Coin Magic

The Bobo Coin Vanish

Coin Vanish Magic Tricks Step Step

The main point in favor of this and the three coin vanishes that follow is an illusive element called retention of vision. In other words, not only does the coin actually appear to be placed in the left hand-the spectators think they see it in that hand AFTER the hands separate. The result of the perfect illusion these sleights create is complete deception. Hold a half dollar by its edge between the tips of the right thumb and middle finger and place it squarely in the palm of the left hand,...

Silver or Copper Extraction

Effect Showing a copper and silver coin in his right hand, the magician wraps them in a borrowed handkerchief. A spectator verifies that the coins are actually in the handkerchief by feeling them through the cloth. A second spectator is given absolutely free choice in choosing one of the coins. Whichever one he names is actually removed, leaving the other still wrapped in the handkerchief. Here are three methods. Borrow a handkerchief and hold it in your left hand while you show an English...

The Tunnel Vanish

Tunnel Vanish

Hold the left hand palm downward and close it into a loose fist so only the thumb and forefinger touch. The right hand holds the coin horizontally between the forefinger and thumb-thumb is on top, Fig. 1. It will be noted that if the coin is pushed into the left fist and then released it will fall to the floor because of the slightly open left fingers. But if the second, third, and fourth fingers of the right hand are extended when the coin is released it will fall onto these fingers instead....

Acknowledgments

Most of the material in this book, including my own, is based on accumulated research, ideas, and effects of other magicians. Directly or indirectly, I am therefore indebted to all coin workers. An honest effort has been made to credit the source of all material as accurately as possible, but slips may have crept in. If I have failed to recognize the originator of any idea, sleight, trick or move in the following pages, I hereby offer my most humble apologies. I owe thanks to all my...

The Drop Vanish

At the outset the coin rests on its side at the middle joint of the right forefinger, Fig. 1. The hand should be held perfectly relaxed with the fingers curled inward naturally. Furthermore the hand must be tilted very slightly forward so the lower part of the hand will be closest to the body. The waiting left hand is palm upward and a few inches lower than the left hand. Both hands move toward each other and just as the right hand is over the left it tosses the coin into the air about half an...

The Hook Coin

One of the most common, yet one of the most neglected gimmicked coins is the hook coin. This is simply a coin with a hook (usually made from a steel pin) fastened to its edge in such a manner it can be hooked onto the clothing, Fig. 1. The original, and probably the simplest method for vanishing the coin is as follows Stand with your left side toward the spectators as you show the coin, keeping the hook covered with the thumb. Toss it into the air about a foot with your right hand and catch it...

Coins Across

Without a doubt some of the most puzzling effects possible with coins are those of the transposition and passepasse variety. Tricks of this nature seem to hold a special fascination for most spectators. How a magician can cause coins to travel from one place to another is completely beyond their comprehension. In this chapter you will find many unique and different effects of this nature, all worthy of your consideration. All are time-tested and with the exception of one, they are strictly...

Of Coins and Conjuring

Archaeologists and numismatists tell us that the first coins were issued in the east and west in the eight century B.C., and their use soon spread over the civilized world. An ancient tradition has it that coinage was the invention of Pheidon, king of Argos. By the end of the sixth century B.C., the art of coinage had been well established, and Periander had instituted the Corinthian coinage which became one of the great commercial coinages of the world. Electrum (a natural mixture of gold and...

Guess Which Hand

Magic Hands

I think the average magician would welcome the opportunity of obtaining the secret of a trick that had been a pet of another magician for over three decades. Here is just such a trick. It has been performed by Jim McLemore literally thousands of times, under every conceivable condition, until it has reached a state of perfection seldom found in tricks. This is the first time it has been explained to anyone. Here is the effect The performer reaches into his pocket with his right hand, takes out...

James Buffaloe Coin Magic

Effect The magician shows two coins and places them on the table about a foot apart. He takes the right hand coin in his left hand in such a manner there is no doubt that the coin is actually in that hand. The remaining coin is taken in his right hand. Holding the hands some distance apart, he opens his left, showing it empty. At this instant the missing coin is heard to join the other in the right hand, which is then opened to show the two coins. Method A clever new sleight is responsible for...

Elder Blacrledge

Effect The magician empties five half dollars from an Okito coin box, places the coins on the table and covers them with the bottom section of the box. One coin leaves the box and travels to his left hand. Then the remaining four are held in his right hand, but again a coin passes to his left hand. Now he places two coins on the back of his left hand, covers them with the box and holds his right hand below. One coin penetrates his left hand and appears on the back of his right. Finally, he...

Karrel Fox And Roy Kissel

Effect Five borrowed half dollars are placed in an overlapping row on the performer's left hand so they alternate heads up, tails up, etc. The wonderworker pushes the coins together and holds them in a stack between the fingers and thumb of his right hand. He then releases them one at a time, allowing them to fall onto the left hand. As the coins fall they are seen to be all one way, i.e., all heads up. Somehow they have mysteriously rearranged themselves. Method Borrow five half dollars and...

The Okito Coin

If it hadn't been for a chronic case of indigestion the Okito coin box probably would not have been invented. Back in 1911, Theodore Bamberg (Okito) operated a magic shop at 1193 Broadway, New York City, and had as his partner a man named Joe Klein, who suffered constantly from indigestion. Joe kept a drawer full of pills for his ailment. One day, while waiting for a customer to drop in the shop, Okito was idly toying with one of Joe's pill boxes when he suddenly discovered that the lid would...

The Back Thumb Palm

The coin is clipped by its edge with the thumb and is concealed behind the hand, Fig. 1. The moves necessary to get the coin into this position are harder to acquire than the Downs palm but this palm has the advantage of being considerably more angle proof. For this reason it is excellent for close work. There are three ways to get a coin into this position. The first is a method used by T. Nelson Downs, while the other two are my own. For the Downs method the starting position is the same as...

The Sympathetic Coins

Here is one of the oldest and best close-up coin tricks of all time. Almost every magician who does intimate magic has one or more versions in his repertoire. Several versions will be described on the following pages, but to better acquaint the reader with it in its pure and simple form I would like to give the original Yank Hoe method which was first described in T. Nelson Downs' The Art of Magic. Effect The performer borrows a handkerchief and four half dollars. He spreads the handkerchief on...

The Downs Coin Star

This is more a feat of digital dexterity than a trick of magic. It is generally credited to T. Nelson Downs who used it primarily in his close-up work. Because the coins are balanced on the tips of the fingers and thumb it is important that large, heavy coins be employed. The feat is made easier and more sure-fire through the use of a little wax on the coin that is balanced on the thumb. (See Note at end.) Hold the right hand palm upward with the fingers extended and well apart. Show five coins...

Downs Eureka Pass

This beautiful vanish and reproduction of several coins was devised by that master coin manipulator, T. Nelson Downs. Effect The magician shows four coins. Taking them one at a time in his right hand, he causes them to disappear by apparently tossing them into the air. After showing his hand empty back and front he proceeds to reproduce them one at time. Procedure Show four coins (of a size you can easily back palm) and place them on a nearby table. Standing with your left side toward the...

Stage Coin Magic

A Comedy Coin Routine Coin in the Banana Coin in Ball of Wool and Nest of Boxes Flight Three Although coins are more suited for use in close-up tricks they have been used for many years in stage tricks. During the vaudeville era quite a number of magicians made reputations for themselves by being specialists. For instance, there was Gus Fowler with his clock act, Arthur Lloyd with his any card called for act, Ade Duval with his silk act, and still earlier, Howard Thurston with his card act and...

Dave Coleman

Every top flight magician I know uses comedy in same degree in his show. Even though you may be a serious type performer a laugh now and then helps make your show more enjoyable. In this world of today we need to forget our troubles-we need a few laughs. This trick is designed with that in mind. The trick is fine for presentation before almost any group, providing there are a few children present. Effect The performer asks for two boys to assist him in a trick. One boy stands on his left, the...

Coins Through the Table

One of the finest tricks of close-up coin conjuring is this classic attributed to Han Ping Chien. It ranks with such old-timers as The Miser's Dream, The Cap and Pence, and The Sympathetic Coins. Until recently not too much has been generally known about the trick, since its secret has been closely guarded by a few top-notch performers. Effect The magician shows eight half dollars and one quarter. He arranges these in two parallel rows on the table so that there are four halves in the left row...

Jack Chanin

Effect The magician removes a half dollar from his pocket and displays it in his left hand, and the hand is seen to be otherwise empty. He takes the coin with his right hand and produces a second coin from the air with his left. Now he has two coins --one in each hand. He places the right hand coin between his lips and transfers the coin in his left hand to his right. A third coin is immediately produced from the air with his left hand and he again displays a coin in each hand. Each time he...

Dr E M Roberts

Effect The performer shows four quarters which he places in a row on the table. Nothing is concealed in either hand. Picking up one of the quarters with the right hand he tosses it into the air where it vanishes. The remaining three coins are caused to disappear in a like manner. After tossing the last coin into the air he shows his right hand empty. Making a grab in the air with his left hand he produces the missing money. Method Once again the Dr. Roberts' Method of Sleeving plays a big part...

Nate Leipzig

One of the real classics of coin magic is The Cap and Pence or The Stack of Quarters. It has been a pet effect in the repertoires of many great magicians of the past and present. The effect of the trick is unique and startling. The most difficult part of the trick is the switch of the real coins for the gimmicked stack. This is accomplished in two different ways in the following two routines. The first is by that master of dexterity, Nate Leipzig, and was shown to me by a contemporary master,...

The Click Pass

Paul Morris, the famous New York sleight-of-hander, has an entirely different conception of this useful sleight. In his version the effect is the same as described in method (a) of the foregoing description of The Click Pass. That is, the performer places one coin in his left hand. Then a second coin is ostensibly dropped onto the first, the sound of the two coins coming together offering convincing proof that the left hand actually holds two coins. Nevertheless, only one coin is in the...

The Slide Vanish

This sleight to cause a coin to disappear was devised by John Mulholland when he was about twelve years old. Because of the reliable peculiarity of the eye called retention of vision, the spectator sees the coin go into the hand and is very much surprised when the magician shows it isn't there. The Slide Vanish has the added advantage of being a completely natural move. This is the effect The magician holds his right hand out fiat to show a half dollar resting on the center of the palm. Tilting...

The Elusive Silver Dollar

A silver dollar or a coin of similar size is recommended for this sleight, but some will find that a half dollar will work just as well. Stand with your right side toward the spectators as you display the coin in the right hand. It is lying near the tips of the two middle fingers in position for back palming. Turn the left hand palm down in a cupped position over the tips of the right fingers and, as you pretend to take the coin in the left hand, back palm it in the right. This is accomplished...

The Pulse Trick

Ever since Glenn Harrison showed me this trick in Denver a few years ago, it has been one of my favorite bits of close-up chicanery. The effect is new and different and possesses all the essential elements of smart magic. It is intriguing to the onlookers for the patter fascinates them, and at the same time makes a perfect cover up for the one simple sleight. Effect The performer shows a silver dollar as he tells a spectator that he is going to test his nervous system. He asks the spectator to...

In a Spectators Pocket

Who would suspect the magician of disposing of a vanished coin in a spectator's pocket Yet, this is exactly what is done. In each instance the coin is secretly deposited in a helper's breast coat pocket. Here are three methods. Method (a) Display a coin lying in the right hand on the two middle fingers in position for back palming. The left hand turns palm down over the end of the right fingers and pretends to take the coin, but it is back palmed with the right hand. (See The Back Palm.) The...

Jimmy Buffaloe

Effect The performer goes to his pocket and brings forth a nickel which he exhibits on his outstretched right hand. With his left hand he shows a playing card on both sides and the hand is otherwise empty. He brings the card over the nickel hiding it from view. He immediately removes it. The nickel has changed to a half dollar The magician quickly covers the half dollar for a moment. When the card is removed the spectators see the nickel again. The nickel is tossed onto the card and both can be...

One to Four Cal Emmett

Effect The performer removes a half dollar from his left trousers pocket and takes it in his right hand. Then making a tossing motion in the air he causes the coin to vanish. After showing the hand empty on both sides he reaches into the air and produces the half. He holds his left hand in a fist and places this coin between the middle joints of the third and fourth fingers. Reaching into the air again with his right hand he produces a second coin, then places it in a similar position between...

Quarter and Half Dollar Transposition

After a version which appeared in Ireland Writes a Book This trick, the brainchild of Laurie Ireland, is one of the most novel effects of its kind I have ever run across. Glenn Harrison showed me a version of it, to which I have added a few ideas of my own. The composite version follows. General effect A quarter and a half dollar change places a couple of times in a unique manner. Finally the half dollar changes to two quarters. Requisites and Preparation You will require three quarters and a...

The Modern Miser

Here is a practical, easy-to-do method for producing several coins. The effect is clean cut and there are several surprises in the routine to upset the theories of your viewers. Effect The magician reaches behind a spectator's lapel and extracts a half dollar. He tosses the coin into his left hand, plucks a second from the spectator's ear and drops it along side the first. He shows his hands unmistakably empty with the exception of the two coins, and immediately produces a third piece of silver...

Milton Kort

Using the foregoing method, a sucker vanish can be worked that is a real fooler to magician and layman alike. I'll wager it will become one of your favorites. Besides having a handful of coins, you must be wearing a wrist watch with an expansion band. Proceed as in the above vanish up to the point where the non-existent coin is placed in the left hand. From here on the effect differs greatly. As you pretend to place a coin in the left hand, that hand closes over the first two fingers and thumb...

Three Coin Monte

In his Magical Monthly for July 1913, Servais LeRoy tells of a trick with three pennies that was done in a tramcar in Madrid by an ingenious gentleman of ragged appearance. LeRoy describes the effect in these words displayed the pennies on his open hand, one near the tips of the fingers, one near the base of his fingers, and one in the centre of palm. He showed them back and front, and then moistened a small piece of paper, and stuck this to one coin. He then moved coins, altering their...

Coin Production from Two Cards

If my memory serves me correctly, this little gem appeared in The Sphinx some years back. I have never met anyone who has seen it. It is so good I would like to record it here for the benefit of all. It is a nice thing to know when you have to produce one coin, either at the beginning of a trick or at the climax, after a duplicate coin has been vanished. Effect The prestidigitator shows two playing cards several times, front and back, in the fairest possible manner. Placing the two cards...

The Gadabout Coins

In January 1950 The Linking Ring carried an effect called The Alleurian Coins, by George F. Wright. It appealed to me, so I experimented with it-making a change here and there, and came up with the routine which follows. The easy sleights are described in the foregoing chapters. The effect is simple and direct, and the routine is so designed that the performer will always be one jump ahead of the spectators. Effect In this bit of hocus pocus the wonder-worker calls attention to three half...

The Bent Penny

It is an accepted fact that audience participation tricks are always sure-fire. This one is no exception. Because of the unusual climax the trick is much more effective when performed with the assistance of a lady. Effect The magician borrows a penny and gives it to a lady to hold tightly in her hand. After a bit of byplay he announces that the penny has vanished. The lady opens her hand. The penny is still there, but apparently she held it too tight because it is now badly bent. Method Quite a...

Number Three

Requisites and Preparation Seven quarters with different dates and an eighth with a date to match one of the other seven. This extra coin, of a known date, is fastened with wax to the bottom of the gimmicked box, head side showing. Have the two boxes together in your right coat pocket and the quarters in your right trousers pocket. In your right hip pocket have a clean, folded handkerchief, and on the table have two pieces of paper about three inches a square, and a pencil. Working Inform the...

Dr Carl L Moore

Effect After showing a half dollar and a quarter, the performer holds the large coin in his left hand and the small coin in his right. He slowly closes his hands on the two coins and holds them some distance apart. A spectator is asked to guess which hand holds the quarter. No matter which hand he guesses, the performer shows that hand to contain the half dollar. Now the performer pretends to transpose the coins several times, each time showing that the half dollar has changed places with the...

Jack Makepeace

This version combines several standard sleights and tricks in an interesting and novel routine, which can be varied according to the performer's ability. Requisites Five thin palming coins, a wine glass, and a small dish with a rim high enough to conceal the five coins when they are placed therein. The dish is on the table. As you begin you have the five coins concealed in the Downs palm position of your right hand and you are holding the wine glass by its stem with your left hand. With your...

The Bobo Complete Coin Vanish

This is merely a continuation of The Bobo Coin Vanish. At the finish both hands are shown empty. The coin has vanished completely. Continue The Bobo Coin Vanish up to the point where the right hand thumb palms the coin as it makes its first pass over the closed left hand. It is at the beginning of the second pass that the right hand disposes of the thumb palmed coin. It is dropped in the outer left breast coat pocket as the hand swings inward to begin its second pass, Fig. 1. There must not be...

Sucker vanish

Effect The performer shows a half dollar and apparently places it in his left hand, but the spectators see him remove it and carry it to his pocket. They waste no time in telling him where the coin is, but when he opens his hand the coin is still there. The same moves are repeated. This time the coin actually vanishes. No better effect than this could be used to close a routine of coin tricks. It is a dandy for the wiseacre and perfect for the kids. Method Tell your audience that you will try...

Rubbed Through the

Here is a companion effect to the one described above. Although both produce the same effect, they are accomplished by different means. They are alike, however, in that both are direct and convincing. Effect The right hand rubs a coin on the left leg and it disappears. The same coin is produced from behind the same leg with the left hand. Only one coin is used. Method The right hand flips a half dollar in the air a few times. Bend over and apparently place the coin on the left leg, but actually...

Through the Pocket

This bit of close-up coin chicanery has been a favorite with magicians for many years. It is one trick that can be performed anytime with excellent results, as it is strictly impromptu. Here are three methods. Effect A half dollar placed in the right trousers pocket is caused to penetrate the cloth in a mysterious fashion. Method (a) Call attention to a half dollar clipped flat between the tips of the right first and second fingers, in position for finger palming. Holding the coin thus, the...

Some Observations on the Subject

Before attempting sleeving in any form it is important that the student understand that this type of chicanery cannot be successfully performed while wearing just any kind of coat. To sleeve with absolute certainty the sleeves must be of the proper length and size. Of course, after you become proficient in the art of sleeving you will find that it can be done fairly well while wearing any coat. But to be sure of yourself it is advisable not to attempt sleeving unless you are wearing a coat with...

Al Saal and Milton Kort

Most magicians are interested only in entertaining the general public with their magic. But there are others whose specialty is performing tricks designed especially for the bewilderment of their brother wizards. Among these are such men as John Ramsay of Scotland, and the late Dr. Samuel Cox Hooker. Quite a number of our contemporary dose-up workers are also experts in this field. Nowadays, with so many secrets of magic available from magic and novelty shops throughout the country, more and...

J G Thompson Jr

Here is a close-up quickie that should find favor with a great many magicians. It is easy, effective, and requires no advance preparation. Because of a clever bit of misdirection it can be repeated with safety--even for magicians. Effect While seated, the performer shows two pennies and puts them on his left leg about six inches apart. The outer one is taken in the left hand and the inner one in his right. At command, the coin in the left hand is caused to pass over to the right. The left hand...

Frank Drobina

Several years ago, while attending the Texas Association of Magicians Convention in San Antonio, Texas, I saw this effect for the first time. Although the routine makes use of simple, actually elementary sleights, it is a real baffler, and is calculated to puzzle the keenest observer, whether layman or magician. To make this book complete I felt that I must have Frank's routine, but when I wrote him he replied that he couldn't do the trick justice without demonstrating it in person. He said he...

Glenn Harrison

This ingenious feat of magic won its inventor, Glenn Harrison, a prominent coin manipulator of Denver, first prize in the sleight of hand contest at the Society of American Magicians' Convention in 1949. The method used to accomplish the effect is not one which will be quickly adopted by many magicians, and for this reason it will be more of an exclusive item for those who do go to the trouble to prepare for the trick. Those who do use it will find that they have one of the most baffling feats...

Al Baker Magical Apparatus

This trick, by Al Baker, is considered by most magicians a close-up classic. A book of this kind would not be complete without it. The plot is of the simplest nature-four half dollars are passed one by one through the table top from the left hand to the right. No duplicate coins are used. The trick must be done while you are seated at a table and, before making any mention of doing a trick, a little preparation has to be made. With your right hand grip the cloth of the left leg of your trousers...

Stuart Cramer

A trick that requires simple sleights is usually favored by most magicians because such a trick allows the performer to concentrate on presentation and showmanship. The following trick, although not very difficult, requires careful timing and misdirection to put over successfully. Properly done it is a classic. As the spectators see it With his sleeves rolled up, the magician shows a fifty-cent piece, places it in his left hand, then gestures with his right, showing unmistakably that the coin...

Trick Coin Trickery

How long trick coins have been employed by magicians will probably never be known. Almost every close-up performer owns one or more of them. Who has not heard of the Dime and Penny Trick or the Half Dollar in the Bottle This latter trick has been a reputation maker for more than one magician. Gimmicked coins make possible many unique and mystifying effects which would be impossible with ordinary coins under similar circumstances. But it must be remembered that while they will pass for real...

The Squirting Nickel

Most magicians are familiar with the squirting nickel. It looks like a genuine coin, but is actually hollow and may be filled with water, which will squirt from a small hole near the edge, when the nickel is pressed. It will send out a fine stream for a distance of approximately six feet. Often it will hold enough for five or six squirts. Perhaps you have one and have wondered how to use it. Following are a few suggestions. When filling the coin, submerge it completely with the hole up. Press...

Mystery With a Half Shell

Magicians who own either the expanded shell or the old style set have found it difficult to separate the two noiselessly and invisibly. Here is a simple and natural method of accomplishing this, together with an easy routine. Display the nested shell and half on the ends of the two middle fingers of the palm up right hand, opening of the shell being up. Turn the hand inward, so its back will be toward the audience, toss the real coin into the left hand and retain the shell in the right by...

The Folding Half

Editor's Note The folding coin was described in More Magic (1890), but its usefulness was not fully realized in that day One trick that always creates a sensation and is remembered long after it is shown, is the Half Dollar in the Bottle. Practically every close-up performer has performed it at one time or another. Numerous magicians have featured it in their platform shows. Blackstone thought enough of it to use it in his elaborate theatre show a few years ago. Almost every magician has his...

The Magic Mint

Effect A nickel, held between the forefinger and thumb of the right hand, is actually placed into the left hand after the spectators have satisfied themselves that the hands are otherwise empty. Following a couple of mystic passes, the left hand is slowly opened and, in addition to the nickel, there is also a half dollar. The half is placed in the pocket, while the nickel is retained. The nickel is taken in the left hand and allowed to become warm, then slapped into the right hand where it is...

M S Whitfords Version

Here is another modern version of this old classic that should appeal to many. The routine is unique in that the performer produces fourteen dollar size coins without the benefit of gimmicks or body loads. Nothing is used but the coins, a transparent glass to drop the coins in as they are produced, and the two hands. And best of all it is just as effective when performed at close range as at a distance. Requisites and Preparation A glass of the high ball type with a recessed bottom large enough...

Al Caroselli

Effect After showing his handkerchief unprepared, the magician spreads it on the table, folds it in half, then places two nickels, a dime, and a penny in a row upon it. He folds the handkerchief over the coins tent fashion and removes them one at a time and places them in his left fist. One of the coins is removed from his fist and placed on the table. The remaining three are caused to travel back to their original positions under the tent. Requisites and Preparation A 21ft Trick (which...

Coin in Ball of Wool and Nest of Boxes

This version of an old classic carries a fine pedigree because for years it was a program item of Dana Walden, a lyceum magician who was popular in the early twenties. I am grateful to my good friend, Rolland Hamblen, for furnishing the routine. Effect The magician borrows a half dollar and has it marked in such a way that the owner will positively be able to identify it when he again sees it. Holding the coin in plain view, he requests a boy to step up and help him. He gives the boy a wine...

Dr E M Roberts Method

Here is a method of sleeving that is so good, so practical and flexible I feel that it will become one of the most popular methods. It is a feat of pure skill which, on the face of it, seems absolutely impossible. Properly used it will puzzle the initiated as completely as the veriest layman. The method of sleeving about to be described is a radical departure from the general conception of this neglected phase of sleight of hand. There are no extraneous moves to telegraph your actions, such as...

Trio of Vanishes

Here are three ways of vanishing a coin, each appearing the same but each entirely different from the other in method. They can be performed in the order given or separately. If performed together each builds on the preceding one, the spectators becoming more puzzled as each vanish is executed. Number one Turn your right side toward the spectators and show the coin pinched flat between the tips of the right first and second fingers. Hold the left hand palm down and close it into a loose fist....

Stewart Judah

Standing full face to the audience, hold both hands open (palm up, with the tips of the fingers stretched out to the front), and about two inches apart. Show a coin in the right hand, and then toss it back and forth from one hand to the other a few times. When the coin arrives back in the right hand after a few tosses, place the right thumb on top of the coin and pretend to toss it back into the left hand. Actually the right thumb retains the coin as the left hand closes, Fig. 1. Immediately...

Coin Through a Ring

Almost every close-up worker is familiar with that oldie, the Coin Through a Ring, which requires a gimmicked coin for its accomplishment. Now comes a new method which depends on a trick fold in the handkerchief instead of a trick coin. Both methods will be described. First, the original method A coin is placed in the center of a handkerchief, then the four corners are gathered together and pushed through a man's finger ring. The ring is pushed up snugly against the coin and a spectator holds...

The Ghost of a Coin

This unusual audience participation trick is always well received. Two versions are given, both time-tested. Effect While being tightly held in a spectator's hand, a half dollar changes to a glass disc. Requirements A half dollar and a glass disc the same diameter and thickness. Go to a glazier and have him cut several glass discs each the size of a half dollar. The glass should be as nearly the thickness of a half dollar as possible. The kind of glass that is used in small picture frames is...

The Bobo Switch

One of the most valuable of all coin sleights is a good method for switching one coin for another. Here is one that I have used with success under all conditions for many years. It can be used as an effect in itself or as the means for accomplishing numerous other effects, several of which will be found in the chapters that follow. Learn this sleight and you will have a valuable tool that will serve you well as long as you do close-up magic. For the sake of clarity suppose you learn this with...

Through the Hand

There are many occasions when the magician needs a little trick to perform on the spur of the moment--an incidental effect that can be done quickly without special props. This is just such an effect. I will describe three methods. A half dollar is shown in the left hand. The hand is then closed on the coin and turned over so the back of the hand is uppermost. The fingers work the coin partially out of the fist until it is barely held by the tips of the second and third fingers and the heel of...

Dr Boris Zola

Effect After showing a silver coin, the magician gives it to a spectator to hold tightly in his hand. He then lights a match and moves it in a wide circle around the spectator's hand, claiming that the heat from the match will soften the silver enough to enable him to remove it. The match is discarded, then the performer extracts a small nugget of silver apparently through the back of the spectator's hand. The spectator opens his hand. What he now holds appears to be a coin but it is entirely...

Hen Fetsch

This is an effective and practical follow up trick to the one just described, as it sells the transposition and serves to exchange the gimmicked coin for a genuine one. Effect The spectator who assisted you in the previous trick is requested to hold up his arm as for drinking a tall cool one. The magician shows a half dollar and an English penny, drops the English penny into his assistant's sleeve and the half dollar into his own. He commands the coins to transpose themselves. The assistant and...

Gene Gordon

Effect While relating a story on how he was short changed at a circus, the magician shows a handful of change consisting of seven coins. He tosses the money into his left hand where it is heard to arrive, but when he opens that hand a moment later all but two of the coins have vanished. He shows his hands otherwise empty and allows the coins to be examined, as they are genuine. Requirements The trick depends on a special gimmick which is simply a group of five coins (two pennies, two nickels,...

The Shell Half

There are two types of shell half dollars. The old-style shell will only fit over a special cut down half-one that had been reduced in size and its edge remilled. The two parts are an integral part of each other and must be used together. The expanded shell is a shell that has been stretched to fit over any regular half dollar. The best expanded shells are hollowed out from the head side of the coin. Since the tail side is not as deeply embossed as the head side a deeper cut can be made from...

Ralph De Shong Courtesy The

Ralph says he prefers a Coca Cola bottle for this routine because they can usually be found almost anywhere. Their slight color and fluting help conceal the gimmicked half. You can carry your own bottle or borrow one. Be sure the bottle is clean. The bottle is given to a spectator while you borrow a half dollar. When this is received, the spectator with the bottle is requested to bring it to you. You ask, You have examined this bottle and find it to be an ordinary Coca Cola bottle You see holes...

Coin in the Banana

Here is a dandy comedy trick that is suitable for children's shows or for performances where children are present. Effect The magician asks for the loan of a half dollar, which he has marked for future identification, then has it brought to the stage by a boy from the audience. He gives the boy a banana to hold while he takes the marked coin. As he causes coin to vanish he states that it will appear in the banana, but when he turns to the boy he sees that the boy has eaten the fruit. Thinking...

Charles Morritt

Although Morritt made no specialty of coin manipulation, he included at one time in his repertoire two very effective tricks. From a very soft Panama hat he would produce not a few coins, but several hundreds. The loads, under cover of effective misdirection, were stolen from behind the left lapel of his Dress Coat. This concealment of small and soft articles behind lapel was a dodge very much favoured by Morritt. Another engaging trick that he featured for some time was based on the old...

Chinese Money Mystery

Effect The performer places eight pennies on a table, four in each of two vertical rows. Beginning at one end of the two rows and using both hands, he picks up a coin from each row simultaneously. To show that everything is fair, he tosses the two coins back on the table and again picks them up, one in each hand. He gathers the next two in exactly the same manner, throws them to the table, takes one in each hand as before and continues in this manner until none remain Although he should have...