The Shuttle Pass

David Roth

This is a versatile utility move - many of the later routines in this book use it in one way or another (or another!). I'll assume, for the moment, that you're sitting when you learn this, though the move can be done standing as well.

Classic palm a coin in your right hand - that's the coin that'll be switched in. Another identical coin lies in finger palm on your palm-up left hand - that's the coin that'll be switched out. Your hands rest on the table about six to eight inches apart; your left hand palm up, just above the table, your right hand curled in a relaxed fist (fig. 16).

This is a balanced move, i.e., both hands begin moving at the same time and stop (when it's finished) at the same time. There are no loose ends, unnecessary movements, etc. The technique isn't difficult, but the timing is. It'll take some intense concentration to resist your natural urge to do things before the proper time. I'm telling you all this in advance because forewarned is forearmed: don't do anything until I tell you.

Okay; raise your right hand slightly and begin moving your hands toward each other. The right-hand coin stays in classic palm for now. Continue to move your hands together until your right thumbtip almost touches your left pinky base - it should be directly beside it (fig. 17).

Now, two things happen simultaneously. Your left hand's action is the simpler of the two - just turn it palm down, retaining the coin in finger palm (fig. 18). (David always raises and curls his left pinky a bit it gives the hand a flatter appearance.) At the same time your right hand turns palm up, your fingers moving beneath your left hand and pointing directly to the left. The timing on when your right palm relaxes and lets the coin fall onto your right fingertips (which happens as the hand turns up) is tough to explain. It happens at the last possible moment. In other words, you don't let the coin drop onto your fingertips and then simply turn your right hand palm up when it reaches your left hand - it doesn't look good. Let's go over the last few movements again.

When your hands are moving together, and your right thumbtip almost meets the left pinky base, your hands immediately start turning over - your right hand palm up and your left hand palm down. It happens as a continuation of the to-the-left movement of your right hand. If you relax your right palm at the precise moment that your right hand stops moving to the left the momentum of the entire hand will be imparted to the coin - and it will continue to move to the left (fig. 19).

The coin flies to the left at the same time that your right fingers are straightening, and it lands on them beneath your left hand (fig. 20). It's really much simpler than I'm making it sound, but I want you to do it properly. David always thinks of it as if his palm is throwing the coin onto his fingertips. Immediately move your right hand directly to the right, bringing the coin out from beneath your left hand (fig. 21).

Move your right thumb onto the coin's edge and turn your hand over (fig. 22). Your right hand moves diagonally outward and to the right, placing the coin on the table (fig. 23). As your right hand descends your left hand also moves downward, settling into a relaxed fist on the table.

In Addition: Wait until the last possible moment to:

1) start turning your left hand palm down and your right hand palm up. They should be almost touching. 2) drop the classic palmed coin onto your fingertips. Remember, your right hand stops moving and the momentum is imparted to the coin, which flies to the left and falls onto your fingertips. 3) move your right thumb onto the coin that's resting on your fingertips. Your right hand moves to the right, drawing the coin out from beneath your left hand, then your thumb moves onto its edge.

The value of David's handling of this move will become more apparent as you read how it's used later on.

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