Edward Marlo

In Ed's words: "The method that follows is in no way offered as an improvement (over Schneider's Matrix), or for that matter is it any different in effect. The only reason for its being is that it's easy and direct, with a minimum of finger flinging and card twisting. With the routine performed in a rhythmic tempo the coins assemble so easily and quickly that even magicians may be surprised at the conclusion."

You must be working on a mat. Borrow four quarters (you can use halves if you like) and lay them out in a square, about a foot apart from each other. Your left hand holds four face-down cards in a fan (fig. 611). Your palm-up right hand takes the top card at its right long side between thumb (above) and fingers (below) (fig. 612). Your right hand turns palm down to display the card's face. Note that your fingertips are at the edge of the card (fig. 613).

You must be working on a mat. Borrow four quarters (you can use halves if you like) and lay them out in a square, about a foot apart from each other. Your left hand holds four face-down cards in a fan (fig. 611). Your palm-up right hand takes the top card at its right long side between thumb (above) and fingers (below) (fig. 612). Your right hand turns palm down to display the card's face. Note that your fingertips are at the edge of the card (fig. 613).

Turn your right hand palm up again and begin moving it toward the outer right coin. As it travels extend your second, third, and pinky fingers beneath the card (fig. 614 in which the card is transparent). Without pausing lower the card over the outerright coin, the backs of your fingers pressing downward onto it (fig. 615). While your thumb pushes lightly downward on the card to hold it in place your fingers pivot toward you, moving out from beneath the card with the coin beneath them (fig. 617 in which the fingers are transparent).

Once your fingers are completely clear of the card your right hand begins to slide inward, turning palm up as it goes (fig. 618). It moves in a straight line toward the inner right coin. Your hand stops when the coin concealed beneath your fingers is directly in front of the visible coin (fig. 619).

At the same time your left hand places the next card into your right hand, between thumb and fingers (fig. 620). Once your left hand has moved away with the two remaining cards your right hand tables the card it holds over the two coins beneath it. Note that its natural action, which is to hold the card in place with the thumb and swivel the fingers out from beneath it, is exactly the same as the steal of the first coin.

Your right hand takes one of the two cards remaining in your left hand and covers the outer-left coin, then takes the last card and covers the inner-left coin. Both of the just-covered coins should be just right of center beneath the cards (fig. 621 in which the cards are transparent). At this point, while the audience thinks there is a coin beneath each card, there are two at the inner right, and none at the outer right.

Hold your left hand over the outer-left card and your right hand over the inner-right card. Both hands snap their fingers. Your right hand immediately lifts the card beneath it by its right long side, thumb above

and fingers beneath, revealing two coins, saying "Two here " (fig. 622). Don't pause. Your right hand flips its card face up end over end (so it's still held the same way). Your left fingers press downward on the left long side of the outer-left card as your right hand slides its face-up card beneath it, trapping the coin between the cards (fig. 623). Your right hand lifts both cards and turns palm down to display the other side, saying, ". . none here" (fig. 624). (Call this the Scoop Vanish.)

Turn your right hand palm up and move it over the inner-right coins. Press lightly downward with your thumb so your fingers can slide the face-up card to the right (fig. 625). The coin between the cards will join the two beneath the face-down card. Your right hand turns the card it still holds face down, holding it by its right long side.

Your left hand snaps its fingers over the inner-left card. Repeat the Scoop Vanish as described, this time at the inner-left corner (and with both cards face down).

once the vanish has registered for a moment your left hand lifts the inner-right card revealing three coins. Your left hand immediately tosses its card, face up, to the mat's outer-left corner. Arrange the three coins at the inner right in a horizontal row (fig. 626). Bend your right hand at the wrist and cover the coins so they're left partially exposed (fig. 627). Raise your right thumb a bit and slide the lower card toward you, out from beneath the upper card (which remains partially covering the coins). Your right hand turns its card face up and tosses it onto the card already at the outer left.

Turn your right hand palm down and move your thumb onto the center of the inner long side of the card covering the three coins. Push the card forward, ostensibly to cover the coins completely, but actually to set up for the Dingle-Schneider Pickup Move, i.e., until your thumbtip hits the inner edge of the extra coin beneath the card. Raise both hands, one over each of the remaining face-down cards. Start to snap your fingers, then change your mind. Lower your right hand over the inner-right card and do the Pickup Move so that three coins are seen, the fourth coin concealed beneath the card.

Your left hand moves a coin from one end of the row forward, between the other two, to form a triangle. Replace the right-hand card, adding the fourth coin.

End by lifting the card at the outer right with your left hand, turning it face up and tossing it onto those already at the outer left. Lift the last card to reveal all four coins.

In Addition: If you don't already know it, the Dingle-Schneider Pickup Move (which was developed by both men independently) is described later on in David Arthur's SeeSaw 'Sembly.

Mario adds: "The idea of sliding a coin secretly under a hand is not new - Dr. Daley used a similar procedure in a routine published in The Phoenix. I do not recall such a maneuver being done with the hand palm up and obviously empty. The pinching of a coin secretly between two cards was used by Mike Spooner and published in an Ellison Poland book, however Spooner used the idea to secretly obtain and transport a coin during the initial layout of the coins, but not to actually vanish a coin and then secretly add a coin using a one-ahead approach."

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