Enchantments

Low Lateral Conversions November 7 1995

For a wide variety of reasons, including applicability, angles, choreography and general deceptiveness, the ability to convert from one palm position to others argues for its desirability as part of one's arsenal. Motivated by this awareness, I've investigated a number of Palm Conversions for Low Lateral Palm. These conversions run in both directions, to and from Low Lateral Palm. I considered including full details for every imaginable conversion but have decided that an overview of the...

Txjrnantula

MY NOTES on this technique are not conclusive, but they suggest that I first became aware of this unique Bob Farmer equivalent to the Half Pass in April of 1997. Bob began circulating the sleight via private manuscript in mid-August 1995. At the time, I expected that Bob would publish the technique within a reasonable period. I'd then be able to apply it, with proper credit, in those effects to which it lends itself. Under that assumption, I began adding remarks within my notes that referenced...

Bottom dealing

Erdnase Bottom Deal

THIS ESSAY was originally written as a monograph in 1978. I endeavored to update it for this book, but there may be some recent bibliographic oversights. The analysis is, nevertheless, as valid today as I believe it was when I wrote it. Whenever cards are dealt, an observant viewer would be able to describe some aspects of the deal. Such an observer would not be able to name these factors as we can, but they are readily apprehensible. These are the kind of factors that are equally relevant to...

Econd bealii

IN SECOND Deals, as in Bottom Deals, an observant viewer can discern some of the distinguishing elements. Such an observer would be recognizing appearance factors. As in all False Deals, these factors are as relevant to legitimate deals as false ones. For that reason, many of the observations made in the grip discussion on the Bottom Deal apply to Second Deals as well. They will not be restated here. Instead, after a few comparative comments and a brief historical overview, I will proceed to...

Miscellaneou false deals

Greek Bottom Deal -The earliest mentions of the Greek Bottom of which I'm aware occur in Koschitz's Manual of Useful Information (1894) and Theodore Hardison's Poker (1914). Neither Koschitz nor Hardison explain a method for the Deal. From then until now, the Greek Bottom Deal has been a technique that allows a Dealer to substitute the card second from bottom for the top card. I have no idea how the appellation Greek came to be applied. The technique was first conceived to address the problem...

June 22 1976 BETA

My notes are very sketchy as to how this effect evolved. The only fact I can determine with certainty is that I was inspired by something I saw Derek Dingle perform. A related routine much later appeared under the title of Illusion Aces in his excellent collection, The Complete Works of Derek Dingle 1982, page 79 . Derek did not explain his routine to me frankly I didn't ask and the version I saw seems to differ in some ways from what appears here and from what was eventually published. I...

September 211989 BETA

This routine offers a number of handling refinements on Wilber Kattner and Roger Smith's routine Maxi-Twist (see Innovative Magic, No. 2, 1976, page 17 and Maxi-Twist II, 1976) but is closer to its better-known predecessor, Derek Dingle's We'll Twist If You Insist (Epilogue, No. 15, July 1972, page 121 and The Compete Works of Derek Dingle, 1982, page 54). It is interesting to note that the Smith routine and the Dingle routine are identical in all significant respects except that the Smith...

Introduction

It is a performing art and an academic discipline. Both can be enjoyable pursuits. Neither can exist without the other. Magic can also be a wonderfully engaging hobby. Hobbyists, like sports fans, are true devotees they are important, perhaps even essential, to the vitality of our art, though they are not players themselves. Their tastes influence magic, their creativity feeds its repertoire and their dollars contribute to its viability as a livelihood. Still,...

The wj twostep double lift hit variation

We have already encountered the Hit variation of this Double Lift in Step 5 of Trapped Ace Surprise, page 20. However, this seems the right place to address the handling in a bit more detail. The Hit method is nearly as efficient as the Push-Off and is easier of execution. Its weakness, if it has one, is that it is does not seem to prove the card is single. If the situation doesn't require such proof, or other actions in the effect prove the point sufficiently, the Hit is acceptable. The Vernon...

False riffle shuffles

LOOKING AT False Riffle Shuffles analytically, all other considerations aside, they all must, at some point, deviate from legitimacy. While that statement might seem fatuous, the instant at which this deviation occurs determines the last moment the shuffle can be fully scrutinized by viewers. That is an often overlooked but fundamental consideration. From that perspective, the shuffle that deviates earliest is the Zarrow. A One-Shuffle Zarrow begins its deviation in the split before the...

The merlin pushthrough

Split the pack, taking less than half from the top to the right. Place the adjacent inner corners together, just touching, with the packets at an approximate 165-degree angle to each other. (This angle has more to do with consistency with my Zarrow Shuffle than it does with the Push-Through technique.) Regrasp both packets along the sides, near the far ends, with the second, third and fourth fingers at the front side and the thumbs of each hand at the near side. All fingertips should rest on...

The Krenzel Square Reverse

While holding a break under the card you wish to reverse, turn your left side toward your audience. Adjusting the packet to a position a bit deeper in the hand then usual, straighten your left thumb along the left side of the packet. The thumb should completely screen the left edge. Your right hand, from above, grips the packet, the second finger resting at the front end, and the thumb at the rear, near the left corners. The other right fingers should be straight but relaxed. In a light, quick,...

November 7 1995

Four-as-four counts that hide two cards while showing two, in the handling style of the Elmsley Count, have been offered before. With few exceptions, such counts have found limited proponents. My good friend Noel Coughlin suggests that the lack of popularity is related to the lack of applications. It is certainly true that there is a dearth of material that takes specific advantage of such counts. I am reluctant, however, to accept that the fraternity is that shortsighted. I contend the primary...

June 4 1990

THIS TECHNIQUE was developed for my Kannibal Kings routine (see Stop Fooling Us , page 11). It is based on an item titled Cul-de-Sac, which appears in Ken Krenzel's Close-Up Impact (1990, page 154). The broad method is Kens, the technique and application are mine. As a historical note, my treatment is more familially related to the Depth Illusion, popularly known as Tilt, than is Ken's. Nevertheless, my treatment would not exist without Ken's idea as inspiration. It is worth mention that in...

January 181969 FINAL

Thanks to uncounted man-years of development, representing the toil of a host of innovative contributors, all Ambitious Card routines today are essentially personalizations. It has been asserted that such personalized routines no longer contribute to the existing glut of Ambitious Card material. Following that line of reasoning, some seem to argue, no other Ambitious Card routines should see print. I strongly disagree with this proposition, and I intend to hold my routine up for examination by...

Watch the wild ace

IN APRIL of 1962, Gus Southall contributed a description and explanation of a Peter Kane routine called Watch the Ace to Hugard's Magic Monthly (Vol. 19, No. 8, page 89). This started a series of letters from magicians all over the world, sharing touches and variations on the idea. Among the people moved by the Kane routine was Frank Garcia, who altered it in a number of ways. As Frank told me the story, Lou Tannen witnessed a Garcia performance of his variation of the routine. Lou saw its...

July 1 1973 BETA

I suspect that this premise has a longer history than that of which I am aware. I will, however, offer those credits I know. The effect is a sort of packet version of a visible, slow-motion, packet-elevator routine that to the best of my knowledge, began with Bob Ostin's 1974 marketed effect, The Submarine Card. The presentational idea of a card acting like a submarine, however, seems to date back to Charles Jordan's Impossible Journey (Thirty Card Mysteries, 1919, page 58). Ostin's version...

METHOD 4 November 30 1973

Method 4 is based on a Gene Maze idea, though he was not aware of this routine at the time. His concept, the Universal Stock Ellison Poland's Wonderful Routines of Magic, First Addendum, 1973, page 39 , introduces an additional element to the effect, allowing the number of hands between three and seven to be chosen by the spectator. You could, of course, accomplish this additional feature using Bottom Deals alone but for those familiar with Gene's method using a combination of Riffle Stacking,...

Miscellaneous false deals

Double Deal It may be argued that the Double Deal is insinuated in Erdnase, with no technical detail, by Illustration 26, page 59. It was certainly in use as a means for dealing extra cards to oneself or a partner. That, of course, is the purpose for which it would be most useful to a gambler. For the magician it has many additional uses. It should be apparent that the Double Deal has some of the functionality of a Double Lift. It can also be applied to False Counts. It is in that capacity that...

Strip Out Cuts

7.6 LONGI TUDINAL Cut The deck is in position for a longitudinal strip-out. I don't often use this approach but it does have its place. I have used three variations. I don't claim any of them as original. The first is to split the cards as you would for a Faro Shuffle. The second is to split them in the hands for a cut to the table. This looks like an honest cut. The third variation is for tabled use. In effect the action is like the strip-out after a Push-Through or Strip-Out Shuffle. All...

The Sequel September 9 1969 FINAL

Brown treatment of the Thought-of Card Across plot (see the aforementioned Wandering Card in Willane's Method's for Miracles, No. Three, 1952, or Trevor Hall's The Card Magic of Edward G. Brown, 1973, page 39), and is therefore related to The Blushing Leaper. (I think Jordan's Unknown Leaper see his Four Full Hands, 1921, page 27 plays a part in this history, but it would take some work to figure out exactly where.) Unlike The Blushing Leaper, it has no kicker...

November 9 1973 BETA

This effect is a treatment of the now classic Card in Matchbox. Generally, i would see no reason to include yet another handling of this idea. (Matt Schul-ien, Eugene Burger and Tony Giorgio have all featured this item and influenced my interpretation.) Nevertheless, I think you will find this version has some interesting features that distinguish it from others. The method is a clear outgrowth of a Peter McDonald routine called The Gambler's Prediction from his inspirational book Highly...

Etude for dealer

When Bill Simon mentioned The Scarne Puzzle in his 1949 book, Controlled Miracles (page 21), it is unlikely anyone anticipated where it would lead. It is doubtful anyone even noticed. When he published Call to the Colors in Effective Card Magic (1952, page 79), it aroused little interest because so few card men of that period could deal Seconds not to mention Bottoms well enough to use them under the conditions prevailing in the routine. Subsequently, when Mario explored the premise (Mario...

Mental magic

Some of the effects in this book suggest that the performer has the ability either to predict or control future events, or to read or control a spectators thoughts. Such effects are commonly classed as mentalism. There are some members of our fraternity who would contend that magicians should not perform such effects, that they should be left to those who work as mentalists. I am not sure how widely held this position is, and I don't want to set up a straw man but I feel this issue should be...

Vanishing eleven and placement

IT WOULD be very easy to skip right over this item, thinking, The Vanishing Eleven again If you do, someone is going to fool you with it. Remember, I warned you. There's not much point in recounting the history of the Vanishing Eleven. Most cardicians know Ed Mario contributed it to Ibidem, No. 24 in December 1961 (page 9 page 535 in the book edition). The idea of interest here is a concept Fulves called the Nine-Principle Location. The description of this principle appeared in Epilogue, No....

April 161991 ALPHA

THE first two phases of this routine borrow from the plot of Herbert Milton's Sympathetic Clubs. The third phase is of the Follow the Leader type, and the fourth combines the sympathetic idea with Vernon's Travelers effect. The structure, except for the third phase, is based on a dealer item by Bro. John Hamman called Follow That Card. The original Hamman effect utilized eight gimmicked cards and some, in my opinion, gratuitous handling. Nevertheless, the plot sparked my interest. I am not...

September 31981 ALPHA

BIRTHDAY Aces is so named for two reasons First, the idea came to me on September third, which is my birthday and second, the patter is based on the idea that on my tenth birthday my great-grandfather taught me how to handle the first Ace on my twentieth birthday my grandfather taught me the handling of the second Ace on my thirtieth birthday my father taught me the procedure for the third Ace. And the fourth Ace is my own because he didn't live to see my fortieth birthday. Birthday Aces is a...

Lushing leaper

MANY YEARS ago, Jack McMillen developed an effect (The Leaper Card, n.d.) that is clearly related to, but somewhat different from, a card problem later addressed by Edward G. Brown (see Wandering Card in Willane's Method's for Miracles, No. Three (1952) or Trevor Hall's The Card Magic of Edward G. Brown, 1973, page 39). The McMillan approach became popular for a while but fell into relative disuse. As I see it, apart from procedural differences, the distinction between the two plots turns on a...

The zarrow shuffle

IN MY years of doing magic I have seen many people perform many different False Riffle Shuffles. Of all I've seen, as done by both magicians and cheats, none have been as deceptive as the Zarrow Shuffle The New Phoenix, No. 346, July 20, 1957, page 210 and Dai Vernon's More Inner Secrets of Card Magic, 1960, page 49 . No Push-Through or Strip-Out, no matter how fine the brief or how smooth the action, can compare, and for riffle stacking the Zarrow Shuffle is nearly ideal. Having written this,...

March 7 1990

THE WTJ count is an incremental evolutionary step in the development of a convincing Elmsley-style Gemini Move. It may not be the final step but it is, in my opinion, the best offered to the fraternity to date, and it's easy. The basic idea for the move derives from a Larry West technique called the Mirage Count, which is essentially a handling variation of the Olram Subtlety but the WTJ Count hides two cards while showing two cards twice during an Elmsley-style Count. In that respect, the...

October 21 2002

With many forms of the Double Lift it is both possible and desirable to turn the double card down, unloading one, and at the same time have it appear that the card s was never redeposited onto the deck. The origins of the following technique seem shrouded in controversy. Back in the mid-1960s Larry Jennings developed it after studying a similar but far more difficult procedure by Dai Vernon, published in The Gen Vol. 19, No. 7, November 1963, page 175 . The Jennings technique circulated through...

The Jehhfowj Count July 1 1973

You are now ready to execute the JEHHFOWJ Count pronounced JEFF-OOGE , which combines elements of the Jordan Houghton-Haxton and Elmsley Counts with a five-card packet. It was devised for this routine but has much broader applications. It is similar to, though I believe it predates, a count devised by Daryl Martinez called The D.M. Count first described with a three-card packet in Secrets of a Puerto Rican Gambler, 1980, page 109 and with a four-card packet in Daryl's Cardboard Chameleons,...

Catalytic progressive aces

The progressive Ace premise has generally been considered a Ken Krenzel problem dating back to the 1960s. Stephen Minch, the ever-helpful publisher of this work, brought to my attention that Roger Smith may have been the first to have published a version of the Progressive Aces, in Necromancer (Vol. 1, No. 1, August 1970, page 6). The Smith treatment, however, is nearly incomprehensible in parts. One of the appealing aspects of the routine is the simplicity of the plot. The first Ace vanishes...

Color triumphant

Let me begin by making it clear that I do not consider this treatment a revolutionary improvement on Derek Dingle's beautiful routine as it appears in Dingle's Deceptions with Cards and Coins, written by Harry Lorayne (circa 1966, page 3). Nor is it a Zarrow-based effect but while we are on the subject of Triumph effects I thought I'd include it. I consider Derek's routine to be the culmination of the Triumph-Color-Changing Deck routine, the best extant. I have been performing this version for...

Alignment displacement sequence

(A WJ TECHNICAL VARIATION) January 14, 1990 In TED ANNEMANN'S Alignment Move (see Synthetic Sympathy in The Jinx, No. 2, November 1934, page 7) the top card of a three-card packet is pulled partially back so the second card can be pushed forward while simultaneously realigning the top card with the bottom one. The out-jogged card is then either drawn from the packet for display or relocation or the aligned cards are turned end over end as a single card onto the out-jogged second card to display...

September 19 1971 ALPHA

This effect grew out of playing with a Hideo Kato effect, Where Has It Gone (Genii, Vol. 34, No. 1, September, 1969, page 16). A Mario version later appeared in Hierophant, No. 2 (1970, page 63) under the name, Over Here of Course This Mario effort was followed by a Roy Walton treatment called, Gone to Earth (Hierophant, No. 4, 1970, page 187). In the same issue Mario replied to the Walton approach with Fly Me to the Moon (page 189). All these treatments are methodological explorations. In any...

METHOD 1 November 24 1973

Openly remove the four Kings from the deck while secredy culling the four Aces to the face with one indifferent card for cover. Mario's Moveable Card Pass (New Tops, Vol. 9, No. 3, March 1969, page 27 or M.I.N T, Volume II, 1995, page 50 or see page 173 of this volume) will allow this to be done directly. You may, however, use the Mario Prayer Cull New Tops, Vol. 6, No. 6, June 1966, page 28 or M.I.N. 77, Volume I, 1988, page 232) to bring the Aces to the top of the deck, then with a Double Cut...

The Bluff Shift As A Riffle Force

As previously mentioned, the Bluff Shift can be substituted for the Riffle Force. Let's assume you wish to force one or more cards which you have positioned first, second, third, fourth, etc. from the top. Perform the first segment of the Bluff Shift, riffling down the corner until stopped and apparently removing all the cards above that point. If you now allow the spectator to take the top card of the left-hand group, that card will be one of the Force cards from the top stock. Which card they...

Sympathetic blacks

IN Vol. 8, No. 12, September 1908, of Ellis Stanyon's Magic (page 90) he discusses the use of a glass with a tinfoil-backed card. This special card effectively converts a normal glass into a mirror glass. Applying this method to accomplishing a packet switch, I believe it possible that a method was developed for the effect known as Sympathetic Clubs. I have not, however, been able to determine where this method may have seen print. The trick, accomplished with double-faced cards, has, through...

METHOD 5 December 1 1973

This method was created in an effort to duplicate the effect of Holdout Holdup while standing. In that sense, it was developed more to explore the challenge of doing so than to find an approach that is in itself compelling. I got more than I sought, as you will see. Begin as in Method 1, Step 1, by openly removing the Kings from the deck while secretly culling the Aces. Have the Kings signed but, before doing a Double Cut to transfer the Aces to the bottom, crimp the bottom card in whatever way...

November 29 1973

The Monday after Pat showed me his original version, November 26, 1973, I passed my ideas along to him during a phone conversation. He accepted the ideas as creating a different, stronger effect than the original. He did not, however, care for my method, as it was his desire that the effect fool other magicians, a goal toward which I never strive. To achieve that goal, he maintained, it was necessary to remove the left hand from under the jacket clearly empty. I found this a desirable feature...

The diagonal pa

ASSUME THE Basic Position with the left hand only and allow the hand to relax. Start to bring the hands together and, as you do, begin to speak. You need to say something that will explain taking the deck from your left hand into your right. You might, for example, say, I'll let you shuffle the cards, or I'll keep the deck on the table. As soon as the right hand reaches the deck, and as the line you are speaking is completed, you should be in Basic Position with both hands. Start to move the...

Preferred Method December 201974 BETA

In late 1974, I was in Chicago doing a trade show when I had the opportunity to get together with a devoted local amateur with whom I'd met previously, while he was visiting New York. His name is Mike Kozlowski (best known for his manuscript, The 100 Bill Switch). During our session he showed me an idea he said Al Schneider was experimenting with and asked my opinion. I suggested that the idea seemed a good one but that only experimentation would prove how good. That idea, which I dubbed The...

December 27 2001 BETA

On december 22nd, in a brief but rich session, a serious, young card-worker, Rick Franceschini, showed me his handling of a well-explored plot, the card sandwich. To this plot, by virtue of method, he had added some interesting elements not otherwise possible with the same directness. I considered Rick's treatment immediately interesting, as I informed him, but somewhat flawed by his less than optimal exploitation of the features he had made possible. Thereafter, despite the season's...

No Contact Add Back November 2 1995

My friend Carl Albright first suggested the idea of releasing all but the third and fourth finger clip on the card(s) and allowing it (them) to fall onto the deck. As he demonstrated it, he covered it with a pointing gesture. I have refined his idea slightly, to better incorporate the gesture, but this is, essentially, his technique. As mentioned earlier, you'll find that when you have a card in Low Lateral Palm you can still open your hand almost fully. The last bit is constrained by the need...

The sigma principle

New principles in magic are fairly rare. This effect depends upon what I believe to be one of those rarities. It is clearly related to the Stay Stack concept (a Rusduck idea see Cardiste, No. 1, February 1957, page 12) and the ancient principle used in the Clock Effect, which I call the Ten-Twenty Force. To explore the other related principles here would be a thankless task (and probably fruitless as well). No matter which principles I cite, someone will argue, more or less persuasively, for...

Wj On The Zarrow April 1970

Prepare for the Shuffle by undercutting more than a third but less than half of the deck to the right. The smaller the portion you take, the smaller the block you will have to screen later. Thus, unless the application demands it, slighdy less than half is preferable. (See notes, at the end, on the question of cutting the top or the bottom to the right.) Bring the packets together so that they form an inner angle of 160-165 degrees. An angle smaller than 160 degrees may be suspect, but...

Abled Winnipeg Cut May 14 1975

Action move it to the right Figure 203 and clear of the left-hand packet. action move it to the right Figure 203 and clear of the left-hand packet. The first finger creates the illusion that it is the top that moves to the right. This move is a tabled version of Mel Stovers Winnipeg Cut. See Garcias Million Dollar Card Secrets, 1972, page 93. Others may argue that another designation is more historically accurate. Argument, for example, could be made for calling it the Marnase False Cut see...

Allan Kennedy Fake Center Deal

Center Deal -The Center Deal has a nearly mythical history, documented in a little-known article by Bruce Elliott and James Tuck in Saga magazine (March 1952, page 51). The article was titled The Search for the Middle Deal. It recounted Dai Vernon's tenacious effort, throughout the 1930's, to track down a man rumored to deal from the Center of the deck. The man Vernon eventually found was a card cheat named Allen Kennedy who, Vernon maintained, taught his technique to him. More recently, Karl...

The Wj Side Steal December 15 1968

There is a strange history to the Side Steal. For many years it was considered an essential move it then fell into relative disuse. Still more recently, it is again enjoying a resurgence of interest and popularity. I believe the reason for its fickle past is, at least in part, that few people do it well or invisibly. This is due in large measure to the considerable exertion of force required to squeeze the deck, as part of the extraction. The exertion of force, biophysics being as they are,...

January 1965

FORM A small fourth-finger break at the near right corner, under the two (or more) cards to be lifted. The method used to accomplish this will depend on the circumstances of the effect and will not be directly addressed here. With the right hand, grasp the cards above the break as a unit in Overhand Grip. The right thumb should be on the near edge, near the right corner, and the fingers at the front edge. The right thumb and second finger will do most of the work. Lift the cards slightly, more...

February 111973 FINAL

I consider Card Warp (released as a one-trick manuscript in 1974) to be among the most unique effects of the twentieth century, and a masterpiece as it was originally intended to be performed. In spite of all the variations that have seen print in the ensuing years, none have improved upon the gem at the core. I will not either, nor is there any need for me to do so. Instead, I will offer an improved means of beginning the effect and an ending that approaches par with the rest of it. I believe...

Breaking in the cards

I am forever amazed at how little attention most magicians pay to the way in which they prepare their cards for use. Pianists are very particular about the tuning and regulation of their instrument violinists carefully tune the violin and resin the bow drummers tune and tighten the drum heads, nail their bass drums to the floor, adjust pedal tension and make sure that the kit doesn't ring. Magicians, regardless of conditions, whip out a deck and expect it to perform. They complain bitterly when...

Low Lateral Steals

The techniques and applications we've been looking at thus far have used the Low Lateral Palm position in a form of Deal Switch and a form of Side Steal. It can be much more. Unlike most concealment positions, which severely restrict the use of the hand, Low Lateral Palm leaves all the fingers and, most importantly, the thumb, free to be used in other ways. As flexible as it is, one must initially move the card(s) into Low Lateral Palm before anything else can be done. The techniques for doing...

Bottom Add Backs

Carl's technique for the No Contact Add-Back led to the following pair of techniques for adding cards from Low Lateral Palm to the bottom of the deck. While turning to the left, move your left hand to the right and in toward your body. Stop when the left hand is about six inches in front and four inches left of the right hand. Open and extend your right hand, releasing all holds except the clip. Move the hands together, the left fingers straightening, to allow the clipped card to pass above...

Marlos Future Reverse Broken Form

In my experience, this technique can either be performed quickly or quiedy but not both. I opt for quietly, which demands that you perform it slowly. In part because the move must be performed slowly, both hands remain in contact with the packet for a fairly extended period. Such moments are always problematic, as there is nothing for the spectators to watch except the hands. In this case, because there is another action taking place (the removal of the Spades), the problem is ameliorated, but...

The Spread Displacement

Push the out-jogged card partially back into the packet so that a bit less than half of its length protrudes from the front. Grip the top card (face down) and the out-jogged card (face-up) by the right side at the area where the two cards overlap. Your right thumb should be above, your first and second fingertips This next sequence, the essence of the move, may prove easier to accomplish if the right first finger pushes up very lightly on the out-jogged card. Slide the two cards to the right...