Ultra Coin Assembly

David Roth

Without pausing, continue, "...but I won't touch them." As you say that relax your right palm and allow one of the two coins in classic palm to drop to the table. Reposition your right hand over the just-dropped coin so that it's beneath your thumb base (fig. 188 is a side view). The only sleight used in most of this routine is the action of sliding a coin beneath the thumb base. (And you'll have to be able to do it with both hands equally well.) Right now you've got a coin beneath your right thumb base. Lift your hand as far off the table as possible - your thumb base will hang lower and continue to rest on the coin (fig. 189). Your hands hover over the table during the entire routine, and it appears as if you're not really touching the coins, merely covering them. You've got to have a good classic palm to do this or else your right hand will look cramped.

189

Move your hands forward and cover the outer two coins (a coin sliding beneath your right thumb base), and say, "I could cover these two" (fig. 190). Retract your hands, covering the two inner coins, and say, "Or I could cover these two" (fig. 191). Now, your hands move independently, your right hand covering the inner left coin. Say, "Or I could cover these two" (fig. 192). Reverse the positions of your hands, i.e., your right hand covers the inner right coin while your left hand covers the outer left coin, and say, "Or I could cover these two - but nothing happens until I wiggle my thumbs." During all of the above movements the hidden coin slides beneath your right thumb base. It will appear completely natural.

190 191

190 191

Let's go over the final covering movement again because your left hand does a little extra something as it covers the coin at the outer left. Move your left hand over the coin so that it's directly beneath your thumb base. Now move your hand toward you just a bit, sliding the coin beneath your left thumb base, your hand moving as if to cover the coin (if it was still there) with your palm (fig. 193). This is called The Hook Action. All your left hand is really doing is, as it covers the coin, sliding back a bit farther so the coin appears to be beneath the palm when it's already been stolen beneath the thumb base.

Wiggle your thumbs. Both hands move simultaneously to the sides, your left hand taking a coin, your right hand leaving a coin, so that two appear at the inner right and none at the outer left (fig. 194). Move your hands inward and let them relax, to rest position behind the coins. Your left thumb base has a coin concealed beneath it.

Move your hands forward again. Your right hand covers the two coins at inner right - but The Hook Action is not necessary. Simply lower your right thumb base over the innermost coin. Your left hand covers the inner left coin (fig. 195). Your right hand steals a coin beneath thumb base and your left hand leaves its coin as your hands simultaneously move back to rest position (fig. 196).

196 197

Move your hands forward again. Your right hand covers the coin at the outer right, adding its coin. Your left hand covers the coins at the inner left positioning the innermost coin beneath thumb base (fig. 197). Wiggle your thumbs and simultaneously move both hands to rest position, your left hand sliding a coin beneath it (fig. 198).

Move your hands forward again. Your right hand performs The Hook Action as it covers the coin at the inner right. Your left hand covers the coin at inner left (fig. 199). Your hands move to rest position, your right hand stealing a coin, your left hand leaving a coin, so that two coins are at the inner left and two at the outer right (fig. 199 a).

You're about to enter the final sequences of the routine where the two coins at the inner left will almost visibly jump to the outer right - no hands cross, no extra moves. In order to do this you . re going to have to lap two coins, one at a time, without making any noise. David has a sure-fire method that's easy. Your legs should be crossed beneath the table throughout the routine - but not tightly. Of course they must be crossed just snugly enough so that a lapped coin will not fall through (between your thighs). After the first coin falls into your lap you'll have to squeeze your legs together, covering the coin already there (it should be almost folded under the cloth of your pant leg) so that when the second coin lands it won't hit the first.

Okay; two coins are visible at the outer right and two more at the inner left. Move your hands forward, your right hand covering the two coins at outer right and adding the one beneath thumb base. Your left hand covers the coins at inner left, the innermost coin positioned beneath thumb base. As your left hand covers the coins it hooks inward, sliding the coin beneath thumb base off the table and into your lap (fig. 200).

Move your hands to rest position, your right hand leaving a coin, and your left hand simply moving aside. That leaves three coins at the outer right and one coin at the inner left (fig. 201). Squeeze your legs together as already described, creating a place for the next coin to fall.

Move your hands forward again. Your right hand covers the coins at outer right and simply relaxes, allowing the coin which has been in classic palm throughout the routine to fall onto the table beside the three already there (it should not clink against them as it lands). Your left hand performs The Hook Action, getting the coin at inner left beneath thumb base and, without pausing, moving back a bit to the table edge and lapping it. To end, simply turn your hands palm up (where they are) book style revealing four coins at the outer right (fig. 202).

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