Blooming Aces Richard M Gamble

This is an unusual method of revealing the four aces, or any other four of a kind. It is a bit of a "knuckle buster" as David Roth would say and will take quite a lot of practise. Richard recommends that it be worked with the left hand, if you are normally right handed and vice versa.

To begin with, the pack is held in the left hand, in a dealing position. Three of the aces are face down, on top. The fourth is face up and is fourth from top, immediately beneath the face down aces. How you get the aces into this situation is your own problem. It will depend on how and when you wish to feature the flourish. You could set the stack, before you start and do a couple of tricks, which leave it in place. Then magically produce the aces, using the flourish. Another way, would be to openly place the aces into different parts of the pack and to control them to the top, by means of a multiple shift — this is Richard's preferred handling. The lowermost ace must then be secretly reversed.

With the pack held, as just stated, begin by using the thumb to push the top card over to the right, for half an inch or so. Bring up the tip of the second finger, so that it can pull downwards, on the right hand corner of the top card, pivotting it into a vertical position, held between the finger and the side of the pack.

The tip of the thumb next comes to rest on the new top card and draws it to the left, until it can be pivotted into a vertical position, on the left of the pack. The two cards are now as shown in Fig.l.

Curl the forefinger over the outer short end of the pack (also shown in Fig.l) and draw the top card forward for about half an inch. A downwards pressure, from the forefinger, will cause the card to pivot into a vertical position as in Fig. 2.

From Fig. 2, the forefinger draws the card backwards, beneath the pack, using the lower edge as a fulcrum. It will be forced to turn face up and occupy a horizontal position. Similarly, the second finger and thumb draw their cards under the pack and irito the positions shown in Fig. 3. This is by no means easy. Considerable practise will be needed. When smoothly executed, the effect is rather like that of a flower opening out — hencfe the title.

boimf aretoriafjtitr tFjantije ftoocli

I have no idea of the correct date of this magazine, but at this moment we are about to celebrate the opening of a new year. 1983 that is. is. I thought I'd mention that fact because it doesn't tell you on the front cover.

The Pageboy's travelogue coming up. I was in Ireland recently, attending yet another magical shindig. I think in Ireland they call it a wake . . no I ve got that wrong, they have a wake when somebody dies and at this shindig nobody died. It was one of the strangest conventions I have ever attended, everyone enjoyed themselves.

In the first evening I was reminded of Geoff Robinson who tried desperately hard to whip up some sort of enthusiastic response from I.B.Mers in his after banquet show with his singalongs and continuously comes up against what must appear to be .a brick wall. In Ireland they don't have this problem. . . they want to join in and sing and they do. On that evening which was of an informal nature, there was probably more singing than magic and nobody cared. They were there to enjoy their convention and they did, right fromthe the word go. Everyone joined in, men women and children and me.

It was held in Limerick near Shannon Airport and although I had heard a well known dee jay mention the place several times on radio I never really believed there was a pub there called Dirty Nellie's, but but there is. I met many old friends, Paddy,

Danny, Michael, Fanny . . sorry . . Frances Sean, . . . wait a minute I think there was one Fanny, yes I'm sure there was, and there was a delightful lady comedienne whose name I have forgotten who also sang traditional Irish folk/comedy songs.

I don't remember what I did. Some close-up maybe, a lecture demonstration and an act on the gala show. There were perhaps a hundred registrants at the convention and maybe four hundred at the gala show. Which means they pulled quite a chunk of people who were laymen. They were a great audience and I'd like to go back there one day.

One incident worth retelling. I was picked up in a car and delivered to the venue where the gala show was being held. My driver who shall remain nameless because I can't remember it it was something like Paddy O'Flynn or Mick Rafferty or some other non Irish sounding name dropped me at the front entrance of a tall building just as it was getting dark. He pointed at the door and said 'In there, anyone will tell you where to go'. In I went and as I went dozens of other people wenting in at the same time. There were perhaps a dozen wide steps and then large glass panelled doors. I walked in and there was a crowd standing around inside the door. Complete with my suitcase I sort of pushed my way through and eventually found myself perhaps a third of the way down the centre aisle of the local chapel.

For perhaps half a second I thought that maybe they were holding the show in a chapel and then I spotted the alter boys and beat a you know what in the other direction. The venue was next door. Now here's a funny thing. I found out that you could get into the hall from the chapel, but to this day I'm not sure whether I was misdirected by accident or design because I also found out that my driver was the local magic club comedian who was prone to 'accidents' of this nature. I hate him, but I do hope that one day they will ask me back again. Did I ever tell you that my paternal grandparents hailed from County Galway? They did.

I forgot to mention Hubert Lambert. I hadn't seen him for many years and if he could write as he speaks we would have another Shaw, Joyce or Behan on our hands. You are retired now Hubert. Take timeout and write something . . . anything.

Goodbye Patrick Page

Effect

A Brand new effect from the brilliantly inventive brain of Magicienne/ Ventriloquist, Terri Rogers.

Performer shows a small pocket-book, approx the sixe of a pocket diary, He explains that the book contains photographs of dozens of villains.

Spectator freely chooses any one of the pictures without divulging it to the performer.

Performer now asks a few questians to which the spectator may, if he wishes, lie. Questians such as 'On which page is your chosen criminal to be found, 'what is his name' etc. The spectator may sometimes tell the truth, sometimes lie, as the fancy takes him, it makes no difference.

You now may look the spectator straight in the eye and dramatically tell him the name of his selected villain. Please note these very important points:-

1/ Performer does not need to sight the book or see anything - indeed the whole trick could be performed over the telephone if you wish! 2/ Suitable for serious mentalists, close-up, comedy presentation of cabaret.

3/ Whatever villain the spectator freely choses, you can name it. 4/ Complete comedy script provided which you may use or adapt as you wish.

5/ Very easy to do. May be repeated as many times as you wish. 6/ Comes complete with beautifully produced book of "Mug Shots" approx inches by 5j inches that slips easily into the pocket. Also supplied the complete patter, presentation, routine and handling, together with the "necessary" to perform right away.

Very highly '•ecmmended. Send at once for your "Mug Shots"

price S-6. Catalogue no:- 421

Pabular is published after the second week in every month and is printed in England. Subscriptions may be obtained from the publishers Pabular, P.O.Box 180. London SE12 8JJ England, or through many magic dealers. Subscription rates, including surface mail worldwide: UK: £10.00 {12 issues), £5.00 (6 issues). 85 panes (single issue). Abroad: £12.00 (12 issues). £6.00 (6 issues), £1.00 (single issue). USA: 830.00 (12 issues) $15.00 (6 issues!. S2.50 tsingle «issue). Air Mail Extra: USA 85 <*nts per copy or S10.00 per year. Other rates on request. Editorial or Content Copy should be sent to Walt Lees, Editor, 5 Essex Mansions, Essex Road South, London E11, England. Advertising rates sent on request.

Effect

Pabular is published after the second week in every month and is printed in England. Subscriptions may be obtained from the publishers Pabular, P.O.Box 180. London SE12 8JJ England, or through many magic dealers. Subscription rates, including surface mail worldwide: UK: £10.00 {12 issues), £5.00 (6 issues). 85 panes (single issue). Abroad: £12.00 (12 issues). £6.00 (6 issues), £1.00 (single issue). USA: 830.00 (12 issues) $15.00 (6 issues!. S2.50 tsingle «issue). Air Mail Extra: USA 85 <*nts per copy or S10.00 per year. Other rates on request. Editorial or Content Copy should be sent to Walt Lees, Editor, 5 Essex Mansions, Essex Road South, London E11, England. Advertising rates sent on request.

46 Queenstown Rd. London SW8 Engkind. M017206257

Was this article helpful?

0 0
Fundamentals of Magick

Fundamentals of Magick

Magick is the art and practice of moving natural energies to effect needed or wanted change. Magick is natural, there is absolutely nothing supernatural about it. What is taught here are various techniques of magick for beginners. Magick is natural and simple and the techniques to develop abilities should be simple and natural as well. What is taught on this site is not only the basics of magick, but the basics of many things.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment