Introduction To Original Monograph

Let man take time enough for the most trivial deed, though it be but paring his nails. The Clock Effect using playing cards came originated at the turn of the century. Potter's Index subsequently listed thirty-eight (38) references one of the earliest being Hercat's More Conjuring (1912). However, Fred G. Taylor's Crazy Clocks in Pallbearers Review (Volume 3 - Number 3 January 1968) was the method that piqued my interest. Taylor wrote that he based his method on an old German effect, but cited...

The Magic Clock Roy Walton

In his own words, another variation This is a variation of the clock dial effect using the presentation angle of a magical clock dial that will assist any spectators to become successful conjurors the method, as usual, is simple math, thinly disguised as a card trick. It is necessary first of all to hand spectators A and B twelve cards each, but they should not be aware of the quantity of cards they have. There are many ways to achieve this. The one I normally use is to glimpse the two face...

Mystic Twelve Recall Audley Walsh

This effect is still baffling to anyone unfamiliar with the principle upon which it is based. In the original version, Walsh used an edge-marked card as a key. However, any kind of identifying device can be used a crimp, nail-nick, pencil dot, or imperfection marking. The one you use should be based on the sophistication of your audience. The natural mark or imperfection principle to determine a key card is excellent. (See Time Must Tell in Phoenix 174 or Cy Endfield's Entertaining Card Magic -...

Stolen Hours Edward Marlo

There are so many ways to go with this approach. The underlying idea is the same as Cardician's Dream in Marlo's The Cardician. That is, the bottom card is secretly crimped. The deck should be borrowed and can be completely and thoroughly shuffled by the spectator. This is a redeeming feature. On getting back the deck, crimp the bottom card, using Marlo's Method For Crimping or any other crimp you may prefer. Then explain that the spectator is to think of any hour on the clock dial from one...

Edward Marlo

This is not a Clock Effect, but the same basic principle is applied to make it work. The effect is an interesting change-of-pace from having to read many variations on the same theme. This effect also apparently was the template for a trick called Overkill that was published in Close-up Fantasies - Book 1 (1980), pp. 73-76, and later reprinted in The Art of Astonishment - Book Two (1996), pp. 183-184. Wes Emberg and Allan Ackerman collaborated and ratcheted up the climax. The title of the trick...

Speaking Of The Clock Marvin A Johnson

Johnson, after seeing me perform several versions of the Clock Effect, made a couple of worthy additions of his own. They were published in M-U-M (December - 1970 Volume 60, Number 7). The First Variation consists of setting up the deck in a Memorized set-up such as the Ireland or Nicola Stack. Shift the bottom card to the top, moving each card in the Stack down one notch or position. Give the deck a false shuffle. Ask the spectator to think of an hour, remove the same number of...

Card Chronometry Jon Racherbaumer

Ron Wilson coined the term, paying the price, which apparently suggests the following An effect consists of structured elements combined to form a given action procedure. When you strengthen a certain element or component in this procedure, other elements or components elsewhere in the effect's structure will likely weaken. Analysts must decide where they are willing to ''pay the price and how high a price they are willing to pay. For example, sometimes a performer sacrifices an element of...

A Few Seconds On Stay Stack Jon Racherbaumer

If you are partial to using the Stay Stack, you can perform several effects while maintaining the Stay Stack. You can also fluctuate between using Si Stebbins and Stay Stack as outlined by Marlo in Hierophant 2, p. 61, Marlo On Stebbins Stay-Stack. Therefore, before commencing the Clock Effect, give the deck a couple of quick Out Faro shuffles, retaining the Stay-Stack order. Turn your back and tell the spectator to think of an hour, remove an equal number of cards from the top of the deck, and...

Technicolor Hour Jon Racherbaumer

As we know, most clock effects are dull. Their mathematical foundations are conspicuous and dilute the sense of mystery. The Taylor stunt, however, has a vouchsafing feature directness. Taking a cue from Marlo's Unexpected Prediction, the following variation makes the prediction feature an unexpected climax and eliminates the billets and repeat. No explanations are necessary and the prophetic nature of the effect is self-evident - from Mike Rogers' column (Table Time) in M-U-M. This version was...

Time For Si Stebbins Edward Marlo

Because you are now familiar with Marlo's The Predetermined Hour, you appreciate this application. Since the force-card is usually positioned thirteenth from the top, this makes the distribution found in the Si Stebbins set-up advantageous. Likewise, in the light of recent effects using the Si Stebbins stack, all conducive to creating longer routines, this application is another possibility. Method After performing some other effects such as those in Si Stebbins Sorcery and while maintaining...