The Riffle Force

This is one of the easiest and most versatile forces in card magic. Start by having the force card (or cards) at the center of the deck (which is held in left dealers grip) with a left pinky break above it photo 9. Tell the participant that you want him to stop you somewhere in the deck as you riffle through it. Riffle down the outer left corner with your left thumb, stopping where told and maintaining a fairly wide break as depicted in photo 10. Bring your right hand over the deck in Biddle...

Coeur dAlene Assembly

John Bannon's Mirage includes a card assembly routine, M nage a Quatre. I fell in love with the routine, but felt it had one drawback five jokers are passed off as four. The problem with this is that you also use twelve red spot cards, which are shown freely and the spectator can handle. I wanted to begin and end with the spectator being able to handle and count all the cards, joker or spot. That meant re-routining the effect without the extra joker. While this made the sleight-of-hand aspect...

Lumberjack Stew

This routine is fun and visually interesting with an unexpected ending. I absolutely love performing it. Effect You spread through the deck and remove one card, which you place face down on top of the card box. Next, Chad shuffles the deck and places it on the table, where Jenna and Troy are allowed to cut it. You spread the deck face down and Chad, Jenna and Troy each select and sign a card. These are set face down on the table. You cut the deck into three packets, which are also placed on the...

Worth the Trouble

In this chapter you'll find three routines that require a bit more effort. The first requires a special deck (it can be done without one, although not as effectively). For the second, you'll need two extra packets of cards, one of which is gaffed and the other prepared in advance. The third routine demands a plethora of extras. But, as the title above says, the impact on the audience makes them worth the trouble Mr. Collins Opus McCall of the Wild The Legend of Scott Star, Trader Vic & Slick...

HiWays BiWays

My good friend and mentor, Aldo Colombini, considers J.K. Hartman's Card Craft to be the single greatest volume of card magic ever published. After having finally obtained a copy of this nearly impossible to get tome, I can see why. Mr. Hartman filled the volume to overflowing with simply superb effects. In going through the book (quite a chore, at over 600 pages ), several items in particular caught my attention. One of them is an elevator effect called Bi-Way. However, like some Wild Card and...

Universal Appeal

Karl Fulves' Universal Card plot has captured the imagination of many card men. My take on this plot is very simple and direct in effect, and almost as simple and direct in method. It is exceptionally easy to do and very clean. Effect After thoroughly shuffling a deck, you set it down. You remove three additional cards, which you refer to as Chameleon cards. These are placed aside and three cards are selected from the deck. The chameleon cards are placed onto each selection in turn, and they...

Familiar Ring

Chapter Five contains three routines with borrowed finger rings the first for close up performance and the other two for parlor or platform. Following them is my routine for one of the classic props in magic, the Jardine Ellis The Ring on Stick is considered by many well-posted magicians to be the single greatest close up effect that can be performed. I feel that most of the routines in the literature are too short people always want to see this particular effect repeated. The few I have seen...

The X on Val Dees

Here is my extended routine of Ed Marlo's Oil and Water plot. It is based primarily on the work of two of my good friends, Aldo Colombini and Dan Fleshman. The first part is Aldo's Nice Salad from his book, What's Up, Deck I have changed the last phase and the handling to include the face up face down effect. This is followed by Ray Kosby's Never the Twain Shall Mix from Spectacle and Dan's Oil Slick, which can be found in his book, Encounters of the Close-up Kind. Effect Red and black cards...

Jacks Transposition

In 1978, Karl Fulves published an excellent book entitled, Transpo Trix. The final trick in this manuscript is an unsolved card problem that Mr. Fulves called Snark Hunt. Effect Here is the effect in Mr. Fulves own words This is my idea of an ultimate version of the thought-card transposition. You start with a packet of aces and a packet of jacks. One jack is named and one ace is named. The ace packet is picked up. The named ace magically turns face up, but also, it is the only ace in the...

The Buckle Count

While the preceding routine actually uses the Reverse Buckle count, the two are so similar that I will just teach them together now. This count hides one or more cards while apparently fairly counting a packet. Assume that you have a packet of five cards that you want to show as four. Hold the packet face down in left dealers grip. Push the top card over slightly with the left thumb so the right hand can grip it by the right side, thumb on top and fingers below. The right hand takes the card...

JuSt Kidding

Birthday parties, schools, libraries one of the biggest markets for magicians is kids shows. In this chapter I've given you two of my favorite routines for audiences comprised of children and families. Plumber's Bottle Million Dollar Chocolate I have always disliked effects that make the spectator seem to be a fool or always wrong. There are a few exceptions, like three card monte where you perform it as a demonstration as to why they shouldn't play because it's impossible to win, or the...

The Elmsley Count

This false count was originally called the Ghost Count, but it has come to be more commonly named after its inventor, the great British magician, Alex Elmsley. It is also a four-as-four count, and is very similar to the Jordan Count. In fact, a happy coincidence is that the Jordan Count sets you up for the Elmsley count, and vice versa. To start, then, the cards are in the order shown in photo 20. Grip the packet with both hands as in photo 16 and take the top card away with the left hand as in...

First Word

Well, here we are again I thought that Officiously Yours would be my last book, at least for a while, but it turns out I had some more and I think very good material left in me. It's almost as if I'm just not happy unless I'm working on a book If you've read my previous works, you already know my philosophies and thinking to a large degree, and the routines in this latest tome will reflect those ideologies. If, on the other hand, this is your first exposure to my magic, I think a brief overview...