Magnetic Colors

The spectator gives the deck a riffle shuffle. Although the shuffle appears to be completely random, the spectator finds on dealing off pairs of cards that every pair contains exactly one red and one black card Method This routine was independently devised by Gene Fin-nell, Norman Gilbreath and others. Preparation consists of arranging the deck so that the colors alternate red-black-red-black from top to bottom. Cut the deck at about the midpoint. The only stipulation is that there is a red...

Aces For Experts

The production of the four aces is one of the most impressive feats you can perform with a deck of cards. The catch is that if you use a borrowed deck, with no time to set the cards, there is generally a great deal of technical skill called for if you want to produce the aces in a magical manner. The following routine was devised by the author as a streamlined ace production requiring no skill. Taking a borrowed, shuffled deck, the magician holds the cards face up so that only he can see the...

Faceup Poker

This chapter closes with a poker bet that is little known outside a small circle. The details of this ingenious bet have surfaced in various publications, but this is believed to be the first complete description of all angles on the proposition. The game assumes that the players have a knowledge of the way poker hands are ordered. From highest to lowest, the hands arc rated as follows The game is this. The deck is shuffled and spread lace up on the table. You are going to play two rounds. In...

Hypnodeck

In this routine the spectator can think of any card in the deck. The magician never knows the name of the card, yet he places the deck behind his back and instantly produces the thought-of card. The routine was devised by Howard Adams. This is one of the few tricks in this book that require a full-deck setup, but the effect is worth the effort. After the pack has been made up, it can be reserved for use just on those occasions when you want to present this routine. Arrange the deck as follows...

The Great Phone Mystery

The spectator is given the deck behind his back. He removes the top card, turns it over and inserts it anywhere in the deck. Then he removes the bottom card, turns it over and inserts it anywhere in the pack. Spreading the pack face down on the table, he finds the first reversed card and the card that is face to face with it. Then he finds the other reversed card and removes the card that is face to face with it. There are now two random cards on the table. The spectator goes to the phone,...

Riffleshuffle Setups

Riffle-shuffle setups represent one of the newest areas to emerge in card magic. In tricks of this nature the spectator is allowed to shuffle the deck. Although it would seem that the deck is in random order after the shuffle, in feet the magician can control the distribution of cards in the entire deck. It is this surprising feet which leads to strong card tricks using shuffle setups. Except where noted, the material in this chapter is from my own files. The chapter begins with simple ideas...

The Prediction Deck

The magician opens an envelope and takes out a deck of cards, explaining that the deck was mailed to him by an Oriental. In the deck, he says, is a prediction, fortunately written in English. It involves an event that has not yet taken place. The pack is placed face down on the table. The spectator is invited to lift off less than half the deck. He can take one card or 25. The choice is entirely his and he is encouraged to try and second-guess the prophet by taking fewer or more cards than...

Esp Math

The spectator shuffles two packets of cards together. Then he deals off the top three cards and hands them to the magician behind his back. If the packet contains at least two cards of the same suit, the magician reveals the matching suit. Then, with the packet still behind his tack, he finds at least one of the matching-suit cards. The process is repeated until there are no cards left. Each time the magician correctly reveals the matching suit and then goes on to find one card of that suit,...

Incorporated Color Control

The magician removes two cards from the deck, jots down a prediction on each, and then inserts the cards back into the pack. The pack is handed to a spectator for a riffle shuffle. After he shuffles the cards, the spectator is told to deal pairs of cards face up off the top. Matching red pairs go into one heap, matching blacks into a separate heap, and red-black or non-match-ing pairs go into a third heap. When he comes to the pair containing one of the prediction cards, the spectator reads it...

Past And Future

The most impressive and memorable tricks are those that involve the spectator in a personal way. In this routine you predict the future by correctly foretelling which card a spectator is going to pick. Then you disclose the past by telling the spectator his date of birth. The trick is impromptu. It uses no gimmicks or confederates. Method The basic idea is a routine of Verne Schoneck's. Use any borrowed deck and a paper bag. Take the deck and a pencil. Explain that you are going to write a...

Posinegative Cards

This is one of the strongest tricks that can be done with a riffle-shuffle setup. The basic effect was developed by several magicians. This handling was suggested by J. W. Sarles. A spectator is asked to remove a deck of cards from its case, cut the pack a few times, and then give the deck a riffle shuffle. He then deals the deck into two heaps, one face up, one face down. He deals a card at a time off the top, dealing from left to right through the entire deck. The spectator picks up the...

Blind Choice

This brilliant trick, invented by Roy Walton, is .one in which both the spectator and the performer successfully guess the colors of the cards. The routine has not previously appeared in print. Stack the deck so the colors alternate red-black-red-black from top to bottom. Hand the pack to a spectator and have him cut the deck and complete the cut a few times. He then cuts off about half the deck and riffle shuffles the two halves together. Spread the pack out face up to show how well mixed the...

Any Hand Called

In the T, Nelson Downs poker deal, the magician dealt any number of hands and always came up with the winning hand. Here Michael Zens varies the plot by having the spectator name any kind of hand (royal flush, four of a kind, etc.). The magician deals the cards, turns up the dealer's hand, and it is the very hand named by the spectator. This is an impressive demonstration of skill at the card table. By means of ingenious thinking, complicated setups are done away with. The Zens stack is V...

Moving Parts

The effect briefly is that four cards are torn in half and mixed, yet the halves of each card correctly and instantly find their mating halves. Preparation is simple. Tear or cut a slit in the AA, A2, and 4k 3, tearing from one side across to the center as shown in Figure 32. Slide the cards together as shown in Figure 33 so that the A 2 and A3 slide into the slit in the A A. Another view is shown in Figure 34. Square up the packet, turn it end for end and hold it in the left hand, then place...

Koudini Card

A rubber band is then placed widthwise around the pack. Another rubber band is placed lengthwise around the pack. The chosen card is still in the deck and the deck is sealed on all sides by the rubber bands. Nevertheless, when the deck is covered with a handkerchief, the chosen card instantly comes free of the doubly banded deck. Method Before proceeding, secretly mark the back of the too card of the deck. This card will act as a key card. Spread the pack and have any card chosen. Ask the...

Ritual Of The Kings

Sometimes a simple but offbeat trick will be remembered long after more complex mysteries are forgotten. This is a strange effect, in which the spectator himself locates any card he himself names. Since there is a bit of ritual involved, the trick gains in dramatic effects if performed late at night in a dimly lit room. To prepare, have 20 indifferent cards on top of the deck, then the four jacks, then the four kings, then the four queens and finally the balance of the deck. Hand the spectator...

The Calculator Card Trick

The trick is immediately repeated and the calculator is once again correct. Method The only preparation is to note and remember the top card of the deck. In the above example this card is a seven-spot. Have the spectator cut off a packet of cards onto your palm. Then turn up the top card of packet B. Whatever its value, mentally add this to the card you memorized. In our example the top card of B is an eight, so you would silently add eight and seven, getting 15. Say to the spectator, Suppose I...

The Omega

Properly presented, this wager will establish your reputation as master of betting games. It begins as a simple game. When the spectator begins to get suspicious about the procedure you immediately tighten the conditions. When he gets more suspicious you tighten the conditions farther. Should he still be suspicious (especially in view of your unbroken winning streak) you make it impossible for cheating to occur, yet you still win. The game is simple and the cards are handled by the spectator...

Twentiethcentury Telepathy

This is the original telephone trick, devised by John N. Hilliard and published in 1905. With attention to dramatic presentation, it is still one of the best demonstrations of telephone telepathy. The details of performance are important. Hilliard urged that the trick be done as an experiment in long-distance telepathy rather than as a card ttick. The following description is taken from his original article. Have someone go into the next room. Explain that this person will be a committee of...

Invisible Con

In this trick you require one visible spectator and one invisible spectator. A prediction is written and placed aside. You have a card noted by the throw of a die. The die then locates the chosen card, and for a kicker it locates a card that the invisible spectator would have chosen had he been present. Before beginning the trick, note the top card of the deck. Say it is the A A. This small bit of preparation is done secretly. To perform the trick, remark that you wanted to include a friend of...

Jumpback

This final routine introduces a paradox to the format of the traditional two-deck trick. If you perform a two-deck trick on some occasion, and on a later occasion are asked to repeat the trick, this is a good routine to do because it seems as if you are doing a standard two-deck trick right up to the last second. Then things take a strange turn. It is the author's solution to a challenging problem. A spectator choose a card from a red-backed deck and signs his name on the face of the card. Say...

Monte Miracle

Three-Card Monte is a fair-seeming game that requires sleight-of-hand ability and a quick tongue to demonstrate successfully, but there is a version that uses a puzzling optical illusion to bring about the basic effect. As in the classic trick, you use two black cards and a red ace. The spectator is asked to guess the whereabouts of the ace. Although the ace is prominently placed, the spectator fails to find it. Use the two black deuces and the V A. Place the ace between the deuces, but at...

Oil And Water

The trick in which reds and blacks magically separate was noted as a card problem by the great nineteenth-century conjuror J. N. Hofeinser. A small-packet version was described by Walter Gibson in a magic magazine called The Jinx. Since its publication it has become a magic classic. The effect is that four reds and four blacks are mixed together. Then they instantly separate. The simplest handling is described here. Have four blacks in one pile and four reds in the other. Hold them as shown in...

Crazy Clocks

Novel effects are always remembered by the audience. Fred Taylor here describes an offbeat trick that originally appeared in a European magazine. The magician writes a prediction, folds it and places it under the spectator's watchband for safekeeping. The spectator is asked to think of any full hour from one to 12. When he has an hour in mind, 12 cards are dealt off the pack face up and arranged in the form of a clock dial as shown in Figure 7. The spectator is asked to remember the card that...

Speak Of The Devil

After signing a pact with the Devil, the unwary victim is frequently offered a chance to double his money. The bet is simple. The Devil removes the 13 spades from the deck. He picks one of these cards for himself. A simple process of elimination is used to discard all of the remaining cards except one. If this card is higher than the Devil's card, the victim wins. Otherwise he loses. The ace is low the king is high. Obviously, if I picked the king, the Devil says, You couldn't pick a card that...

The Linking Cards

In Amusements in Mathematics Dover 20473-1) H. E. Dudeney describes The Cardboard Chain, a puzzle in which each cardboard link is solid. In some older books the piece of cardboard is a playing card. The following is the author's version, in which two playing cards magically link together. The cards are solid and there are no gimmicks. As seen by the audience, you tear the center from each of two cards, Figure 41. The cards are then opened out, as in Figure 42, and placed under a handkerchief....

Hex Squared

Shortly after its appearance in print, this routine was featured in a television show devoted to mental magic and was reprinted in a nationally distributed news weekly. To describe the effect is also to describe the method so we shall proceed immediately into the details. Arrange 16 cards in the color sequence indicated in Figure 59. The actual values and suits are of no consequence so long as the colors agree with the layout. Assuming the deck is red-backed, the card shown in the third column...

The Stapled Card

After you become acquainted with different force techniques, you can choose a method that is exactly appropriate to the trick you want to perform. One example will be given here, an application of the X-Force described in the opening pages of this chapter. Although the method is simple, the effect is spectacular. As seen by the audience, the spectator chooses a card and signs the fact. The card is returned to the deck. Then two jokers are shown. They are stapled together and placed on the...

Ace Triumph

Some of the strongest card tricks substitute clever handling for sleight of hand. Once the handling is learned well enough for it to be performed without hesitation, the magic just seems to happen. In this routine fece-up cards are mixed with face-down cards. The magician snaps his fingers and all the cards turn face down. The kicker is that four of the cards remain face up, but they are the four aces Method Beforehand secretly reverse the four aces on the bottom of the deck. Thus the deck will...

Mental Rescue

This splendid mental effect was originated by L. Vosburgh Lyons. Two spectators are seated opposite each other at a table. Each takes five cards from the deck. Each person shuffles his cards, chooses one, and places it in the other person's packet. The packets are each shuffled again by the spectators. Picking up a packet, the magician concentrates for a moment, then removes one card. Picking up the other packet, the magician again concentrates and then removes a card. It turns out that these...

The Jaks Twodeck Trick

This trick by Stanley Jaks is a classic of contemporary card magic. The routine will be described as Jaks originally presented it, with a third deck used to obtain an additional effect, but you will see that even without the third deck the routine is exceptional. The performer gives two decks of cards to two spectators. One deck has red backs and the other has blue backs. While these decks are being removed from their cases and shuffled by the spectators, the magician gives a third deck to...

Calling Ms Wizard

In this version of the telephone trick the medium's name and phone number are known from the start, yet she is able to name any thought-of card. The idea is this. Have someone name any card. You then go to the phone and dial the medium's number. When she picks up the phone she begins counting from one to 13. When she calls out the value of the named card, you say, Hello If for example she called out, One, two, three, four and you said, Hello she would know that the value of the thought -of card...

Topological Card Tricks

The tricks in this chapter use cards that are torn or folded. This may seem a slender premise on which to base a chapter, but topological card tricks represent an offbeat approach that generates surprising and different card effects. Most topological card tricks requite gimmicks or manipulation that lie outside the scope of this book. The tricks in this brief chapter have been chosen because they are easy to perform and provide something of the flavor of this unique area of card magic.

To Lie Or Teix The Truth

Jack Avis devised an excellent trick which will quickly establish your reputation as a card expert. The plot, originally suggested by Martin Gardner, is one where the spectator is asked a series of questions about a chosen card and is encouraged to lie or tell the truth in answer co the questions. The deck has been programmed like a lie detector. It provides the correct answers to his questions, and then it goes on to produce the chosen card It is only necessary that you secretly note the...

Color Prophecy

In this puzzling effect, devised by Gene Finnell, the spectator shuffles the pack and deals it into two heaps. He takes either heap and gives the other to the performer. The performer runs through his cards and openly turns several of them face up. Then he places the heap on the table. The performer explains that he has made an odd sort of prediction with his cards. He and the spectator will deal cards simultaneously from the tops of the heaps. If the performer deals a face-down card, it will...