Weave Corrections for Miscuts

After gaining the knack for getting the cards to weave together, the two greatest obstacles to the mastery of the faro shuffle are learning to cut the pack precisely in half, and obtaining a perfect alternation of the cards. For most students, perfecting the estimate cut may elude them long after they have achieved confidence with the flawless interlace. It is not particularly difficult to estimate the cut within a card, one way or the other; but the problem of being one card off perpetually haunts the faro shuffler.

The most common method for correcting miscuts, once they become evident in the weave, is to strip the interlaced corners apar t, replace the top half over the bottom half, make the required adjustment and weave the cards again. This process makes the faro shuffle—already an inherently studied procedure—all the more labored; and the possibility of having the shuffle perceived as an uncalculated activity becomes hopeless.

In the 1950s Mr. Elmsley contrived simple and unobtrusive procedures for correcting a miscut, when a perfect in- or out-weave is required. The first four adjustments apply to a pack with an even number of cards. Since a fifty-two card pack is the standard, this is assumed in the following descriptions.

Out-weave Correction—ioiuer portion contains twenty-five cards, upper portion contains twenty-seven: You have cut one card too deep. The situation should become obvious to you the instant you align the ends of the packets for the weave. Seeing that the upper portion is too large, perform a straddle-weave, with just the bottom card of the upper portion woven below the bottom card of the lower portion.

Consequently, two cards from the upper portion will lie above the top card of the lower portion (Figure 209). Push or spring the cards flush, concluding the shuffle. Immediately perform a brief overhand shuffle that consists of "milking" off the top and bottom cards together and throwing the balance of the pack beneath the pair. The cards are now ordered just as they would have been had the cut been accurate and an out-weave made. A rule easily remembered is that, with this adjustment and the next, the milked pair of cards always goes to the end of the deck where the two unwoven cards lay after the weave.

Out-weave Correction—louier portion contains twenty-seven cardst upper portion contains twenty-five: You have cut one card shallow. Seeing that the upper portion is too small, perform a straddle-weave, with two cards from the lower portion going below the bottom card of the upper portion. One card from the lower portion will then lie above the top card of the upper portion (Figure 210). Push or spring the cards flush, then perform an overhand shuffle that consists of milking off the top and bottom cards and throwing the balance of the pack onto the pair. The cards are now arranged exactly as if a perfect out-weave had been made.

This will probably seem a bit complicated atfirst. Mr. Elmsley has conceived of a simple way of thinking about these procedures that aids in remembering them. He imagines that each half of the deck has its own "center of gravity". When executing an out-weave, the center of gravity for the lower packet must always lie below the center of gravity for the upper packet. This holds hue with both miscuts just described. If the lower portion is a card short, it is straddle-woven into the upper portion with its center of gravity lower; that is, two cards from the upper portion lie above it. But if the lower portion is greater by one card, the upper portion is straddle-woven into it, again with the center of gravity of the lower portion resting below that of the upper portion; that is, two cards from the lower portion rest below the upper portion.

In-weave Correction—lower portion contains twenty-five cards, upper portion contains twenty-seven: You have cut one

card too deep. Straddle-weave the lower portion into the upper, so that two cards from the upper portion lie below the bottom card of the lower portion, and one card from the upper portion lies above the top card of the lower portion (Figure 211). Square the interlaced packets into each other, then run one card from the bottom of the deck to the top. A reverse double undercut also can be used to transfer this card. The arrangement of the deck is now identical to that created by a perfect in-weave,

In-weave Correction—lower portion contains twenty-seven cards, upper portion contains twenty-Jive: You have cut one card shallow. Straddle-weave the upper portion into the lower, placing one card from the lower portion below the bottom card of the upper portion, and two cards from the lower portion above the top card of the upper portion (Figure 212). Square the cards together and run the top card to the bottom; or transfer it there with a double undercut. Using Mr, Elmsley's concept of center of gravity, remembering these two corrections can also be simplified. When making an in-weave, the center of gravity of the lower packet must lie above that of the upper packet. Thus, if the lower portion is short one card, it is straddle-woven into the upper portion with one card from the upper portion going above It, and two going below; and if the lower portion is one card greater, the upper portion is straddle-woven into it, placing two cards from the lower portion above the upper portion.

It also should be noted that, if the purpose of the weave is simply to bring together cards that originally rest twenty-six apart in the deck, unless the cards of interest he at the top or bottom of the

rection—lower portion contains twenty-eight cards, upper portion contains twenty-Jive:

You have cut one card shallow. Straddle-weave the upper portion into the lower, placing two cards from the lower portion under the upper portion, and two cards above it

(Figure 214). Square the packets, milk off the top card with the bottom card, and throw the balance of the deck onto this pair.

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