Mario's which appeared in Kabbala, Volume 3, Number 4. This entire Volume was reprinted by Louis Tannen Inc. in 1976. Jon Racherbaumer refers to the series of moves as the "Criss-Cross Subtley" and gives a full description on page 47 (ibid). For the purposes of this routine the moves proceed as follows:

(a) Pick up the black pieces by stacking one piece upon another. The black pieces are held in the left hand face-yp. The order from the face of the packet to the back is as follows: Index piece/ black pip/index piece/black pip.

(a) Pick up the black pieces by stacking one piece upon another. The black pieces are held in the left hand face-yp. The order from the face of the packet to the back is as follows: Index piece/ black pip/index piece/black pip.

(b) Pick up the red pieces by stacking one piece on another. The red pieces are held in the right hand face-up. The order from the face of the packet to the back is as follows: index piece/red pip/index piece/red pip.

For the purposes of clarity diagram 2 sets out the legend for the terms index piece/pip.

(c) Both hands now simultaneously thumb-off the cards on the face of their respective packets. The black index piece goes on the left of the table and the red index piece goes on the right of the table.

(d) The hands now cross at the wrist: the right hand thumbs the face-card of its packet (a red pip) onto the black index piece laying on the table (the cards are face-up). Simultaneously the left hand thumbs the face card of its packet (a black pip) onto the red index card laying to the right of the table.

single, piece

single piece single, piece single piece packet of three packet of three red pieces packet of three red pieces packet of three

JAZZ PIECES/BODY AND SOUL Bob Farmer

(e) The hands now un-cross. The left hand thumbs the face card of its packet onto the cards on the left. The right hand thumbs the face card of its packet (a red index piece) onto the cards on the right.

(f) Each hand now holds one card. The left hand holds a black pip piece and the right hand holds a red pip piece. The hands are crossed once again: the right hand places its card on the left hand pile: the left hand places its cards on the right hand pile.

At the conclusion of the above series of actions there will be two piles of cards on the table. On the left will be a packet of cards faceup. The order of this packet from the face to the back will be: red pip/black index/red pip/black index.

On the right there will be a pile of cards face-up. The order from the face to the back of this packet will be: black pip/red index/black pip/red index.

The packets can be spread slightly to display the mixed condition. The left hand packet is now placed on the right jacket. The single packet is now picked up and held face-down in the left hand. The order of this packet from the top down (that is, from the back to the face) as as follows: red index/black pip/red index/black pip/ black index/red pip/black index/red pip.

The top card of the face-down packet is a red index piece and the bottom card is a red pip piece. The top card is now openly moved to the bottom of the packet. The four top cards are now removed without reversing their order and dropped on the left. The remaining cards in the left hand are turned face up and Elmsley counted as four red cards (two red index and two red pips). This packet is placed face up on the table.

The left hand packet is picked up and Elm-sjey counted face-up to reveal four black cards (two index cards and two black pips).

To check whether the directions have been followed correctly to this point please note the order of the packet left in the hands after the top four cards of the stack have been placed aside. If the packet in the hands is turned face-up the cards will run from the face to the back of the packet as follows: red index/red pip/black index/ red pip.

An Elmsley count will reveal a red index, followed by a red pip, followed by a red pip, followed by a red index. If the cards are in the wrong order either a black card will show up or three indexes.

Similarly the black packet just previous to counting will be in the following order: black index/black pip/red index/black pip.

Subsequent to the display of the packets by Elmsley counting there will be a face-up packet on the left and a face-up packet on the right.

The audience believes the packet on the left to consist of all black cards. In fact the order of the cards from the face to the back of the packet is as follows: black index/black pip/black pip/ red index.

The audience believes the packet on the right to contain all red cards. In fact the order of the cards from the face to the back of the packet is as follows: red index/red pip/red pip/black index.

The packets are now set for the third part of the routine which is a version of Peter Kane's "Jazz Aces".

Part 3

In Jerry Mentzer's book Card Cavalcade II (Jerry Mentzer 1974) there is an excellent effect entitled "Jazz Aces". The description and variations of the effect are contained at pages 123 to 131. The idea of suing the pieces of a giant card for the routine is set out at page 125, and the idea of combining the effect with an oil and water theme is found at page 131.

At the end of part 2 the performer pick&up the right hand red packet and thumbs the face card of the packet (red index piece) onto the centre of the table. This piece is face-up. The three card packet remaining in the hands is turned face-down and the three pieces are counted onto the table: the order of the pieces is thus reversed. This packet will be face-down to the performer's right and will be in the following order from the top down (back to face): red pip/ red pip/black index.

The left hand packet is then picked up and held face-down in the left hand. The top card of the packet (red index) is thumbed face-down onto the red index card which is sitting face-up in the middle of the table.

At this point the audience believes a black card has been placed face-down on the red index card.

The top card of the right hand pile (red pip) is picked up and placed face-down in the face-down packet held in the left hand. It is placed second from the top.

The left hand packet is now turned face-up and Elmsley counted to display four black cards.

The card on the face-up red index card is turned face-up to reveal a red index caird. The two red cards are positioned diagonally opposite each other (so as the effect proceeds the card takes shape).

The cards in the left hand are turned face down and the top card (red pip) is thumbed face-down onto the two red index cards. The audience believes this to be a black card. Now comes a very sneaky part of the routine (this part is also contained in the Roger Divella version of "Jazz Aces": see "A Different Sound" page 129, step 10, in Card Cavalcade II). The right hand picks up the top card of the right hand packet and turns it face-up: this card is a red pip. The left hand turns its three card packet face-up and the red pip is placed third from the top of the face-up packet.

The left hand packet can now be counted as four black cards and when the face-down piece

on the table is turned over it is revealed to be a red pip: this is a real convincing part of the routine and seems to occur at a particularly strong point for the purposes of deception.

The left hand packet is held face-down and the top card thumbed onto the three face-up red pieces on the table. This card is a red pip, although the audience believes it to be a black piece.

The last piece on the right which the audience believes to be red (but-which is in fact, black) is now added face-down to the left hand packet. This card is placed second from the top of the packet.

Now, instead of counting the cards face-up, turn them over one by one and arrange them on the table to form the complete card. Finally turn over the face-down card to complete the red card. This approach makes for a more dramatic ending.

REFERENCES:

JAZZ ACES: see CARD CAVALCADE TWO at page 123. The original routine by Peter Kane is set out as well as an additional routine by Roger Divella using spot cards. The idea of using pieces of cards is set out at page 131 as is the suggestion the effect could be combined with an oil and water routine. However no routine is set out; as well the diagram at page 125 depicts cards which "leak" to the edge as mentioned above.

OIL AND WATER: see KABBALA, Volume 3, 4 at page 47 (reprinted by Louis Tannen). This is a much longer Oil And Water routine. I have used only the introductory portion.

For a discussion of the Jazz Aces effect and alternate ways in which it can be accomplished, see Phil Goldstein's Linking Ring Parade in Vol.55, 8 (August 1976) at page 55, "Jazz Lamas"

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Fundamentals of Magick

Fundamentals of Magick

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