The Tabled Palm

One Hand Table Palm Tabled RifflePalm Flat Palm Steal Angle Palm Steal Adjustment Misdirection Table Riffle Angle Palm Longtidunal Angle Palm Ribbon Spread Palm Traveling Double Ten and Ten Tabled Stop Effect Out of Your Hands As A Control Card To Top Sell Or Delusion Face Up Elimination Rise-Rise-Rise First and Second Method Angle Palm Transfer Tip Up Angle Palm Full Buckle Palm Center Block Palm Direct Rear Palm Direct Full Palm The Card Transfer The Lost Card

This chapter deals primarily with the type of palming that is done while the pack is on the table in one way or another. It may be that the cards are shuffled on the table, spread on the table or merely resting in a squared up position.

It may be that the card cheat will again claim priority to this idea of palming cards while the pack is resting on the table but the first record of any such palm is to be found in Eddie Joseph's Greater Card Tricks. It is this source which first started us on the road of devising other methods; however, our first method was in some respects similar to the original Joseph method except for a change in technique. It is described under One Hand Table Palm and the student is free to compare the two techniques if he so desires.

Our second method followed the Action Theory as applied to the Tabled Palm and this thinKing will be evident in the Table Riffle Palm as well as its flexibility in cases where it is required to palm a definite number of cards in either the left or right hand.

The latest form of Table Palm will be found in such as the Angle Palm which was innocently inspired while looking at Figure 15 of Chapter One of this volume, Miracle Changes and musing that with the picture by itself you couldn't tell whether a card was being replaced or palmed off. This started not only a train of thought but experimentation which not only proved successful but resulted in effects such as Rise-Rise-Rise and Out of Your Hands, a problem originally posed in Trick Talk, the house organ of the Ireland Magic Co. and here explained in detail with its variants. The remainder of the chapter deals with additional palms which, while not of the tabled variety will be found most effective when used for the purpose intended.

The last item in the book, The Card Transfer, we found hard to classify strictly as a Table Palm because it is so much more than just another method of stealing a card as the cardician will discover on reading and trying the move and its various applications.

Having thus whetted your appetite, we invite you to read and study this chapter on The Tabled Palm.

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