April 161991 ALPHA

THE first two phases of this routine borrow from the plot of Herbert Milton's "Sympathetic Clubs." The third phase is of the Follow the Leader type, and the fourth combines the "sympathetic" idea with Vernon's "Travelers" effect. The structure, except for the third phase, is based on a dealer item by Bro. John Hamman called "Follow That Card." The original Hamman effect utilized eight gimmicked cards and some, in my opinion, gratuitous handling. Nevertheless, the plot sparked my interest. I am not convinced that my handlings of the various phases are the best possible. My choices were, in some measure, motivated by a desire to have all of the counting displays appear the same. That may seem inconsequential but, I believe, in a routine of this sort, consistency relaxes suspicion and thereby enhances the effect.

SET-UP: Openly remove all of the red Fives, Sixes, Sevens, Eights, Nines and Tens. Remove also the Ace through Four of Spades and Ace through Four of Clubs. Arrange each Ace through Four in that order from the face.

PHASE I

EFFECT: The performer displays and deals the Ace through Four of Spades in a row across the table. He does the same with the Ace through Four of Clubs. He counts off twelve red cards and places three face down on each face-down Club. He next mixes the order of the four face-up Spades. When he displays the packets, the Clubs are seen to have magically reordered themselves to match the rearranged order of the Spades.

With your right hand, pick up the Spade packet face up in Deep Overhand Grip. Using your left thumb, draw the Ace off the face of the packet, pulling m ma y-X'

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t'u it into left-hand Dealing Grip. Continue by drawing off the Two, followed by the Three in like manner. Finally, put the Four on top of the other three cards. Square the packet, turn it face down and deal the four cards into a row, from left to right, across the table.

Pick up the face-up Club packet and take it into Deep Overhand Grip. You are about to apparently duplicate the actions of the first count. Draw the Ace off the face of the packet into left-hand Dealing Grip. Continue by drawing off the Two, but as you do, steal the Ace back under the right-hand packet. Perform the same action with the Three, drawing it into the left hand while stealing the Two back under the packet. Drop the Two, Ace and Four, as though they were one card, onto the Three.

Square the packet and turn it face down. Deal the packet as follows: Bottom Deal—Top—Top—Top, from left to right, in a row between you and the Spades. It should appear that both packets have been handled identically and, therefore, are in the same order on the table. The actual situation is that the Spades run from left to right Ace-Two-Three-Four, while the Clubs run from left to right Four—Three—Two—Ace.

Pick up the packet of red cards and turn them face up. Duplicate the peeling action used in the earlier display to peel off the first three cards from the face. Turn them face down and place them onto the leftmost Club (supposedly the Ace, actually the Four). Perform the same actions, placing three cards onto each of the other three Clubs.

Turn each Spade card face up and place it back in the spot it occupied. Explain that the cards have a sympathetic effect on their mates; for example, "If I move the Spades, the Clubs should follow." Transpose the Ace of Spades and Four of Spades. Follow by transposing the Two and Three of Spades.

Pick up the leftmost Club packet and, simulating an Elmsley Count, fairly reverse count the packet. Turn over the top card, revealing that the Four of Clubs has followed the Four of Spades. Square the packet, leaving the Four face up on top and place it back onto the table, nearer to you and in alignment with the Spade of the same value.

Continue the sequence, performing the same actions of Step 6 with each of the other packets. At completion, the tabled cards will be as shown in Figure 162.

PHASE II

EFFECT: The performer says, "Perhaps you'd like to see that again." He reassembles the cards. Removing the Clubs, he deals them face down on the table behind their Spade mates. Now he allows the spectator to arrange the face-up Four through Ace of Spades in any order, while he places three red cards onto each of the Clubs. Believe it or not, when he counts and reveals the Clubs, the cards match again.

8 Pick up the Ace of Clubs packet and place it onto the Two of Clubs packet. Pick up the combined packet and place it onto the Three of Clubs packet. Finally, put the combined packets onto the Four of Clubs packet and pick up the entire group.

9 Take the packet into what Mario termed "Prayer" position. (This position is distinguished by the hands holding their respective cards in Dealing Grip, the fingers of each hand being free to extend above the ends of the cards they hold. In effect, the cards in each hand are thumb-palmed along their sides. This allows you to screen the cards when they are in spread condition (Figure 163), preventing the audience from determining the relative positions of the cards in the spread.

Spread through the face-down cards, out-jogging the first three face-up cards (the Ace, Deuce and Three). When the Two is out-jogged it should also be positioned to the left of the out-jogged Ace for about a quarter of its width. The Three should be positioned about a quarter of its width to the left of the Two. When the Four is on top of the left-hand packet, the right fingers, extending under the packet, slide the face-down card above the Four slightly downward and to the right (Figure 164). When the left hand now moves to out-jog the Four, it travels a bit farther left and a bit farther outward. This allows the Four to clear the displaced card above it (Figure 165). Your left hand moves back in after out-jogging the Four and pushes over the final three cards. This places four cards below the out-jogged Four.

NOTE: It's easy to miss the point of this procedure in all the details. You are trying to reach two objectives under the guise of one innocent procedure. You are openly out-jogging the Ace through Four of Clubs, but you're secretly culling one of the red cards, to position it for an upcoming move. You're also arranging the out-jogged cards in a wider spread-configuration than would typically occur by out-jogging them. The wider spread allows the out-jogged cards to provide a better screen for the actions of the Half Pass that will follow.

After all the face-up cards are out-jogged and the one card is displaced, form a left fourth-finger break above the four lowermost cards as you partially square the packet. Change your right hand's ___/6iT

grip to pinch the right side of the packet above the break, the thumb above, the fingers below (Figure 166). With a Half Pass, reverse the four cards below the left-hand break and carry them forward as the left hand moves to strip out the out-jogged cards. This resembles the Vernon Strip-Out Addition with a Half Pass added.

After the Half-Pass Strip-Out Addition your left hand will be holding eight cards as though they were four. Without pause, lever these left-hand cards face down onto the right-hand packet. Square the packet quickly but fairly, then deal the top four cards, left to right, across the table in a row. The audience should believe the cards dealt are the Four through Ace of Clubs; they are actually four red spot cards.

"From these [indicating the red-card packet] I'll place three onto each card." Turn the red-card packet face up in your hands. As you spread the cards in front of you, so only you can see them, tell the spectator, "Pick up the Spades and spread them in front of your face, like this. Find the Four and place it in front of any one of the cards on the table." While your packet is spread, secure a left fourth-finger break above the Ace of Clubs, which is the fourth card from the rear of the packet. Square the cards as you lower them, so the audience can only see the face of the uppermost card. At the same time transfer the break to your right thumb.

Execute a Pull-Down on the bottom card of the packet, the Four, and peel off the red spot card on the face and the rear card (the Four) into left-hand Dealing Grip in perfect alignment. It should appear that only one card has been taken. This is the Veeser Concept at work. Peel the next red card onto the left-hand cards, forming a fourth-finger break between the lower two cards and the upper m m i®

one. Feed the edge of the card above the left hand's break into the gap formed by the right thumb break (Figure 167) and in a continuing motion, as the hands move together, drive the card into the break and flush with the right-hand packet. As the hands separate, the left thumb peels the next red card from the right-hand packet onto the left packet. It should appear that, to this point, you've merely peeled three cards into your left hand, and indeed that is how many it now holds.

NOTE: It will take a bit of work to make this sequence smooth, but it should appear that you've just peeled a card onto the face of the left-hand packet. I believe this can be an extremely useful technique, applicable in a wide variety of situations, because it permits multiple, intermittent unloads during a Biddle-type Display without disturbing the bottom stock.

Rotate the left-hand packet face down and place its three cards onto the facedown card behind the face-up Four of Spades. The Four of Clubs is on top of this packet, with three red spot cards beneath it. Pause for a moment, then say, "Find the Three and place it above any other card on the table."

Repeat the same sequence described in Step 13, pulling down the bottom card of the packet, then peeling off a red card from the face with the bottom card (the Three of Clubs) into the left-hand Dealing Grip. Peel the next red card onto the left-hand cards, forming a fourth-finger break below it. Feed the edge of that card into the gap in the right hand's packet and drive the card flush as you peel the next red spot card from the right-hand packet onto the left hand's cards. Finally, rotate the left-hand packet face down and place its three cards onto the face-down card behind the face-up Three of Spades.

"Put the Two above any of the remaining cards on the table." The next three cards are handled in a manner similar to that described in Steps 13 and 15. You pull down the bottom card of the packet, then peel off the first red card and the bottom Two of Clubs into the left-hand Dealing Grip. Peel the next red card onto the left-hand cards, forming a fourth-finger break below it. At this point the sequence deviates from the earlier ones. Steal the card above the break onto the rear of the right-hand packet as you peel the red card at the face onto the left-hand packet. Again, rotate the left-hand palm down and place its cards onto the face-down card behind the Two of Spades.

You should be holding only three cards, which are two red spot cards with the Ace of Clubs between them. Say, "Place the final card, the Ace, above the unoccupied card." When the spectator has done so, take the top two cards as one into the left hand, simulating a peeling action. This is best done by using the left fingertips to push the rear card of the packet to the right, rather then trying to peel off the top two cards as one. As soon as the two cards are in the left hand, do a Pull-Down, forming a fourth-finger break between them. Take the single card held by the right hand onto the left hands cards, stealing the card above the left hand's break back into the right hand. Both hands should be drifting to the left as this is done, so that the face of the card held by the right hand can't be seen. This should not arouse suspicion, as the spectators have watched this sequence performed three times before and will not be paying careful attention. Finally, deposit the right hand's card onto the left-hand packet. (This is a variation of Edward Victor's E.Y.E. Count, which is a three-card version of what is commonly referred to as the Stanyon Count.) Immediately rotate the left-hand packet face down so the face of the packet is not seen. Place the three cards onto the face-down card behind the Ace of Spades.

NOTE: The total sequence described in Steps 13-17 probably reads as overhandled but should appear to the spectators to be the simple act of placing three red spot cards onto each of the four cards, just as you did in Step 4. Don't be put off by the seeming complexity. Properly performed, it can look like nothing untoward has occurred or could have.

Pick up the leftmost Club packet and perform an Elmsley Count, apparently just reversing the packet. Turn over the top card, revealing that the Club matches the Spade. Square the packet, leaving the card face up on top, and place the packet back on the table behind the corresponding Spade card. Repeat these actions with each of the other packets, from left to right across the table. The values have apparently followed sympathetically.

PHASE III

EFFECT: The performer offers to eliminate the red cards and does so. He shows the Ace through Four of Spades and Ace through Four of Clubs, then turns both packets face down on the table. "Not only does the order of the cards demonstrate their strange affinity, but so do the suits." He switches the leader Aces and the Twos follow them, the Spade following the Spade, and the Club the Club. Switching the follower packets, the suits again follow. Saying, "They're incredibly persistent," the performer switches both the follower and the leader packets—and once more the suits follow.

NOTE: This phase differs significantly from the original Hamman Third Phase. Rather it resembles the well-known Follow the Leader plot, employing a Dr. Daley ruse. (See Phoenix, No. 220, January 12, 1951, page 878.) I find this effect is easier for an audience to follow, yielding a stronger response.

"Some people feel that the red cards make the process hard to follow. I'll eliminate them." Pick up the Ace of Spades and place it face down, starting a pile on the left side of your working area. Pick up the Two, Three and Four of Spades, adding them, one at a time, face down, in order, on top of the Ace of Spades. Continue by picking the Ace through Four of Clubs, in order, off the tops of their respective packets and adding them face down onto the Spades.

Pick up one of the red-card packets and turn it face up in your left hand. Pick up a second red-card packet and add it face up to the packet already held in your left hand, secretly forming a break above the bottom four cards of the packet. As your right hand picks up the third red-card packet, your left third and fourth fingers squeeze the four cards below the break, then release them, creating a near-end crimp. Add the red cards from the right hand face up onto the left-hand cards. Complete the process by adding the last of the red cards face up to the left-hand packet and square it. Turn the packet face down, side for side, and place it to the right side of your working area. The near-end crimp will later allow you to easily lift off three red cards one-handed. This will prove useful.

"We'll use only these cards." Pick up the Spade-Club packet, turn it face up and hold it in your right hand, from above. "The Ace, Two, Three, Four of Spades and the Ace, Two, Three, Four of Clubs." As you are saying this, peel cards off the right-hand packet into the left hand as follows: Peel the Ace of Spades fairly into the left hand. Peel the Two of Spades onto the Ace, forming a break between them. Steal back the Two under the right-hand packet as you peel off the Three of Spades onto the left-hand packet, but maintain a fourth-finger break below the Three and a right thumb break above the Two (Figure 168). Peel the Four of Spades, then the Ace of Clubs fairly onto the left-hand packet. As you continue, peel off the Two of Clubs and steal all the cards above the left-hand break, so that the Two is peeled onto the Ace of Spades. Release the cards below your right thumb break as you peel the Three of Clubs onto the Two of Spades. The audience should not be permitted to see the Two of Spades as the Three of Clubs is peeled onto it. Lastly, take the Four of Clubs onto the Three of Clubs. If you were to spread the packet at this point, it would appear, from the face, as Four of Clubs—Three of Clubs—Two of Spades-Ace of Clubs-Four of Spades-Three of Spades-Two of Clubs-Ace of Spades. You have transposed the Two of Spades and Two of Clubs.

22 Riffle the packet at the back, openly looking for the dividing point between the Clubs and Spades, and lift off all the cards above the Four of Spades, separating the cards into two four-card groups. Turn both packets face down and place them on the table. Lift off the top cards (Aces) from each packet and place each face up in front of its packet.

2.5 "Not only does the order of the cards demonstrate this strange affinity for each other, so do the suits. If I switch the leader Aces, like so..." Do as much. "Not only do the Twos follow the Aces but the Spade follows the Spade and the Club the Club." Turn the Twos face-up and place them onto their matching Aces.

24 "If I switch the follower packets..." Again suit action to words by switching the positions of the two face-down packets. "Not only do the values follow but the suits as well." Simultaneously, turnover the top cards of both face-down packets, revealing that the Threes have followed both in suit and value.

25 "They're incredibly persistent. Even if I switch both the follower packets and the leader packets..." Swap the positions of the outer left face-up packet with the inner right face-down packet, then swap the outer right face-up packet with the inner left face-down packet. "Still both the values and the suits follow." Turn over the last two face-down cards, revealing that the Fours have followed.

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