Retention Clip Vanish

Richard Kaufman

Many routines in this book require a vanish which takes place while your hands are in Retention Pass position. The widespread use of the move, which has appeared in both Greater Magic and Bobo's Modern Coin Magic (and is Vernon's), is due to David Roth's extensive use of it in his lectures, and his influence upon coin magic in general. To keep this book complete, here's a version of the move that I developed several years ago.

Hold a half dollar between your right thumb, on the inner side, and first and second fingers, on the outer side (fig. 1). Your third and pinky fingers are naturally curled and out of the way. I'll teach the right-hand action first, and then how to coordinate that with closing your left fingers.

Figure 2 is an audience view. Extend your second finger across the face of the coin (fig. 3). Relax your first finger a bit so that it's not pressing the coin as firmly against your thumb. When you do that start to curl your second finger. The coin will slowly tilt sideways onto your second finger (fig. 4).

Figure 2 is an audience view. Extend your second finger across the face of the coin (fig. 3). Relax your first finger a bit so that it's not pressing the coin as firmly against your thumb. When you do that start to curl your second finger. The coin will slowly tilt sideways onto your second finger (fig. 4).

Your first finger should automatically be in position so that if it presses lightly downward the coin's forward edge will be clipped between it and your second finger. Lift your thumb (fig. 5). Your palm is toward the left throughout this. If you rotate your hand to a palm-down position, slightly curling your fingers. the coin will drop to fingertip rest on your second and third fingers (the exact position is described in detail later in this section).

Add the left-hand action. Hold your left hand palm toward audience, fingers pointing downward, behind the coin displayed by your right hand (fig. 6 is an audience view). As you rapidly close your left fingers into a loose fist your right fingers perform the clipping action and move away. There's a timing knack here that gives you the retention, and it has to do with coordinating your curling left fingers with your right fingers clipping the coin. As your left fingers curl your right second finger moves across the face of the coin and pulls it back to clip position. Your right hand is already moving away when your left fingers finish curling.

The tip that Roth often gives when he teaches the Retention Pass is to wait to begin the right-hand action until the tip of your left pinky touches the back of your right fingers. That way you can be sure you're stealing the coin (it the last possible moment.

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